What I’ve learned since I graduated.

As of this writing, it’s been just about six months since my degree was awarded. I handed in my last coursework at the end of August 2014, and did some nail-biting while my thesis was graded. But I didn’t actually see my physical degree, framed and signed and in all its majesty, until last week, when I went home for Easter! It was surprisingly affecting — I didn’t think seeing my name all gussied up like that was going to be such a gut-punch of emotion, but I am really proud of that big piece of paper.

Between seeing that and reading this, I thought I’d try my hand at articulating a bit of perspective. It’s hard for me to write a “what I’ve learned” article without hedging my bets a bit — there are things I’ve started to dig into deeper, but I wouldn’t say I’m an expert or that my knowledge has yet paid off in practical terms. I started a full-time job as a corporate archivist the week after handing in my thesis, so a lot of what I can recommend isn’t directly applicable to arts librarianship or even the majority of MLIS/MISt graduates who might be reading this. But, I’m going to tell you what I do anyways, and it starts with how I …

1. Criticize myself. 

There is no time for a break, no time to kick back and separate yourself from the field once you hand in your last assignments. Chances are you’ve got a job offer lined up, unfinished research projects, a handful of applications to send out, a move, some volunteer commitments or conferences, or some other thing that should be occupying your time.

But you should prioritize a few hours (ideally with wine) to assess your situation, yourself, and your goals: what gaps are left in your education that will stand between you and your dream jobs? What experience do you lack based on the job postings you’re seeing? What’s the most likely progression going to be for you, from entry-level onwards? How can you prepare for each of those steps?

One of the best little tricks is to go back and read the term papers and assignment you handed in in your first semester. Does it make you cringe now to see how naive you were? Alternatively, aren’t you impressed with how far you’ve come in such a short time?

I never would’ve guessed I’d end up in corporate, but here we are, and I’m trying to look critically at which of the soft skills I’m picking up here (project management, training, research and policy-writing, etc.) are transferable and provable, and which ones I still need to acquire, so that I can start out at higher than entry-level when I get back into art and media work. But I have to acknowledge that some of my discipline-specific skills are getting rusty, so I …

2. Keep abreast.

Are you happy with all the listservs and newsfeeds you belong to? Could you stand to add more, or lose a few of the less-relevant options?

Personally, my feed for information on the profession comes from a couple of Canadian archiving lists, ARLIS, AMIA, SHARP, MCN, and the ALCTS eForum I mentioned previously. I’ve pared down a bit, and there are a few lists I’d like to be on for which I can’t afford a membership.

AMIA, for example, is a fantastic way just to keep in mind all the weird format issues and preservation challenges that multimedia workers face every day — there are always emails about finding a specific fitting for a rare tape player, or how best to clean a certain type of film with flourescent dye on it. If you’re bad at mechanical terminology, I guarantee you’ll pick it up quickly.

I use the Art News mailing that comes via CARLIS-L to remind me to check websites like Artforum and Canadian Art. Otherwise I tend to forget.

I don’t read any librarianship-specific websites regularly (other than job boards, for ArLiSNAP), but because of Twitter I’m constantly seeing blog posts from people like Barbara Fister on Inside Higher Ed, updates to journals, etc. If you want art-specific Twitter accounts to follow, check out the institutions and individuals that the ArLiSNAP account follows. (I follow a more eclectic collection, but hey, here are a couple suggestions.)

I can’t afford individual journal subscriptions, and I don’t have institutional access to that stuff, but I do read up on accessible (OA, PD) things when they go by in my feed. I only splurge on one physical publication, and that’s Cabinet Magazine, which doesn’t keep me up-to-date so much as inspire me regularly on all fronts.

On WordPress I follow things like Archives Gig, SNAP RT, most of the ARLIS SIGs’ and Sections’ blogs, and a few oddballs like Artist-Driven Archives and Failure in the Archives. I’m sure someone will tell me that I should consolidate or aggregate a bit better, but, nah.

CFPs

I’ve also got a special label in Gmail just for Calls For Proposals from the various listservs: I’m not going to apply for many this year, and most of them aren’t applicable to what I do, but I like being able to see what kinds of research and projects are being asked for, when the various deadlines come up, and which journals and conferences I might just want to consume without contributing to. But, occasionally, I do apply for stuff, because it’s always important to …

3. Hustle.

On top of the full-time job, I’ve got a few guest posts and articles queued up for publishing, two regular volunteer commitments (ArLiSNAP, and a journal I help copyedit) and some irregular ones (peer-reviewing for two journals), an ongoing data-mining project with a non-profit here in Toronto (no funding, just fun!), writing for ArLiSNAP and my own blog, and maintaining a Twitter presence of questionable quality.

I’ve done two conferences so far this year, and have two more to come (both speaking engagements, one of which is reporting on a yearly survey I run using Google Forms). This weekend I decided to start a project to improve listings of library and archives associations in Canada (probably with the goal of making Wikipedia pages for each). I have at least four copyright-related tumblrs I’d like to start. Now that I’m thinking of it, I volunteered to copyedit a new book by CARLIS, which I should be hearing about any day now ….

I think of all this as essential to keeping myself engaged with the fields I want to be in. As opposed to grad school, where my time was occupied in shallow exploration of a lot of subjects of varying interest to me, now I get to dig deep into the things I’m passionate about, and construct a broader career arc that includes artists’ practices and intents, copyrights and moral rights for creators, the history of print, preservation and access of both art and art-related documentation, and new techniques for analyzing art. Without calling it “personal branding,” I will say it was a lot easier to define some long-term research goals once I distanced myself from the generalist approach of my classes. Which leads me to …

4. Forget about everything I did in school.

No offense to my alma mater, but I didn’t leave school with a huge network of trusted peers and great professors (or respect for government funding for higher-ed, or ALA accreditation, or …). There was little critical education in the classes I took, which is understandable given the breadth of what has to be taught, but it meant I didn’t find people who thought and argued like I do. Being thrown into a room with people doesn’t guarantee you’ll find things to talk about — and the #1 thing I’ve learned since graduating is that there is a huge variance of why people got into this profession, and what it is they want to accomplish within it.

I moved away from Montreal when graduation was in sight, so I may have shot myself in the foot a little there (also I’m not on Facebook and am only a recent convert to Twitter), but I’ve managed to network so much better back in Toronto, without many ties to the people I spent a year and a half interacting with. A lot of it is online, through associations and listservs and volunteer work with eventual face-to-face meetings at conferences — and a lot of it is engaging people on social media once I’ve come to know and respect their work.

I think the best part of my MLIS was the four jobs I did during that time — one RA position, one job in the library, one internship for a design company, one summer contract with a non-profit — because it gave me at least some experience in a diversity of settings. While I am invested in the academic use of the degree, I wasn’t going to get a job without being able to articulate some proven skills and accomplishments. So, yeah, I recycled some term papers as applications for student awards, sure, but I don’t think my classwork and student chapter attendance are worth much now — and I’m sure they’re not all you have to offer the world, either. Which is why it’s good to ….

5. Stay smart about career moves.

I’ve taken to reading Get Bullish for career inspiration and advice; you might enjoy one or more of the following, if these questions are on your mind:

http://www.getbullish.com/2012/10/bullish-how-to-compete-when-youre-young-and-inexperienced/
http://www.getbullish.com/2015/04/bullish-qa-how-to-effectively-share-examples-of-your-work/
https://www.themuse.com/advice/no-really-these-are-the-best-conference-networking-tips-weve-ever-heard
http://www.getbullish.com/2012/03/bullish-the-nerdy-reflective-persons-guide-to-networking/
http://www.getbullish.com/2015/03/bullish-qa-how-do-you-get-motivated-for-a-huge-unimaginable-life-change-like-graduation/
http://www.getbullish.com/2012/06/bullish-three-tips-for-pitching-your-dream-gig-and-why-you-need-to-pitch/

I am also a fan of the Billfold, not just for the voyeurism involved in their “how other people do money” column, but for some of these:
http://thebillfold.com/2013/05/how-to-make-a-linkedin-profile-that-will-actually-help-you-get-a-job/
http://thebillfold.com/2013/02/meet-people-get-a-job-even-if-youre-an-introvert/
http://thebillfold.com/2012/05/reader-mail-how-much-should-i-be-earning-after-graduation/

 

… I think that’s it. Other than “Don’t be ashamed of using a lot of spreadsheets to get things done.”


Listservs to follow: ALCTS eForum on internships

If you’re sitting at home and missing ARLIS’s annual conference right now, you might want to subscribe to this instead:

The ALCTS eForum has occasionally two-day intensive conversation on a particular topic. Yesterday was day one of interning — how to get the most out of it as a grad student / new professional, and how to offer good ones if you’re at an institution. Non-members can sign up, and you can access the archives if you just want to read without contributing here.

Good afternoon,

We are pleased to announce next week’s e-Forum entitled “Interning: A
Supervisor’s and Student’s Perspectives,” which is scheduled to start on
March 19, 2015.

Are you currently completing an internship or have any advice for those in
one? March’s e-Forum will focus on the sharing experiences and discussing
“what makes a great internship.” Topics will include: what are great
questions to ask a supervisor, how to choose the right location, how this
impacts your future career or how it helps with your current job, and so much
more. We look forward to a stimulating, valuable conversation about
internships and how they work for institutions, schools, and students.

Hosts

Professor Mary Wilkins Jordan has a BA and a BS from Quincy University, a JD
from Case Western Reserve University, an MLS from University of Wisconsin –
Milwaukee, and a doctorate from University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill.
Prior to entering academia, Jordan worked in public libraries as a director
and administrator. Her research and consulting work now focuses on ways to
help libraries to function better and to serve their communities more
effectively. At the School of Library and Information Science at Simmons
College, she teaches Management and Evaluation classes, as well as Public
Libraries, Reference, and Internship, all with a focus on helping students
acquire the skills they need to be successful in their professional careers.
Prof Jordan can be reached by e-mail at mary.wilkinsjordan@simmons.edu. Her
mailing address is Mary Wilkins Jordan, Simmons College SLIS, 300 The Fenway,
Boston, MA 02115.

Kristen Gallant is currently a graduate student in her last semester of the
LIS program at the University of Missouri-Columbia. She has a B.A. and M.A.
in Art History, with a focus in Medieval and Renaissance art. Her academic
interests are in digital libraries, art libraries, special collections,
collection development, and metadata. Her current practicum project is based
on the Foliophile publication, Pages from the Past. The project is a
collaborative effort between the Digital Services and Special Collections
departments at the University of Missouri-Columbia that involves collection
development, digitization, research, metadata creation, and web publication
of individual leaves. After graduation, Kristen hopes to find employment as a
librarian of an art department or in a digital library.

