Book fair, Travel Grants, & more!

As always, you can also see what’s coming up through the Educational Opportunities Calendar. Keep reading for details about all the great webinars, grants, scholarships and more opportunities below!

Book Fair:

The annual Book Paper Scissors Artists’ Book Fair, sponsored by the Art Department and Philadelphia Center for the Book, is being held in the Lobby of Parkway Central Library this Saturday, December 8th from 10-4. More than 20 artists will be showing and selling their work. This festive event features prints, artists’ books, handmade paper, zines, origami, blank books, paper sculpture, and jewelry, made by local artists. If it’s paper-based art, it’s here. Come and buy, or just be inspired! You will find hundreds of affordable and interesting gifts for everyone on your list by artists working in different disciplines at all price levels. This is a great opportunity to view and even handle unique works of art, to shop locally, and to purchase items crafted by hand.

There will also be 2 free workshops, taught by graduate students from the Book Arts/Printmaking program at the University of the Arts:

A Tale of Two Pamphlets with Erin Paulson

11 am-12 pm FREE Room 108

The pamphlet is a simple and elegant book structure that lends itself to many purposes, from zines to a special hand-written letter. In this workshop we will learn both the three-hole and the five-hole stitch, and you will walk away with two completed books!

For teens and adults.

Thaumatropes: Victorian era toys for kids

with J. Pascoe and Erin Malkowski

2 pm-3 pm FREE Room 108

This workshop will explore the amazing versatility of thaumatropes — a children’s toy popular in the Victorian era that is now seen as a precursor to modern animation. Children will learn about and experiment with the thaumatrope as a vehicle to understanding basic animation, eye-hand coordination, and creativity!

For kids of all ages.

The Lewis Walpole Library Fellowships & Travel Grants:

The Lewis Walpole Library, a department of Yale University Library, invites applications to its 2013–2014 fellowship program. Located in Farmington, Connecticut, the Library offers short-term residential fellowships and travel grants to support research in the Library’s rich collections of eighteenth-century—mainly British—materials, including important holdings of prints, drawings, manuscripts, rare books, and paintings, as well as a growing collection of sources for the study of New England Native Americans. Scholars pursuing postdoctoral or equivalent advanced research, as well as doctoral candidates at work on a dissertation, are encouraged to apply.

Recipients are expected to be in residence at the Library, to be free of other significant professional obligations during their stay, and to focus their research on the Lewis Walpole Library’s collections. Fellows also have access to additional resources at Yale, including those in the Sterling Memorial Library, the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, and the Yale Center for British Art. Residential fellowships, usually for one month, include the cost of travel to and from Farmington, accommodation in an eighteenth-century house on the Library’s campus, and a $2,100 living allowance stipend. Travel grants typically cover transportation costs for research trips of shorter duration and include on-site accommodation.

To apply for a fellowship or travel grant, candidates should send a curriculum vitae, including educational background, professional experience and publications, and a brief outline of the research proposal (not to exceed three pages) to:

Margaret K. Powell

W.S. Lewis Librarian and Executive Director

The Lewis Walpole Library

PO Box 1408

Farmington, CT 06034 USA

fax: 860-677-6369

e-mail: margaret.powell@yale.edu .

Two confidential letters of recommendation are also required by the application deadline. Letters should specifically address the merits of the candidate’s project and application. General letters of recommen­dation or dossier letters are not appropriate.

The application deadline is January 18, 2013.

Awards will be announced in March.

Additional information: http://www.library.yale.edu/walpole

Call for poster session proposals for ALA Annual Conference (Chicago 2013):

Share your best ideas and work with the national library community by presenting a poster session at the 2013 ALA Annual Conference in Chicago!

Start your application process now at http://ala13.ala.org/how-to-submit-a-poster-session. Note that the submission process has changed. You must create a username and password for the site before you submit your application, you must choose to submit a poster session proposal after you log-in, and you will receive a confirmation e-mail after you have completed your submission.