The ALCTS e-Forum discussion takes place using email, and you can expect to
see a number of emails on this topic during the two-day duration.  When the
moderators kick off discussion, you will receive an email message.  To
participate, you simply send messages to alcts-eforum@lists.ala.org or
respond to an email sent to you.  The settings are designed so that responses
go to the entire list.  There is no special software or interface that you
have to use. If you wish to change topics or ask a new question, please
update the email subject line to identify your topic. This makes it easier
for others to follow the discussion. The moderators will be active during set
times of the e-Forum, but you are welcome to add to the discussion outside of
those times if that works better for your schedule.


News from the Off-Season: some conference cogitations

Happy February!

I’ve just gotten back to work after a five-day weekend. Three of those days were spent at the Ontario Library Association Super Conference, here in Toronto, so, not exactly a vacation, but definitely a change from the 9-5.

Besides a ton of useful tech sessions (including on OpenRefine for data cleaning, Koha [an open-source cataloguing system], and a review of the Google Art Project by some local ARLIS/NA student chapter members), this conference is basically the Canadian answer to ALA and draws 5,000 registrants.

Speaking of, ALA Midwinter happened this past weekend as well, with roughly the same numbers flocking to Chicago. They had Jason Segel as a keynote speaker, while we had Welcome to Night Vale. It’s a toss-up, really.

ALA, of course, being that body that accredits those programs we’re taking, has measurably more weight in the profession. They’re neck-deep in campaigns for governing positions, including someone that champions lowering the admission rates to MLIS/MI programs to compensate for the underemployment problem, and someone who thinks librarians are “the best profession in the world.” Sigh. (You can see the debate recording here.) If you’re an ALA member, I strongly suggest you vote in the elections.

A hot topic in both conferences was the new information literacy standards being passed by the ACRL — or, rather, the Framework, as the new concepts are being billed. I did some ranting about this subject a while ago, but I’ll remind you that the ACRL Visual Literacy Standards from 2011 were built upon those original IL standards, which means we should expect a VL-specific interpretation of the Framework in the near future. I have been trying to mull over what those will entail, but, it’s been a busy winter so far. I’d love to hear about your ideas, in the comments! (My first guess is going to be a threshold concept of “the realization that you’re committing copyright infringement basically every time you go online.”)

Meanwhile, back in Toronto, I was finding that quite a few of the conference sessions I attended were hard-pressed to name an audience: a curious newbie, or a field specialist? Even sessions with “current trends” in the titles spent the majority of their time rehashing the basics. I definitely valued the technology demonstrations, and the guides to cataloguing in certain metadata schemes, but I think I’m too niche in my interests to find the bulk of presentations at big library conferences to be worthwhile. And some of the most interesting sessions happened concurrently, so I couldn’t sit in on the session on 3D printing and copyright without missing that Google Art Project discussion down the hall.

But on the upside, I got these awesome socks:

“Due Date Card” Library Socks from Out of Print


My Experience at SEI 2014

The following is an essay I completed about my experience at this year’s Summer Educational Institute (SEI), an annual joint venture by VRA and ARLIS/NA. This essay was a condition of my Kress Scholarship award, which made it possible for me to attend the event. Anyone with an interest in digital image management– from students to seasoned professionals– should seriously consider enrolling for the 2015 session!


It was a scene that could have happened anywhere: four people, drinking beers, talking about the Insane Clown Posse. More specifically, about the phenomenon of Juggalos and ICP fandom and the desire to know more about this fascinating subculture (the four people not being Juggalos, or even casual ICP fans, themselves).

Now, it so happens that this scene took place in Champaign, Illinois, at the 2014 Summer Educational Institute. The four people didn’t know each other very well, but were quickly bonding over their shared passion for goofy internet videos and preserving cultural heritage. We wondered: what are the authoritative sources on Juggalo culture? Are scholars or social scientists studying the socioeconomic underpinnings of ICP fandom? Is anyone saving the ephemera of that fandom, or documenting events like the annual Gathering of the Juggalos? “Where are all the Juggalo archivists?!,” we wondered.

This conversation happened in the midst of four rather fascinating and intense days. First off, the setting: for someone who’s always lived on a coast, the immense flatness of the midwest is always a bit jarring. It was a perfect frontier-like setting, though, for exploring relatively new-to-me topics. I found the sessions well-structured, as intellectual property flowed logically into metadata into digitization into preservation into advocacy– a nice framework for getting down & dirty with specifics while keeping sight of the larger visual resource landscape. The instructors were engaging, friendly, and scary knowledgeable about their fields. My favorite part, though (besides eating at Woorijib restaurant– seriously, the best Korean food i have EVER had) was the chance to meet colleagues from all over the U.S. Spending time with dozens of smart, passionate, and downright awesome people is high on my list of likes, and the fact that we all share a profession is pretty wonderful.

sei2014GroupPhoto

SEI 2014 attendees. Photo courtesy of the SEI 2014 website, http://sei2014.org/past-seis/pictures/.

The overall excellence of the week aside, it was still the Juggalo conversation that crystallized for me powerful shift in how I think about my work that was influenced by my SEI experience. When I began my current job, it was clear that one of my first orders of business was VR housekeeping. There were files to sort (both digital and physical), workflows to design, and a lot of baseline visual resource management principles to learn. While I was able to give myself a few crash courses on that last issue, it wasn’t until SEI that I was able to systematically, and holistically, think about the task at hand. Following my return I have improved our file organization practices, put some baseline preservation methods in place, began to think more carefully about the metadata I apply to image files when cataloging, and doubled down on my efforts to comply with digitization standards (an uphill task for someone without a photography or image editing background!).

More vital, though, is that shift I mentioned. Now that I’ve been in my position for almost a year, I am beginning to feel more confident in work I’m doing and the decisions I’ve made regarding our VR collection. Essential to this is the way I learned to think about creating, managing, sharing, and preserving the collection. Rather than envisioning mythological figures with shovels and stables or boulders and hills, I am now able to see my work in VR as more elegantly integrated with the other half of my job: research assistance and information/visual literacy instruction. Managing an image collection isn’t a goal in itself. It’s a means of providing our students with tools to improve their practice and learn how to be successful consumers, users, and creators of information both textual and visual. And someday, when I do find that Juggalo archive, I’ll know that the reason those archivists work so hard to preserve the cultural artifacts of ICP fandom is for the users who will study them, and analyze them, and create information that will enlighten those who care to find it.

-Ashley Peterson, Librarian at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston


Guest Post: ACRL 2013: Professional Development Cross-Training

Erin Elzi is a Technical Services Librarian at the Bard Graduate Center: Decorative Arts, Design History, Material Culture in NYC. 

ACRL 2013: Professional Development Cross-Training

The annual ARLIS conference is rapidly closing in, and while I know many of you are gearing up for the first (or third… or 23rd) time, I’ve just returned from ACRL 2013. The theme of the conference was: Imagine, Innovate, Inspire, and I’m feeling just that – Inspired! Innovated! Imaginative! So lend me you ear while I tell you about an important part of professional development: cross-training.

Full disclosure, I’ve never been to the national ARLIS conference. It’s not that I actively avoid it, it’s just that I’ve received full-support, either through the professional development budget-line or via scholarships granted by my MLS school, to attend SLA, CAA, the IA Summit and ACRL. It’s also not that my workplace will not support a trip to ARLIS, but rather that all the other librarians here go to it, so I figure there’s greater benefit to our institution if I attend other conferences.  Cross-training, or the process of stepping outside your daily, specialized frame of reference, helps make you more than an information professional. It makes you an information ninja.  Ninjas are all at once fast, stealthy and powerful. Professional development cross-training does the same thing by strengthening the skills and knowledge you already have, while introducing ideas to help you solve problems or find that perfect tool you need to get a project off the ground.

Fortunately, my institution supports my quest for ninja status, and each year I basically have my pick of which conference to attend. Last year it was the IA Summit, which was relevant at the time, since we were in the initial stages of redesigning our OPAC. Two years ago I attended my first ACRL conference, while I was still a student, under the guises of a press pass (Here’s a tip: Offer to cover a conference for a publication. It may take care of your registration fee and is a great chance to get published!). While I had known going into library school that I wanted to work in academia – the 2011 ACRL conference reinforced that in every way. I tend to feel a bit out of place when it comes to networking-type situations, and let’s be honest – the networking opportunities are a major reason students go to these conferences. But at the ACRL conference, I never once felt out of place, or unwelcome due to my not-quite-professional-yet status. Much the same way the ARLIS-NY goes out of their way to make MLS students here in New York feel all warm and fuzzy and extraordinarily welcome in their chosen profession. Shop around if you’re still in school – you may find your library niche somewhere unexpected, even within the limitless boundaries of the ARLIS realm.

 

Beautiful Subject Analysis Visualization Poster presented by David Polley and Brianna Marshall

Beautiful Subject Analysis Visualization Poster presented by David Polley and Brianna Marshall

What was so innovative and inspiring and imaginative at ACRL this year?  The uber-popular topics this year seemed to be information literacy instruction and data curation.  While the greater part of these sessions addressed the needs of undergraduates, or disciplines in the hard sciences, I still walked away with some new tools and methodologies we can use for our grad-student only population here at the Bard Graduate Center. Including some fun open-source stuff, like new data visualization tools. Including this MOOC, which has finished, but the materials and lectures are still available.

“Digital Humanities” were also all over the place – both literally and figuratively. The ambiguous term found its way into panels and poster sessions covering everything from community building to subject analysis to online exhibitions to ACRL’s very own THATCamp. Digital Humanities are hot, people! And the projects taking place under its umbrella are often multi-media affairs and involve primary sources – things we art information pros tend to know a thing or two about. Get on board!

Omeka DH Poster session presented by Marc Bess of UNC, Charlotte.

Omeka DH Poster session presented by Marc Bess of UNC, Charlotte.

Then there were the sessions that more overtly rubbed elbows with the ARLIS crowd. A few librarians at the University of Michigan are Mapping the Motor City’s Cinemas. Another group at the University of Florida presented on raising collection awareness through online exhibits.  A duo attempting to create a digital collection of street art documentation discussed the inherent challenges with such an undertaking. If sessions that address larger issues are more your thing than individual projects, how about a panel on building metadata to make better surrogates for images and objects (hint – let’s describe the object in our own words and go from there instead of fitting the items into imperfect, existing controlled vocabularies), or how to incorporate feminist pedagogy into any teaching opportunity (which is primarily about decentralizing the classroom). Or one of the many sessions that covered assessment and proving the value of your library – not as sexy a topic as the others, but increasingly important for many institutions.

Of course there’s always room for improvement (ACRL, if you’re listening, we want more sessions on diversity and grad student services!), but there’s also no doubt in my mind that you found at least one thing in this brief ACRL recap that sparked your interest or is applicable to your own professional or scholarly needs. And that’s just a tip of the iceberg – I came back with pages upon pages of notes. Just fathom how much you would get out of attending it yourself!

 

The Honnld/Mudd Library at Claremont College holds a ReBook book arts competition each year. Brilliant!

The Honnld/Mudd Library at Claremont College holds a ReBook book arts competition each year. Brilliant!

So, should you go to ARLIS this year, and the year after that, and the year after that? OF COURSE! But don’t write off other conference opportunities as well. In addition to elevating you to ninja rank, a willingness to attend other conferences can increase your ability to attend anything at all. If you lack institutional support, or if ARLIS never comes to your town, an ALA or ACRL or SAA conference that ends up in a city near you means all you have to pay is the registration fee.  I know I plan on finally making my first ARLIS conference appearance in 2014 – D.C. is just a mere bus ride away from NYC!

If you’re already going to ARLIS as your one professional development opportunity this year, you can still get some cross-training done simply by attending sessions that may not appear to be your forte.  Are you in reference? Join a discussion on authority records! Catalogers, stop by a session on collection development! Architectural archivists, listen in on the panel of fashion bloggers! See, being a ninja is easy!

Oh – and a final lesson I learned at ACRL: if your library doesn’t already have one, get a button maker! Everyone loves a good button, it’s cheap PR, and making them is like chicken soup for the weary researcher, staff member, and even the faculty or curator’s soul. But it looks like ArLiSANP already knew that!


Educational Opportunities!

As always, you can also see what’s coming up through the Educational Opportunities Calendar. Keep reading for details about all the great conferences, CFPs, scholarships and more opportunities below!

SUMMER EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR VISUAL RESOURCES AND IMAGE MANAGEMENT 2013
http://sei.vrafoundation.org
Registration will be opening for The Summer Educational Institute for Visual Resources and Image Management (SEI ) on January 21, 2013. Currently in its tenth year as a joint program between The Art Libraries Society/North America (ARLIS/NA) and the Visual Resources Association Foundation (VRAF), SEI 2013 will be held once again at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor from June
18-21, 2013.
The SEI curriculum is suited to information professionals new to the
field, as well as more experienced professionals eager to respond to fast-changing technological advancements and job requirements. Individuals serving in a range of professional roles have
benefitted from past SEIs, including visual resources professionals,
university and public librarians, archivists, and museum professionals
responsible for image rights and reproductions. Reduced tuition is offered to VRA and ARLIS/NA members.
This intensive workshop specifically addresses the requirements of today’s professional. Expert instructors will cover intellectual property rights, digital imaging, metadata and cataloging,
the essential tools of image management, and how to expand your
professional role. Attendees will also have an opportunity to discuss and
brainstorm on a range of issues, from new media and marketing visual
resources to professional development and future career roles.
Any questions? Contact the SEI co-chairs Betha Whitlow (bwhitlow@wustl.edu) and
Amy Trendler (aetrendler@bsu.edu) with questions.

The Art Libraries Society/North America (ARLIS/NA) and the Visual Resources Association Foundation (VRAF) are pleased to announce the Samuel H. Kress Foundation Summer Educational Institute Scholarships for SEI 2013.

The Samuel H. Kress Foundation, http://www.kressfoundation.org/, has generously agreed to sponsor five scholarships for the 2013 ARLIS/NA-VRAF Summer Educational Institute for Visual Resources and Image Management.  SEI 2013 will be held at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, MI, June 18-21, 2013. The intensive three and a half-day workshop will feature a curriculum that specifically addresses the requirements of today’s information professional, and will include hands-on and lecture modules At SEI 2013, expert instructors will cover intellectual property rights, digital imaging, metadata and cataloging, the essential tools of image management, and how to expand your professional role. Attendees will also have an opportunity to discuss and brainstorm on a range of issues, from new media and marketing visual resources to professional development and future career roles, during the interactive session planned for the final morning of SEI.

 Kress Summer Educational Institute Scholarship recipients will each receive $770 for tuition, room, and incidentals. If you are interested in applying for a Samuel H. Kress Foundation Summer Educational Institute Scholarship, information can be found on the SEI 2013 website: http://sei.vrafoundation.org/kress2013.html

The ARLIS/NA Travel Awards Committee is pleased to announce the following Travel Awards for attending annual Conference of ARLIS/NA, to be held April 25-29th in Pasadena, CA.
Details about the conference can be found here: http://www.arlisna.org/pasadena2013/
For more information about the Travel Awards, and to access the application form, please visit: http://www.arlisna.org/about/awards/awards_index.html
The application form can be found at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/2013travel
Several awards are available to students and non-ARLIS members.  Please feel free to send this announcement to others who might benefit from attending our wonderful conference!
Application deadline for all awards listed below: January 31st, 2013, 11:59pm EST.

CALL FOR PRESENTERS: ACRL ARTS SECTION’S ANNUAL DISCUSSION FORUM SATURDAY, JUNE 29, 2013

Are you doing research in the arts that you would like to share with fellow librarians?  Is there something you’re doing at your library dealing with the arts that you think others should know about? If so, the ACRL Arts section invites you to submit a presentation proposal for our Discussion Forum to be held on Saturday, June 29th from 10:30-11:30 during theALA Annual Conference in Chicago.

  • Presentations can be on any topic pertaining to the arts or design (see list of possible topics below). It can be a project that you are currently working on or research you are engaged in.
  • There is no requirement for presenters to be Arts Section members to participate. Students are also encouraged to make a submission.
  • Each presentation will be 15-20 minutes with a short Q&A after.

Please email your proposals to Yvette Cortes (ycortes@skidmore.edu). The deadline for submissions is Friday, March 8th. Chosen presenters will be notified shortly after.

Possible topics:

  • ·        Developments in the display and/or preservation of arts materials
  • ·        Innovative information literacy or visual literacy techniques with arts students
  • ·        Emerging technologies in arts libraries
  • ·        Inventive collection management and development in the arts
  • ·        Strategies for reaching out to arts users (students and faculty)
  • ·        Copyright and fair use in the arts environment
  • ·        Evaluating the needs of arts users
  • ·        Use of images in information literacy instruction
  • ·        Creative physical or online/virtual exhibits

If you have questions, please contact me.

Yvette Cortes
Chair, ACRL Arts Section Publications & Research Committee

 


Upcoming professional development opportunities

As always, you can also see what’s coming up through the Educational Opportunities Calendar. Keep reading for details about all the great webinars, CFPs, and more opportunities below!

 

Adventures in International Librarianship: Living and Working Outside of the United States

Are you interested in finding a job in library and information science outside of North America? Are you curious about what it’s like to live and work in a different culture? If so, please join us for a ELIME-hosted online panel discussion on Tuesday 6 November! Our panelists represent an incredible variety of experiences, and have worked all over the world from Switzerland to Azerbaijan to Japan.

You have two opportunities to attend. The first session will take place at 9am EST, and the second at noon EST. Note that the panelists are different for each session, so you could even attend both for a wider perspective. For more information:http://elime.web.unc.edu/interlib/

 

Call for Proposals: ACRL Image Resources Interest Group ALA Mid-Winter Meeting (held online)

The Association of College and Research Libraries Image Resources Interest Group is accepting proposals for our Mid-Winter meeting, to be held online (using Adobe Connect) on Thurs. Feb. 14, 2013, at 1:30 p.m. CST.

We are seeking proposals for presentations, of about 30 minutes in length, to be followed by questions/answers. Suggested topics include:

Image metadata

Project planning with images

Geolocation metadata

Image collections across systems and platforms

Collaboration with academic departments/community outreach

Visual literacy standards implementation

Digital capture

We are interested in all aspects of image resources and look forward to varied presentations and creative projects.

Please submit proposals or questions to robin.leech@okstate.edu. Proposal deadline is Nov. 30, 2012. Proposals need to include:

Name

Institution

Address

City/State/Zip

Phone

Email

Proposal Title

Brief proposal description (150 words or less)

Expected outcomes

Submitters will be notified by the week of Dec. 10th, 2012.

Please visit https://sites.google.com/site/acrlirig/ for additional information.

 

The ACRL Arts Section is seeking contributors for the Seattle ArtsGuide for the upcoming 2013 ALA Midwinter Conference! The ArtsGuide is a semi-annual guide and customized Google Map developed by theACRL Arts Section’s Publications & Research Committee to help ALA conference attendees find arts-related venues and events in and around host cities. You do not have to be a member to be a contributor, but it’s a great opportunity to get involved with the ACRL Arts Section. It’s also a fun way to contribute your knowledge of the area to enhance everyone’s conference experience! You can see previous ArtsGuides here:

http://www.ala.org/acrl/aboutacrl/directoryofleadership/sections/arts/artswebsite/artsguide/artsguides

Please let me know which section you’re interested in contributing to:

Visual Arts & Museums

Galleries

Architecture

Dance

Music

Theater

Submissions would be due by December 3, 2012. If you’re interested please contact me as soon as possible.

Yvette Cortes

Chair, ACRL Arts Section’s Publications & Research Committee

ycortes@skidmore.edu

 

“Introduction to Spatial Literacy and Online Mapping”

You may use tools like Google Maps in your personal life all the time for locating restaurants and local businesses, driving directions or planning trips via public transportation, but have you considered how this same technology could be used at your library to improve library services? RUSA’s online course “Introduction to Spatial Literacy and Online Mapping” is the perfect opportunity for librarians and library staff from public and academic libraries to gain a basic understanding of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology and learn about specific technologies they may be exposed to at the library. Registration for this course, which runs Nov. 5-25, ends on Thursday, Nov. 1.

REGISTER ONLINE NOW: http://www.ala.org/Template.cfm?Section=oloc&Template=/Conference/ConferenceList.cfm&ConferenceTypeCode=L

If you’ve already taken this introductory course or have a good working knowledge of GIS and want to go further, consider enrolling in “Spatial Literacy II: Incorporation of Maps and GIS”, which shows you how to harness these technologies for reference work, library projects, library administration, collection delivery, instruction, outreach and library promotion. The next session of this course begins Dec. 3.

Wouldn’t it be awesome if several of your staff could take this course and your library could reap the benefits in improved library services? Group discounts are available! Rates for two or more registrants from the same library, library network or library system start at $110 per person.

Learn more about all of our courses and webinars at the RUSA online learning page: http://www.ala.org/rusa/development/onlinece

Register online now for this and other upcoming RUSA courses:

http://www.ala.org/Template.cfm?Section=oloc&Template=/Conference/ConferenceList.cfm&ConferenceTypeCode=L

Questions about registration? Contact registration@ala.org or (800) 545-2433, option 5.