The deadline for submission of 2013 ALA Annual Conference poster session proposals is January 18.

The poster session committee encourages submissions from all types of libraries and on any topic relevant to librarianship. Submissions may include a description of an innovative library program; an analysis of a solution to a problem; a report of a research study; or any other presentation that would benefit the larger library community.

Poster session participants place materials such as pictures, data, graphs, diagrams and narrative text on boards that are usually 4 x 8 feet. During their assigned 11Ž2 hour time periods, participants informally discuss their presentations with conference attendees. Titles/abstracts from previous years, and pictures of sample posters, are available at the old poster session website: http://www.lib.jmu.edu/org/ala (note that this site is only serving as an archive for previous Annual Conference poster sessions – for information on this year’s posters, go to: http://ala13.ala.org/poster-sessions).

The deadline for submitting an application is January 18, 2013. Applicants will be notified in March, prior to the early bird registration deadline, whether their submission has been accepted for presentation at the conference. The 2013 ALA Annual Poster Sessions will be held June 29 and 30, 2013 (the Saturday and Sunday of the conference), at the McCormick Place convention center in Chicago.

Questions about poster session presentations and submissions may be directed to:

Luke Vilelle, chair of the ALA poster session committee, lvilelle@hollins.edu

Or

Candace Benefiel, chair of the ALA poster session review panel, cbenefie@lib-gw.tamu.edu

Internship opportunity:

The Frick Art Reference Library is seeking candidates for its summer 2013 internships. Openings are available in the following departments:

* Administrative Department

* Book Department

* Center for the History of Collecting

* Conservation Department

* Photoarchive Department

* Public Services Department

For more information about these and other internships at The Frick Collection, seehttp://www.frick.org/careers/internships.

Free talk:

The Columbia University Libraries invite you to attend “The Ethics of Visualization.”

This event is free and open to the public. Registration is not required.

TOPIC: The Ethics of Visualization

SPEAKER: Chris Alen Sula, Assistant Professor, Pratt Institute, School of Information & Library Science

WHEN: Wednesday, December 12, 2013

Noon – 1:30 PM

WHERE: 203 Butler Library

SPONSORS: Columbia Libraries Digital Program Division and the Digital Humanities Center

Visualization and infographics are widely discussed today, both inside of the academy and in the public at large. Academic departments as diverse as digital arts and humanities, cognitive science, and molecular chemistry have taken up the topic, and journalists like Geoff McGhee even claim that our future is one “in which data becomes a medium.” But despite its popularity and potential impact, “infovis” has rarely been considered in an ethical light. While there has been recent development on the philosophy of information, there is still little corresponding to an applied ethics of visualization and even less guidance available for information professionals. This talk examines the groundwork of infovis ethics and considers several ways in which visualization could give rise to obligations to/for certain groups. The conclusion will situate infovis within a techno-historical context, which raises broader issues of access, representation, and power with respect to visualization.

Webinar:

CORE Reference Fundamentals

An Infopeople online course, December 4, 2012 – Monday, January 21, 2013

Are you stepping into the role of providing reference assistance for the first time in your library career? Is it time to brush up on your basic skills because you are returning to work in a capacity that includes reference work with library users? In this 6-week course instructor Francisca Goldsmith will help you:

Learn and practice an effective reference interview.

Explore a wide variety of print and web-based tools.

Discover ways to assist diverse groups of users

Learn to think like an indexer and apply that perspective to your information hunting in response to reference questions.

For a complete course description and to register go to http://infopeople.org/training/core-reference-fundamentals-0

NOTE: This course is approved as covering the Reference and Information Services competencies for the LSSC program.

Gini Ambrosino, Infopeople Project Assistant

705 E. Bidwell, Suite 2 – 312

Folsom, CA 95630

(916) 690-6595

assist@infopeople.org

http://infopeople.org/

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