 

 


Educational Opportunities!!!

 

Lots this week! Let’s start with the one that happens tomorrow:

 

LYRASIS Ideas & Insights Webinar

Join us for our upcoming LYRASIS Ideas & Insights<http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?e=001wCQICMGo7AWgGpHKHAUJbkAv_Ah2nboVNI-UWKPZJAPpze3PnLinLO67Lga2TY4lHvX2IpRSMrpXQu8KzxX-H6-xtZc34cSlmhtanK2OXSuZqyLnrlgvAkNQsYfIdVod-5Ud9npxR1yOuj0F3VWWPDt5YYtP2Nn8yLRcPkuLj1s=> webinar, Libraries are Boundless<http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?e=001wCQICMGo7AWgGpHKHAUJbkAv_Ah2nboVNI-UWKPZJAPpze3PnLinLO67Lga2TY4lHvX2IpRSMrpXQu8KzxX-H6-xtZc34cSlxrw2Prfvym6JfjqEpJ-21hVhSqfAIvkelP00Y-6-hl6MnhrOPXNjsGkzSsRcEW0-sGic_8En9xYjM-JGC3RA4XbUnd5RP2QfLaNLbMzgLpM=
> and hear how information organizations are challenging traditional ideas about space in libraries, and placing collections, staff and resources in the best possible position to meet user needs – in the cloud, in the digital realm, on site and online – into the future.

Libraries are Boundless<http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?e=001wCQICMGo7AWgGpHKHAUJbkAv_Ah2nboVNI-UWKPZJAPpze3PnLinLO67Lga2TY4lHvX2IpRSMrpXQu8KzxX-H6-xtZc34cSlxrw2Prfvym6JfjqEpJ-21vh9PpD1BSYOXcdnPztwK6y1C91kkkXMsfLjUaYAUOhKf4Wu0RMfp7JruiRuymVSb1rNrzX72hyanmAfxzSTTAk=>
June 15, 2012
11 a.m. – 4 p.m. ET

Click here to register<http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?e=001wCQICMGo7AWgGpHKHAUJbkAv_Ah2nboVNI-UWKPZJAPpze3PnLinLO67Lga2TY4lHvX2IpRSMrpXQu8KzxX-H6-xtZc34cSlxrw2Prfvym6JfjqEpJ-21gnDBS_4yvLljnPqKUdbUg-XV0iqH51ZrQSTrtejc9RK1JPGVCSDNqpm_WV2OfGRCRROq6tRRet7uiU95OU-u7U=>

Speakers include:

*   Stacie Ledden and Logan Macdonald, AnyThink Libraries, Rangeview Library District, CO: Creating an Experience Library
*   Chad Nelson and Barbara Petersohn, Georgia State University: The Care and Feeding of Digital Collections
*   Dr. Curtis R. Rogers, State Library of South Carolina: Social Media, Libraries, and Web 2.0: How American Libraries are Using New Tools for Public Relations and to Attract New Users

New Book Information Literacy Beyond Library 2.0

CHICAGO — In the three years since the publication of the best-selling “Information Literacy Meets Library 2.0,” the information environment has changed dramatically, becoming increasingly dominated by the social and the mobile.

The new book “Information Literacy Beyond Library 2.0” picks up the conversation, asking the big questions facing those who teach information literacy: where have we come from, where are we now, and where are we going.

Presenting answers from a range of contributors, editors Peter Godwin and Jo Parker divide their book into three distinct sections. Part 1 explores the most recent trends in technology, consumption and literacy, while Part 2 is a resource bank of international case studies that demonstrate the key trends and their effect on information literacy, offering numerous innovative ideas that can be put into practice. Part 3 assesses the impact of these changes on librarians and what skills and knowledge they must acquire to evolve alongside their users.  Among the key topics explored are:

  • The evolution of “online” into the social Web as mainstream;
  • How social media tools are used in information literacy;
  • The impact of mobile devices on information literacy delivery;
  • Shifting literacies, such as metaliteracy, transliteracy and media literacy, and their effect on information literacy.

Anyone charged with developing and delivering information literacy programs, as well as library professionals concerned with library instruction and digital technologies, will find the information in this book stimulating and useful.

Godwin is academic liaison librarian at the University of Bedfordshire, UK and Parker is the head of information literacy at the Open University Library, UK.

Source and Fulltext Available At

[ http://ref-notes.blogspot.com/2012/06/new-book-information-literacy-beyond.html ]

 

Registration is now open for the 2nd Annual Summer Retreat for Librarians at Chapman University’s Leatherby Libraries!

Date: Friday, June 29, 2012
Time: 9am – 3pm
Place: Chapman University’s Leatherby Libraries in Orange, California Website (for more information and to register): http://www1.chapman.edu/library/teaching/
Vision: The summer teaching retreat at Chapman University’s Leatherby Libraries was created to build community amongst instruction librarians and library school students from Orange County and the surrounding areas. The retreat provides unique and practical presentations. Participants have opportunities to share teaching experiences, ideas, and resources during lively break-out sessions as the practices and innovative ideas of local librarians are discovered. Ideally, participants leave the retreat with a larger network of resources and contacts, as well as inspiration to creatively expand their library instruction repertoire.
Retreat Schedule and Presentation Descriptions: http://www1.chapman.edu/library/teaching/schedule.html

The deadline to register is June 15. Registration will be capped at 80 participants and is on a first-come-first-serve basis.

Please direct questions on registration to Wenling Tseng at tseng@chapman.edu or 714-532-7720.

General questions on the retreat may be directed to Annie Knight (aknight@chapman.edu  or 714-532-7736) or Stacy Russo (russo_stacy@sac.edu or 714-564-6712).

 

International Conference on Trends in Knowledge and Information Dynamics
10-13 July, 2012

Hosted by
Documentation Research and Training Centre (DRTC)
Indian Statistical Institute (ISI)
http://drtc.isibang.ac.in/ictk

Venue: NIMHANS Convention Center, Nimhans Hospital Premises, Hosur Road,
Bangalore- 560029

Documentation Research and Training Centre (DRTC) established by Prof. S R
Ranganathan in 1962, is a research centre at Indian Statistical Institute (ISI)
conducting Research, Training and Higher Education in the field Library and
Information Sciences  and allied  areas. In the last five decades, DRTC has
been involved in Research, Education, Training and cutting edge applications of
Information and Communication Technology to Libraries and Information Centres,
Knowledge centers and systems. 2012 marks the Golden Jubilee of DRTC and we are
happy to host as part of ‘Golden Jubilee Celebrations’, the ‘International
Conference on Trends in Knowledge and Information Dynamics’ (ICTK-2012).

Broadly the themes of the conference are divided into main streams (in parallel
sessions on all the days of the conference):
Stream 1: Trends in Library Education and Research
Stream 2: Trends in Public Library Services
Stream 3: Trends in Domain Specific Information Systems and Services
Stream 4: Trends in Open Access to Information and Data
Stream 5: Trends in ICT applications to Library and Information Science
For details visit us on  http://drtc.isibang.ac.in/ictk/subthemes

ICTK 2012 includes sessions of invited talks by renowned in the field of
Library and Information Science from around the globe on various topics related
to the above mentioned five streams covering various aspects of current
interest and popular trends. The conference serves as an International
Platforms for dissemination of information of International research and
collaborative projects such as European Commission infrastructure projects.
Experts Panel on Open Access to Information and Public Libraries present
experts’ views from around the world. In addition to plenary spearker of
International repute, we plan to have panel discussions on Higher Education and
International Collaborative Research in LIS, Public Libraries, Agricultural
Information Systems, Open Access to Information

List of invited speakers

Dr. Jagdish Arora
INFLIBNET
India

Dr. Roberto Barbero
INFN
Italy
Dr. Donatella Castelli
CNR-ISTI,
Italy

Prof. Fausto Giunchiglia,
University of Trento
Italy
Dr. Johannes Keizer
UN-FAO
Rome

Prof. Dr. Norbert Lossau
Goettingen State and University Library
Germany
Dr. Alberto Masoni
INFN
Rome

Dr. Carlos Morais Pires,
European Commission,
Brussels
Dr. Federico Ruggieri
INFN
Rome

Dr. Alma Swan
Key Perspectives Ltd,
Truro, UK
Prof. Anna Maria Tammaro
University of Parma
Italy
Dr. Stuart Wiebel
Senior Research Scientist, OCLC
USA

Last date of registration : 30 June 2012
Details of registration  at http://drtc.isibang.ac.in/ictk/registration

Contact

Prof. A.R.D. Prasad (Convener – ICTK-2012)
Documentation Research & Training Centre (DRTC),
Indian Statistical Institute (I.S.I),
8th Mile, Mysore Road, R.V. College Post,
Bangalore – 560 059, Karnataka INDIA
Phone: +91-80-2848 2711
Fax : 91-80-2848 4265
E-mail ID: ictk2012@drtc.isibang.ac.in

 

Registration closes on Sunday, June 17 for the next offering of RUSA’s online course “Introduction to Spatial Literacy and Online Mapping”.

This asynchronous course will run June 18-July 8.
Group registration rates are available for 2 or more registrants from the same library, library system or network–more information here: http://www.ala.org/rusa/development/onlinece

Register online now for this class: http://www.ala.org/Template.cfm?Section=oloc&Template=/Conference/ConferenceList.cfm&ConferenceTypeCode=L

This three week course will introduce students and library staff to a variety of mapping tools and GIS technologies that are of interest to both public and academic library users. Librarians will be able to apply their newly developed Web 2.0 mapping skills in their reference work, and liaison responsibilities. Through hands-on exercises, demonstrations and presentations, the librarian will receive a thorough overview of GIS-related technologies that they may be exposed to in the library.

Instructor: Eva Dodsworth, geospatial data services librarian at the University of Waterloo Map Library in Waterloo, Ontario

Questions about registration? Contact registration@ala.org or 800-545-2433, option 5. Questions about the course? Contact RUSA Web Manager Andrea Hill at ahill@ala.org.

 

RUSA 101 Online

Are you interested in any of the following?

Frontline reference

Readers advisory

Collection development

Emerging technologies in reference

Specialized business reference

Genealogical research

Managing local history collections

Interlibrary loan and resource sharing

Reference and outreach to special populations

If you said YES to any of the above, there’s a place in RUSA for you!

Find out more about RUSA, the Reference and User Services Association, at RUSA 101.
You’ll learn about what RUSA and its sections do, how to get involved, how to stay informed in our activities, and get any of your RUSA questions answered.
RUSA 101 Online
No registration required! Feel free to drop in to any of the sessions below.
Access information can be found at the bottom of this email.
·         Friday, June 1, 10:00am-11:00am PT/12:00pm-1:00pm CT/1:00pm-2:00pm ET
·         Wednesday, June 6, 1:00pm-2:00pm PT/3:00pm-4:00pm CT/4:00pm-5:00pm ET
·         Monday, June 11, 10:00am-11:00am PT/12:00pm-1:00pm CT/1:00pm-2:00pm ET
·         Friday, June 15, 1:00pm-2:00pm PT/3:00pm-4:00pm CT/4:00pm-5:00pm ET
·         Monday, June 18, 10:00am-11:00am PT/12:00pm-1:00pm CT/1:00pm-2:00pm ET
RUSA 101 @ ALA Annual 2012
No registration required! Besides having an opportunity to learn more about RUSA and meet RUSA members, we’ll have raffle prizes!
·         Friday, June 22, 2012 || 3:00pm -4:00pm
Hilton Anaheim – Oceanside Room
Access Information for RUSA 101 Online
To get the most out of your web conference experience, it is best to use a headset. If you do not have a headset, please use headphones/earbuds to plug into your speaker. This will eliminate audio issues.
Session URL: https://sas.elluminate.com/m.jnlp?password=M.F71930E6E64800139C18D122D0C4DD&sid=2011689

 

ALA Conference Mentors and Mentees

For mentees:

Calling all students, new professionals, and first time ALA Annual Conference attendees! Would you like to meet with an experienced ALA conference representative while attending your first ALA Annual Conference in Anaheim, CA? If so, The New Members Round Table (NMRT) of ALA is sponsoring a conference mentoring program that will pair new attendees with people who have attended more ALA Annual Conferences.

Please fill out the following questionnaire to participate. A member of the NMRT Mentoring Committee will be in touch with information about your match. It is up to you to connect with your match and set up time(s) to meet while at the conference.

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dDZSQTFIUWZvQWtnaHlJOFFYX3ZhdEE6MQ#gid=0

Questions? Email: NMRT_Mentoring@yahoo.com

For mentors:

Have you attended a couple of ALA Conferences and want to give back to the next generation of librarians? If so, The New Members Round Table (NMRT) of ALA is sponsoring a conference mentoring program that will pair new attendees with people who have attended more ALA Annual Conferences.

Please fill out the following questionnaire to participate. A member of the NMRT Mentoring Committee will be in touch with information about your match. It is up to you to connect with your match and set up time(s) to meet while at the conference.

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dEhhMWhJVkZmWnVzQmk2b1ZZbGcwUGc6MQ#gid=0

Questions? Email: NMRT_Mentoring@yahoo.com

 

IMHO > Two *Most Excellent* Keynotes from the recent IATUL conference in Singapore

1 >  Libraries, Technocentricity and Learning : Changes in Learning, Research and Information Needs and Behavior of Users

Prof. Rakesh Kumar (The University of New South Wales, Australia)

http://ref-notes.blogspot.com/2012/06/libraries-technocentricity-and-learning.html

2 > Technology & Innovations in Libraries and Their Impact on Learning, Research and Users

Joe Murphy (Librarian, Trend Spotter / Trend Setter & IMHO: Librarian Extradordinaire)

http://ref-notes.blogspot.com/2012/06/iatul-keynote-2-technology-innovations.html

BTW: There was a 3rd Keynote titled _Trends, Possibilities and Scenarios for User-Centred Libraries_ by Dr. Susan Gibbons, University Librarian, Yale University, but there is a known problem with the A/V [:-(]

Note-1: Each A/V link also links to the video poster sessions …

and

Note-2: Each post includes links to other presentation / sessions titles and speakers …

How are libraries using both physical and virtual spaces to meet the needs and demands of library users?

Libraries are changing from spaces where we “marc and park” volumes of print material into more vibrant and vital organizations that focus on both internal and external access to services and information.

 

ShareAcademy

The 3rd annual ShareAcademy will be held on Tuesday, August 7th, 2012 at the CPCC Harris campus in Charlotte, NC.  The theme for this year’s ShareAcademy is:

“Under New Management: Adventures in Leadership”

2nd CALL FOR PROPOSALS: Share with us your challenges, joys, reflections, techniques, skills and eye-opening moments about becoming a better, more efficient, more productive leader and manager.  What habits or tricks have you learned or utilized to manage yourself, your time or your staff?  How have you identified your strengths and skills and used them to your best advantage?
Workshop proposals are expected to be interactive, hands-on, and engaging for participants.

Call for proposals CLOSES: June 22
ShareAcademy Registration OPENS: June 26

*ShareAcademy is created and hosted by CPCC Library, but is open to anyone interested in the conference theme.  Our primary goal is to provide a conference full of practical, hands-on material for its attendees.*

Submit your proposal here!  http://www.cpcc.edu/library/shareacademy

ARLIS/NA Reviews

The coeditors for ARLIS/NA Reviews (http://www.arlisna.org/pubs/reviews/index.html) are seeking reviewers for the September/October 2012 edition.

You must notify one of the coeditors by no later than Friday, June 15 of your interest in reviewing one of the titles listed below.  Please note in your response if your subject background or expertise matches the subject matter of the book.  Also, you must be able to meet an August 3, 2012 deadline with a 450 word review.

How a Revolutionary Art Became Official Culture: Murals, Museums, and the Mexican State,by Mary K. Coffey

Iroquois Art, Power, and History, by Neal B. Keating

Replacing Home: From Primordial Hut to Digital Network in Contemporary Art, by Jennifer Johung

Spatialities: The Geographies of Art and Architecture, ed. by Judith Rugg and Craig Martin

Doug Litts & Terrie Wilson
littsd@si.edu / wilso398@mail.lib.msu.edu
ARLIS/NA Reviews Co-Editors

 

CHArt 28TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE
Consume: Respond – Digital Engagement with Art
**The CHArt committee has extended the deadline for proposals to June 20, 2012.

 

 

Thursday 15 – Friday 16 November 2012, Central London venue TBC

Since its foundation in 1985 CHArt has engaged in topical issues in
Digital Art History. This year CHArt is looking at how new developments in information and communications technology affect the ways in which we engage with art. New forms of digital display or emerging modes of viewing art may have profound effects on both our understanding of the artwork itself (the way we consume it) and our ability or appetite for describing, curating and managing it (how we respond to it).

CHArt invites papers that examine emerging practice and where it impacts upon digital art practice, research and curation. Areas for consideration include:

* Control of authorship, ownership and access
* Collaboration and the interdisciplinary break-down
* Participation, quick response and interaction
* Consumption, re-use and mashup
* Mobile technology, apps and education
* Connections between art, interface design, usability and user experience
* Globalisation, agility, dissemination and big data
* Liquidity and permeability of digital culture

Contributions are welcome from all sections of the CHArt community: art historians, artists, architects and architectural theorists and historians, philosophers, curators, conservators, scientists, cultural and media theorists, archivists, technologists and educationalists.

Submissions should be in the form of a 300-400 word synopsis of the proposed paper with brief biographical information (no more than 200 words) of presenter/s, and should be emailed tochart@kcl.ac.uk<mailto:chart@kcl.ac.uk > by Friday, June 1st
Wednesday, June 20th 2012. Please note that submissions exceeding the stated
word count will not be considered.

Postgraduate students are encouraged to submit a proposal. CHArt is able to offer assistance with the conference fees for up to four student delegates. Priority will be given to students whose papers are accepted for presentation. An application form and proof of university enrolment will be required. For further details about the Helene Roberts Bursary please email anna.bentkowska@kcl.ac.uk<mailto:anna.bentkowska@kcl.ac.uk >.

CFP: Digital Frontiers

The deadline for submissions for Digital Frontiers – a conference and THATCamp for and about the diverse communities using digital tools for research, teaching, and learning – is fast approaching. Please send us proposals for individual papers, fully-constituted panels, posters, and THATCamp workshops! (Apologies for cross-posting – we’re just really excited to see your submissions!)  Check out the CFP below or visit https://digitalfrontiers.unt.edu

The University of North Texas Libraries and The Portal to Texas History invite proposals for Digital Frontiers, a conference on using digital resources for research, teaching, and learning.

Digital libraries provide unprecedented access to a wide array materials. This has dramatically expanded the possibilities of primary source research in the humanities and related fields. We seek submissions of individual papers, fully-constituted panels, workshops or posters based on research using digitized objects, whether they are hosted on the University of North Texas Libraries’ Portal to Texas History or are from other digital repositories.

We encourage contributions from scholars, educators, genealogists, archivists, technologists, librarians, and students. The goals of this conference are to bring a broad community of users together to share their work and to explore the value and the impact that digital resources have on education and research.
Possible Topics

•     Specific ways digital libraries have impacted research
•     Digital tools for conducting research – data and text mining, data
visualization
•     Using digital collections in K-12, undergraduate, and graduate
curricula
•     Using digital libraries for research on any of the following topics:
African-American history / Asian-American history / agriculture and animal husbandry / cartography, mapping, and GIS / civil rights movements / Civil War / collaboration in public humanities projects / electronic and born-digital art / feminism and women’s issues / genealogy and family histories / history and digitization of regional newspapers / history of religions and religious institutions / immigration and migration / Latino/a & Chicano/a histories / local history / LGBT history / military and veteran’s history / digital resources in museums and libraries / music recordings and performance / myths, urban and local legends, and folklore / Native American history / oral histories and personal narratives / photography and visual arts / regional authors / slavery and abolition / state and local politics / Texana and regional literature /

Proposal Types
Digital Frontiers is accepting proposals for:
•     Individual papers (20 minutes)
•     Panels (75 minutes – 3 individual papers + discussion)
•     Roundtable discussions (75 minutes – 5-7 speakers + discussion)
•     THATCamp workshop or tutorial (2 hours)
•     Poster (36” x 48”)

Submissions

•     E-mail proposals or inquiries to digitalfrontiers@unt.edu
•     Abstracts should be no more than 250 words in length; proposals for
fully constituted panels or roundtables should include abstracts for each presentation.
•     Please provide a brief professional bio and specify any A/V or other
technical needs with your proposal.

Conference Deadlines

•     June 15, 2012: proposals due
•     June 30, 2012: notification of acceptance
•     September 21, 2012: Conference
•     September 22, 2012: THATCAMP


Webinar, virtual pre-conference, conference sign-up

See educational opportunities, such as CFP, workshops, events, webinars, etc.? Please email Braegan Abernethy (bcabernethy[at]gmail[dot]com) or Emilee Mathews (mathewse[at]indiana[dot]edu) to get them posted here.

For ongoing opportunities and deadlines, please visit the new Educational Opportunities Calendar.

Free Webinar > Copyright Series: Interview with Cable Green, Creative Commons

May 24, 2011 (Thursday) at 2:00 pm ET

Guest: Cable Green, Director of Global Learning, Creative Commons

Registration Link Available Via

[ http://bit.ly/L7ozAS ]

ALCTS ALA Annual preconference: “The How and Why of Research: What Is the Rock in Your Shoe?”
June 12 – 14, 2012.

All sessions begin at 2 p.m. Eastern, 1 p.m. Central and 11 a.m. Pacific time.

This virtual preconference provides insight and guidance into the world of research, encouraging attendees to discover the research possibilities inherent in their daily work.  Find out how valid research questions can grow out of practical professional quandaries.  Learn how to choose appropriate questions to investigate, how to design effective research strategies and explore avenues for sharing results with colleagues.  Demystify the research process and be encouraged  to contribute to the body of knowledge in the discipline.  This virtual preconference is aimed at librarians entering the profession and/or new to the research process.

This virtual preconference is comprised of three one-hour sessions:

Tuesday, June 12
“Avoiding the Research Rubbish Bin: How to Begin a Research Project” with Allyson Carlyle,  University of Washington Information School.

Wednesday, June 13
“From Curiosity to Concept: Developing a Research Plan from Everyday Library Issues” with Steven A. Knowlton, University of Memphis.

Thursday, June 14
“Bringing your Work to Press: The Peer Review Process” with Sandy Roe, Illinois State University and editor, Cataloging and Classification Quarterly.

Visit the “How and Why” page on the ALCTS website.

Registration is open now.  Individual sessions for each preconference are $39 for ALCTS members, $49 for non-members, $99 for groups and, as always, free to LIS students.  A discounted rate is available if you want to register for all the sessions included in each preconference:  $95 for ALCTS members, $118 for non-members and $258 for groups.  Register through ALA Online Learning.

If you have any questions, please contact Julie Reese, ALCTS Continuing Education, jreese@ala.org.

Joint Conference of Librarians of Color early bird registration closes at midnight June 13
Early bird registration for the Joint Conference of Librarians of Color (JCLC), Sept. 19-23 in Kansas City, Mo., closes Wednesday June 13.
JCLC is a conference for everyone—with engaging speakers, special events and more than 70 concurrent sessions exploring issues of diversity in libraries and how they affect the ethnic communities who use our services!  Early bird registration provides attendees with the best rates for this exciting event.  For complete details, visit http://jclc-conference.org.
JCLC is an experience like no other! Emmy® winner Sonia Manzano, voted one of the most influential Hispanics byPeople en Espanol for her work playing Maria on “Sesame Street,” will welcome attendees at the opening keynote.  Author, director and activist Jamal Joseph will join JCLC as the closing general session speaker.  There will be numerous opportunities to network and socialize, including an opening reception at the beautiful Kansas City Public Library’s central branch.
Under the theme, “Gathering at the Waters: Celebrating Stories and Embracing Communities,” JCLC provides a unique setting for learning with three pre-conferences and more than 70 concurrent sessions in five tracks—Advocacy, Outreach and Collaboration; Collections, Programs and Services; Deep Diversity and Cultural Exchange; Leadership, Management and Organizational Development; and Technology and Innovation.  Author luncheons will allow attendees to get up close and personal with award-winning authors, including Lauren Myracle, Sharon Flake, Da Chen and David Treuer.  A busy exhibit hall will feature the latest from library vendors and partners.
The Crown Center, the city within a city located in the heart of downtown Kansas City, will offer attendees the luxurious accommodations of the Westin Kansas City and Sheraton Kansas City, along with three levels of great shopping, dining and entertainment.  Hotel rates start at $139.
JCLC is sponsored by the five associations of ethnic librarians—the American Indian Library Association (AILA), the Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association (APALA), the Black Caucus of the American Library Association (BCALA), the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA) and REFORMA, the National Association to Promote Library and Information Services to Latinos and the Spanish Speaking.  The first Joint Conference was held in Dallas in 2006.
More information may be found at http://jclc-conference.org.


CFPs, Webinars, and more! This week’s Educational Opportunities

See educational opportunities, such as CFP, workshops, events, webinars, etc.? Please email Braegan Abernethy (bcabernethy[at]gmail[dot]com) or Emilee Mathews (mathewse[at]indiana[dot]edu) to get them posted here.

For ongoing opportunities and deadlines, please visit the new Educational Opportunities Calendar.

ALCTS webinar: Archival Materials: Using RDA with DACS
Date: May 30, 2012
All webinars are one hour in length and begin at 11am Pacific, noon Mountain, 1pm Central, and 2pm Eastern time.
Description: Overview of RDA provisions related to archival collections, including both bibliographic and authority records. Explores the possible connections between RDA and Describing Archives: A Content Standard (DACS), and their potential application as supplementary standards.
Who Should Attend? Attendees should have some understanding of archival cataloging practices and a desire to learn more about archival cataloging rules.
For additional information and links to registration, please click on the following link:
http://www.ala.org/alcts/confevents/upcoming/webinar/cat/053012

ARLIS/NA Pasadena Conference 2013: CALL FOR PROPOSALS – Papers, Sessions and Workshops

Proposals for Papers, Sessions and Workshops are now being accepted for The 41st Annual Conference of the Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA) to be held on April 25-29, 2013 in Pasadena, California. We welcome submissions from librarians, visual and media resource specialists, archivists, curators, museum professionals, educators, artists, designers, architects, historians, researchers, practitioners and others.

The submission deadline is Friday June 22, 2012.

The conference theme, Crafting Our Future, is inspired by Pasadena’s renowned arts and crafts heritage and emphasizes the importance of building upon our past as we actively shape the future of art librarianship.
Individuals and groups are invited to submit proposals that will elicit critical exchange and debate and support opportunities for interaction between participants, as well as those that offer practical advice and solutions to the many challenges facing the profession.
Further information regarding papers, sessions, and workshops can be found within the detailed online submission forms.
Call for Proposals – Papers and Sessions, online submission form: www.surveymonkey.com/s/PAS2013PapersSessions
Call for Proposals – Workshops, online submission form: www.surveymonkey.com/s/PAS2013Workshops

Crafting proposals: Pasadena and beyond
Friday, May 25, 2012
2PM Eastern | 1PM Central | 12PM Mountain | 11AM Pacific
*Chat URL to be announced the morning of May 25th on ARLIS-L*
Guests:
Sarah Sherman, Getty Research Institute; 2013 Conference Program Co-Chair
Cathy Billings, Brandy Library & Art Center; 2013 Conference Program Co-Chair
Nedda Ahmed, Georgia State University
Tony White, Maryland Institute College of Art
Moderator: Emilee Mathews, Indiana University; ARLISNAP Education Liaison
ARLISNAP and the Professional Development-Education Subcommittee are pleased to present a Lunchtime Chat on developing conference proposals. We hope you will join us for a lively and informative discussion about

  • approaches to refining research interests into a presentation at a specific venue (conference, symposia, webinar or other presentation format)
  • presentation formats and the work behind the scenes in the fit between presenter, topic, format, and theme
  • tips for less-experienced ARLISians interested in developing themselves as researchers, scholars, and contributors to the field

This chat is geared towards anyone curious about how to become more involved in presenting research. Bring your questions! We also welcome more experienced ARLISians to share their experiences and tips related to the topic.
For more information about Lunchtime Chats, visit: http://www.arlisna.org/chats/index.html

Authority, Connectivity, and Discovery: The Evolving Role of Reference in the Wiki Age
https://event.on24.com/eventRegistration/EventLobbyServlet?target=registration.jsp&eventid=462517&sessionid=1&key=67590F730BBF54C0DB5A508813F81A32&partnerref=ljweboxfordupwikiage06142012&sourcepage=register
SPONSORED BY: Oxford University Press and Library Journal
DATE AND TIME: Thursday, June 14, 2012, 2:00-3:00 PM EST/11:00 AM -12:00 PM PST
Why are traditionally-published reference resources still necessary?  What are publishers doing to make them accessible, usable, and discoverable in the library and on the free Web?  How are these changes impacting reference’s presence in the library?  How are user habits affecting how reference is published, developed, and utilized?  Register now to hear our esteemed panel, including Oxford University Press’ Robert Faber, Editorial Director for Reference (UK), Dave Tyckoson, reference librarian and Associate Dean at California State University, Fresno,  and Dinah Birch, Professor of English Literature and Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Research and Knowledge Exchange at the University of Liverpool and Editor of the newest edition of the classic Oxford Companion to English Literature, 7th Edition, on a panel moderated by Library Journal and School Library Journal Reference Editor Etta Thornton-Verma, as they tackle the topic of the ever-changing role of, and need for, authoritative reference in today’s libraries in the “Wiki age.”
Can’t make it June 14? No problem! Register now and you will get an email reminder from Library Journal post-live event when the webcast is archived and available for on-demand viewing at your convenience!
For more information about this webcast, please visit Library Journal.

Research Writer’s Consultations at the ALA Annual meeting
The ACRL Research Program Committee (RPC) is once again sponsoring Research Writer’s Consultations at the ALA Annual meeting, held June 22, 2012 – June 26, 2012 in Anaheim, California.  Aimed at the new or inexperienced writer, the Research Writer’s Consultations will pair new or inexperienced writers with an experienced writer or editor, who will offer guidance and critique.
AUTHORS:
Are you an ACRL member working on a research article? Would you like some constructive feedback? Submit a draft research paper for consultation. RPC will match new writers with experienced writers and the pairs will meet face-to-face during the ALA Midwinter meeting. Draft research papers must be submitted by June 15, 2012. Papers will be shared only among the designated pairs. Submission details follow:
Include on first page: Author’s name and contact information in upper left and a paragraph describing what you would like others to comment on about your paper (e.g., grammar, writing style, clarity, presentation of the research methodology).
Page limit: 25 double-spaced pages, standard 1″ margins.
Preferred format: Microsoft Word. Number pages. Footers should include author’s full name and e-mail.
Draft research papers should be in complete enough form for others to read easily.
Submit by June 15, 2012 to: Cheryl Middleton: cherly[dot]middleton[at]oregonstate[dot]edu.
MEET DURING ALA 2012 Annual
The experienced writer/editor and the writer they have been paired with will correspond ahead of time to determine the best time to meet at the meeting.
Questions should be directed to Cheryl Middleton: cherly[dot]middleton[at]oregonstate[dot]edu

NEDCC PRESERVATION TRAINING NEWS:
The 2012 Training Calendar is now up through December.

NEDCC has expanded its program to include even more digital topics,
while continuing to offer accessible, affordable hands-on and online
training on the essentials of physical collections care.

Check out the NEW Workshops and Webinars:
http://www.nedcc.org/eblasts/2012TrainingCalendar2.html
QUESTIONS?
Contact Donia Conn, dconn@nedcc.org
Northeast Document Conservation Center (NEDCC)
Andover, MA
Deadline is approaching…
DIGITAL DIRECTIONS
New Foundations: Creation, Curation, Use
June 13-15, 2012
Join Us in Boston!
www.nedcc.org

ALA Virtual Conference
Framing the ALA Virtual Conference on July 18 and 19, 2012, “Mapping Transformation” hosts keynote speakers and interactive 45-minute Web sessions providing insights from experts and offering opportunities for conversation around key issues related to transformation in libraries. Ideal both for those who can’t attend 2012 ALA Annual Conference and for those who are ready for more, right at their desktop!
Speakers include: George Needham and Joan Frye Williams on Libraries in a Post-Print World; Lee Rainie (Director of the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project), on the rise of e-books and next steps in the Project’s research on the evolving role of libraries; Brian Mathews, Jamie LaRue, Emily Dowdall (Senior Associate- Pew Charitable Trusts’ Philadelphia Research Initiative), Nate Hill, and others on transformative thinking and activity in libraries, and more.
And back by popular demand–30-minute author lunches hosted by Booklist editors Brad Hooper (talking with Katherine Boo) and Donna Seaman.
Special 25% discount for 2012 ALA Annual Conference full registrants on Virtual Conference registration–recommended for making the most of the interactivity and conversations, one of the best bargains in continuing education in the library world today.
The archive of ALA Virtual Conference will be available free to registrants for up to six months, and also free after the event to all full registrants of ALA Annual Conference.
Individual registration is $69 ($51.75 with Annual Conference discount), and group registration for up to 15 IP addresses is an affordable $300 ($225 with Annual Conference discount).


Looking for a few good librarians

Are you looking for a way to help out ArLISNAP?
I got good feedback from the ArLiSNAP meeting in Toronto about creating the following positions within ArLiSNAP:

  • chapter liaison → volunteer would routinely collect information about different events, developments, and discussions going on in ARLIS/NA regional chapters throughout the US, Canada, and Mexico and disseminate that information to ArLiSNAP members via the blog and other social media outlets
  • student group liaison → volunteer would create and maintain a list of active ARLIS/NA-affiliated (or aligned) student and young professionals throughout the ARLIS/NA zones. list would be part of a retooled reference section on the ArLiSNAP website, which would include refreshed links
  • education liaison → volunteer would focus on highlighting various educational opportunities (workshops, webinars, symposium, conferences) that could appeal to the ArLiSNAP membership and sharing that via the blog and our other social media outlets (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn)
  • member-at-large → would report on current events that would be pertinent to the ArLiSNAP membership including developments in policy within ARLIS/NA, legislation, new services, etc.

If you are interested in any of these positions, please email Stephanie or myself or comment below.
Stephanie and I would definitely be there to support/assist/collaborate with our liasons.


Mentee/Mentoring opportunity with ArLiS/NA!

The ARLIS/NA Mentoring Subcommittee seeks applications for the new Virtual Mentoring program. You can apply to be a mentor, mentee, or both using our online form.

http://tinyurl.com/bruvs2p

Both the mentor and mentee benefit from a successful relationship.

• Mentors provide mentees support, insight, and expertise.

• Mentees offer mentors information about emerging professional trends and technologies, a renewed enthusiasm for issues in art
librarianship, and new perspectives.

We believe that mentoring is not only valuable for the mentor and mentee, but for ARLIS as a whole.
A healthy organization supports mentoring to ensure that individuals coming up in the profession are well-positioned to carry out the goals
of the organization.

See below for additional information or visit: https://docs.google.com/document/pub?id=1Xuxf7c-mxCxWQhTl3ynetmk6HHrDEzni-BRhx4KTQcU

Apply today: http://tinyurl.com/bruvs2p Read the rest of this entry »


2012 ACRL Image Resources Interest Group Midwinter Virtual Meeting

2012 ACRL Image Resources Interest Group Midwinter Virtual Meeting:

“Current Trends in Public Domain Image Policies”

How accessible are  your “public domain” digital collections? Please join the ACRL Image Resources Interest Group (IRIG) for a conversation about the range of usage policies for public domain digital image collections. To what extent do new open access decisions reflect a shift in the way academic libraries and archives treat access to digital reproductions of public domain materials in our stewardship? Speakers from Cornell and Yale will talk about the recent open access policies at their institutions, and there will be a discussion and Q&A opportunity. Following the program, there will be IRIG updates and announcements.

About the speakers:

Peter Hirtle is a Senior Policy Advisor at Cornell University Library. Read his bio.

Melissa Gold Fournier is Associate Museum Registrar and Manager of Imaging Services at the Yale Center for British Art, where she oversees the operation and production of the digital imaging studio as well as rights-related collection information.  Melissa works closely with Yale’s Department of Digital Assets and Infrastructure on shared projects and serves as the lead for the Center’s participation in Yale’s shared digital asset management system.  She also works closely with the Center’s Department of Collections Information and Access both administratively and technically in providing access to the Center’s collections online.  Melissa has held successive positions of responsibility in museum registration and collections imaging at the YCBA since 1998, and is a graduate of Yale College.

Date: Tuesday February 14th, 2:00-3:30 pm Eastern time

Agenda:

  1. Introductions
  2. Presentations and discussion
    1. Peter Hirtle, Senior Policy Advisor, Cornell University Library
    2. Melissa Fournier, Associate Registrar and Manager of Imaging Services, Yale Center for British Art
  3. IRIG business meeting
    1. Visual Literacy Competency Standards update
    2. Programming updates
    3. Announcements

Advance registration is not required to participate. Click join the meeting at the appointed time.


Call for Papers: Artists’ Records in the Archives symposium

Artists’ Records in the Archives: A One Day Symposium – Call for Participation

The archives of many institutions contain artists’ records—documents created by artists that often bear witness to the creative process, as evinced by sketches, doodles, and other notations. Artists’ records differ from other types of records due to their inherent connection to the art object and the art market. In recent years there has been a plethora of symposia and conferences dedicated to artist archives, art history and “the archive,” as well as to the use of archival materials by contemporary artists.  While crucial, these investigations have been driven almost entirely by art historians and have not included the perspectives of archivists and special collections librarians.  As part of an effort to broaden the discussion surrounding artists’ records, the Archivists Round Table of Metropolitan New York has organized a one day symposium, “Artists’ Records in the Archives,” to be held on October 11, 2011 in conjunction with the New York Public Library.  Focusing on the perspective of the information professional, this symposium will address how contemporary artists use artists’ records in their work, the significance of artists’ records in archives for scholars and curators, and how archivists and special collections librarians manage artists’ records in their repositories.

Possible topics or areas of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

*Artists’ use of other artists’ records
*How archivists manage artists’ records and how this might differ within a museum, estate, gallery, and university setting
*Collecting artists’ records
*Appraisal of artists’ records
*Underdocumented artists and the archives
*Exhibitions and artists’ records
*Artists’ records and the digital environment
*Born digital artists’ records
*Copyright, moral rights, and the artist
*Conversations between archivists, artists, and art historians regarding archives

Date:  October 11, 2011
Location: New York Public Library

All individual presentations will be 20 minutes long (10 page paper).

Submissions must include a title, name of author and institutional affiliation, abstract (250 words max), and indication of technological requirements.

Individual papers or entire panel proposals accepted.

A small travel stipend is available. If interested please indicate in the submission.

Deadline for Proposals: Proposals should be emailed to artistsymposium@gmail.com by August 15, 2011. 


SAA Museum Archives Pecha Kucha Opportunity for SAA 2011

Museum Archives Section Meeting Repository Updates
Pecha Kucha Style Call for Proposals SAA 2011
Thursday, August 25, 3:30 pm – 5:30 pm
Deadline for submissions: July 29, 2011

Are you a member of the Museum Archives section of SAA? Do you have a repository update or an interesting new collection to share?

If so, please submit a brief proposal for a Pecha Kucha style presentation during the annual meeting of the Museum Archives section at the 2011 SAA conference. We look forward to accepting proposals that relate to museum archives, highlight new collections, or include repository news or highlights. To submit a proposal, please send a brief abstract of your topic, your name, institutional affiliation, and contact information, to Leanda Gahegan at leanda.gahegan@gmail.com. The deadline for proposals is July 29,2011.

Presenters must be a member of the Museum Archives section. If you are not a member yet, please feel free to join. More information is available here:

http://www.archivists.org/saagroups/museum/index.htm

The Museum Archives Section of the Society of American Archivists includes those who are responsible for the organization and care of archival collections located in museums.

About the Pecha Kucha format: Pecha Kucha sessions consist of multiple presenters, each having approximately 6 minutes and 40 seconds to present 20 PowerPoint slides on their topic. Timing will be strictly followed.


CAVRACON at UCSB June 16-17th, 2011

THE NORTHERN AND SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA CHAPTERS OF THE VISUAL RESOURCES ASSOCIATION cordially invite you to the California Visual Resources Association Conference, also known as CAVRACON, which will be held Thursday, June 16th and Friday, June 17th, 2011 at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Website: https://sites.google.com/site/cavraconference/

CaVraCon will provide workshops, presentations and demos dealing with the many aspects of creating, managing and maintaining digital image collections, as well as the opportunity to network with both emerging professionals and veterans of the field.

The conference will be open to any interested parties regardless of organizational or institutional affiliation.  Check the above site for registration information.

HIGHLIGHTS INCLUDE: 

Patricia Harpring (Managing Editor Getty Vocabulary Program)
Developing local authority files for the CCO/CDWA categories and a discussion of CONA

Megan Marler (ArtSTOR, Senior Analyst for Strategic Initiatives)
ArtSTOR?s Shared Shelf

George Helfand (Luna Imaging, Inc., Account Manager)
Expanding Your Scope: A Workflow for Adding Books to a Digital Image Collection

Greg Reser (UCSD, Metadata Specialist) and Sheryl Frisch (CalPoly, San Luis Obispo, Visual Resource Specialist)
The VRA Custom XMP Info Panel: How do I use it?

Jan Eklund (UC Berkeley, Business Systems Analyst, IST Data Services) and Chris Hoffman (UC Berkeley, Manager of Informatics Services, IST Data Services)
Deploying CollectionSpace for a VR Collection

Tom Moon (UCSB Library, Digitization Unit Manager)
Structuring Workflows: implementing new procedures without disruption

Lois McLean and Rick Tessman (McLean Media, Content Clips)
Content Clips, An Online Tool for Teaching with Digital Images

Dr. James Bartholomay Kiracofe (Director, Inter-American Institute for Advanced Studies in Cultural History)
Images for Education, On the road with an academic photographer

As well as a Plenary by the Visual Resources Association President, Maureen Burns (IMAGinED Consulting), Case Studies, tours and more!

Things to bring: flip-flops, laptops and business cards.
Please send questions to John Trendler <john.trendler@scrippscollege.edu>
We look forward to seeing you!


Deadline Extended: Be a part of the ArLiSNAP Focus Group!

ArLiSNAPPERS: We need your voice!

The Strategic Planning Committee is specifically targeting ArLiSNAP to provide feedback that will impact the future of the society! Please consider taking part in a one hour ArLiSNAP Focus Group conference call the week of April 18-22.

To sign up, please complete this Doodle indicating your availability:

http://www.doodle.com/aduiyn64tch7z8pd

From your ARLISNAP colleagues and Strategic Planning Committee members,

Jamie Lausch
Jennifer Garland

++++++++++

A note from the ArLiSNAP coordinators:

Everyone, please take this opportunity to become a part of this focus group. This type of engagement is exactly the kind of thing students and young professionals need to become an important part of the community. The Strategic Planning Committee is working hard to give our group a forum for discussions and suggestions that can help shape the future of ARLIS for the better.

Help make sure that ARLIS/NA is representing us.


NYC Metro Professional Development Classes for April/May

Every month, METRO offers an exciting range of learning and networking opportunities – details and registration are just a click away!

To receive significant discounts on METRO Professional Development classes and other career boosting benefits, all current library school students are invited to apply for myMETRO individual membership at the student rate of $50 per year.  To learn more or to apply, please visit http://www.metro.org/individual-membership/

April:
Personal Digital Archiving
Wed, April 13  |  1-4pm  |  $35 METRO & myMETRO, $60 Non-members
During this hands-on session, instructor Ellyssa Kroski will explain the process of creating and executing an action plan for archiving personal digital assets, deciding what to store, consolidating multiple file versions, and cataloging resources.
Learn more & register at http://www.metro.org/en/cev/29 <http://www.metro.org/en/cev/29> .

Information Architecture and Interaction Design (IA/IxD)
Fri, April 15  |  10am-4pm  |  $50 METRO, $40 myMETRO, $70 Non-members
Using a case study methodology, this workshop will introduce participants to the field of IA/IxD.  We will begin by reviewing the perceptual model necessary for thinking and working with IA/IxD and then apply this model to the process of IA/IxD by reviewing a case study from start to finish.
Learn more & register at http://www.metro.org/en/cev/51 <http://www.metro.org/en/cev/51> .

Webinar: Introduction to Major Changes from AACR2 to RDA
Wed, April 27  |  10-11:30am  |  $20 METRO & myMETRO, $40 Non-members
This webinar will provide an entry-level introduction to aspects of RDA records that differ from AACR2, and what catalogers should expect to see in RDA records generally.
Learn more & register at http://www.metro.org/en/cev/57 <http://www.metro.org/en/cev/57> .

METRO Book Talk: Boomers and Beyond – Reconsidering the Role of the Library
Thurs, April 28  |  6-8pm  |  $10 METRO, myMETRO, & Non-members
Diantha Schull and Pauline Rothstein will present an overview from their recent book “Boomers and Beyond: Reconsidering the Role of Libraries”, focusing on foundation theories about longevity, including its implications for health promotion, learning, work, and spirituality.
Learn more & register at http://www.metro.org/en/cev/52 <http://www.metro.org/en/cev/52> .

Webinar: Managing the Implementation of RDA at Your Library – What Administrators Need to Know
Fri, April 29  |  10-11:30am  |  $20 METRO & myMETRO, $40 Non-members
Instructor Chris Cronin will inform library administrators and cataloging managers on how to begin thinking about preparing staff and systems for the transition from AACR2 to RDA.
Learn more & register at http://www.metro.org/en/cev/56 <http://www.metro.org/en/cev/56> .

May:
Introduction to Metadata for Digital Collections
Tues & Wed, May 3 & 4  |  10am-4pm  |  $275 METRO, $225 myMETRO, $325 Non-members
Instructor Dr. Marcia Zeng will examine the role of metadata in the digital environment during this two-day workshop.  The main focuses will be given to 1) the applications of metadata standards for distinct domains and information communities and 2) the creation of application profiles according to local needs.
Learn more & register at http://www.metro.org/en/cev/45 <http://www.metro.org/en/cev/45> .

Enriching Metadata Services through Linked Data
Thurs, May 5  |  10am-1pm  |  $20 METRO & myMETRO, $30 Non-members
This workshop will explain the principles, concepts, and the potential usage of Linked Data in libraries of all sizes.  It will not cover technical implementation topics.
Learn more & register at http://www.metro.org/en/cev/46 <http://www.metro.org/en/cev/46> .

VRA Core: An Introduction to Metadata for Cultural Materials
Mon, May 9  |  1-4pm  |  $40 METRO, $30 myMETRO, $60 Non-members
Instructor Elisa Lanzi will cover the overall benefits of using the VRA Core in order to ensure streamlined inputting of crucial information about works and images, and to improve searching and user understanding.
Learn more & register at http://www.metro.org/en/cev/61 <http://www.metro.org/en/cev/61> .

Digital Rights Management for Library and Archives Projects
Wed, May 11  |  10am-4pm  |  $75 METRO, $60 myMETRO, $100 Non-members
This workshop will approach copyright from the collections and project management perspective.  Topics will include an overview of Section 108 and how to analyze underlying or third-party rights in textual, visual, audio, and moving image content.
Learn more & register at http://www.metro.org/en/cev/47 <http://www.metro.org/en/cev/47> .

Webinar: The Future for Libraries
Tues, May 17  |  10-11am  |  $20 METRO & myMETRO, $40 Non-members
Sarah Houghton-Jan, author of the popular blog, “Librarian in Black” will discuss how the current budget crisis will change the way we provide services to our patrons.  This webinar will be of particular interest for anyone interested in finding out what digital services libraries can build upon to better serve their communities now and in the future.
Learn more & register at http://www.metro.org/en/cev/70 <http://www.metro.org/en/cev/70> .

myMETRO Presents: An Evening of Presentation by myMETRO Student Members
Wed, May 18  |  6-8pm  |  There is no fee to attend, but registration is required.
Join us for a sample of cutting edge research in librarianship from three students, including an investigation of the impact of recommender systems; risk management applied to digital asset preservation; and a collaborative project to connect to LIS students.
Learn more & register at http://www.metro.org/en/cev/64 <http://www.metro.org/en/cev/64> .

Using XML in Libraries
Thurs, May 19 and Thurs, May 26  |  10am-4pm each day  |  $75 METRO, $60 myMETRO, $100 Non-members (covers both days)
This two-day intensive workshop is designed to teach beginners how to use XML in the library environment, with a focus on using the language for resource description, metadata management, and electronic text encoding.
Learn more & register at <http://www.metro.org/en/cev/47http://www.metro.org/en/cev/62 <http://www.metro.org/en/cev/62> .

Upcoming Special Interest Group Meetings:
ILL
Tues, April 12 | 10:00am-12:00pm |  Learn more & register: http://www.metro.org/en/cev/49 <http://www.metro.org/en/cev/49>

Science, Technology and Medical Librarians: Current Trends in Electronic Scholarly Communication
Thurs, April 14 | 1:30-4:30pm <http://www.metro.org/en/cev/44> | Learn more & register: http://www.metro.org/en/cev/44 <http://www.metro.org/en/cev/44>

Smart Phones and Mobile Computing: Mobile Information and Literacy Panel – Are You In the Know About Info to Go?
Fri, May 6 | 3:00-4:30pm |  Learn more & register: http://www.metro.org/en/cev/66 <http://www.metro.org/en/cev/66>

Digitization: Introducing the Newly Re-designed OCLC CONTENTdm
Mon, May 16 | 10am-12pm |  Learn more & register: http://www.metro.org/en/cev/67 <http://www.metro.org/en/cev/67>

Please contact Laura Forshay at lforshay@metro.org212.228.2320 x 10 with any questions.


CALL FOR PRESENTERS: ACRL ARTS SECTION’S DISCUSSION FORUM

Are you doing research in the arts that you would like to share with fellow librarians? Is there something you’re doing at your library dealing with the arts that you think others should know about? Do you have a presentation you’d like to float by a group of friendly colleagues for some benevolent critique?

If so, the ACRL Arts section invites you to submit a presentation proposal for our Discussion Forum held on Saturday, June 25th from 10:30-12noon during the ACRL Annual Conference in New Orleans, LA.

Details:

–Proposals can be about any topic dealing with the visual or performing arts and design (see list of possible topics below).
–Everyone is welcome to submit a proposal. Students are also encouraged to make a submission.
–Each presentation will have 15-20 minutes with a 5 minute Q&A. We anticipate being able to accept 4-5 proposals for presentation.
–Proposals will be reviewed by a committee drawn from the Arts Section Executive Board and Publications & Research Committee.

Deadline: Please submit your proposals to Yen Tran (nttran@callutheran.edu), chair of the Arts Section’s Publications & Research Committee no later than May 27th. Those submitting proposals will be notified by June 3rd, as to whether or not your proposal was accepted for presentation.

Possible topics:

–Research of any topic related to the arts
–Developments in the display and/or preservation of arts materials
 –Innovative information literacy or visual literacy techniques with arts students
–Emerging technologies in arts libraries
–Inventive collection management and development in the arts
–Strategies for reaching out to arts users (students and faculty)
–Copyright and fair use in the arts environment
–Evaluating the needs of arts users
–Use of images in information literacy instruction
–Creative physical or online/virtual exhibits

The possibilities are endless; please consider submitting a proposal.


NEA Newsletter Call for News!

Attention archivists, students, and repositories in the New England area:

The NEA newsletter is currently seeking articles about your activities and accomplishments for the July 2011 issue of the NEA newsletter. The newsletter relies entirely on entries from members, so please share your news with the archives community!

Past entries have included announcements about newly processed collections, new acquisitions, renovations and expansions, grants received, project updates, exhibit openings, student activities, photographs from collections, and internship opportunities. However, anything of interest to the archives community is welcome!

You can also add an item to our calendar of upcoming events (events, workshops, meetings, conferences, symposia, etc). Please limit your news item to around 150 words, or your calendar entry to around 25 words, and be sure to include your repository name, location, and a phone number or email address at the end of the piece.

The NEA will appreciate the time and thought you put into your writing!!

Send submissions by 05/16/2011 to:

Michael Dello Iacono
Records Manager
Suffolk University
Moakley Archive and Institute
120 Tremont Street
Boston, MA 02108
617.305.6255
www.suffolk.edu/archive