Job Posting: Outreach Librarian/ Research Services Coordinator, Fenimore Art Museum, Cooperstown, NY

Type:
Part Time

The New York State Historical Association, Fenimore Art Museum and The Farmers’ Museum seek an innovative, outgoing and highly motivated new member of the Research Library team. The librarian filling this new position will coordinate all of the ways in which users first interact with the Library and Museums in planning their visits for research purposes.

Acting as a “concierge” of sorts, the Outreach Librarian/Research Support Services Coordinator will connect users with all of the institutions’ resources in their many diverse formats. Our current users include museum staff and curators, members, scholars in the arts and humanities, genealogists, local history buffs, Graduate Students and Faculty in the Cooperstown Graduate Program for Museum Studies, American Folk and Fine art collectors and researchers, as well as independent curators, curators from other institutions, and donors to Special Collections.

The position is a permanent, part time and year round (20-25 hours per week with some seasonal fluctuations). This position has the potential to become full time at a future date. This is not a grant-dependent position.

Responsibilities include: 

* Interfacing with all library researchers, including some reference desk duties.

* Develop procedures and coordinate appointments for researchers, coordinating resources and on-site use by all Library Special Collection and Museum Collection users by liaising with the curators and librarians responsible for those collecting areas

* Coordinate database of library donors in conjunction with the Development Department

* Coordinate all incoming research requests working with the library team to ensure that responses are distributed in a timely manner

* Coordinate complete overhaul of the library’s website and social media activities with the Director for Museum and Library Collections and Director of Marketing; including integration of new OPAC into website “front door”

* Develop guides, materials, programs, and resources to enhance ease of access and positive user experience

* Participate in collection development, strategic planning, and cataloging workflows as needed

* Assist in development of new library audiences

* Participate in ongoing evaluation of policies and procedures

Required Qualifications include: 

* Masters of Library Science from an ALA accredited program

* Demonstrated experience in public service and specialty library programming

* Demonstrated experience in project management and coordination

* Demonstrated experience working with library special collections and/or museum collections

* Understanding of and experience in conducting archival research, and familiarity with a wide variety of primary resources (broadsides, maps, archives, oral histories, prints, photographs, museum objects, etc.)

* Experience as an effective part of a team

Desired qualifications: 

* Experience with OCLC Connexion & MARC format

* Familiarity with Islandora and Fedora Commons

* Experience with museum collection databases

To apply, submit a digital cover letter and resume to: j.zinger@nysha.org

Job link


Job Opportunity – Architecture Librarian – City College of New York

FACULTY VACANCY ANNOUNCEMENT

The City College Library invites nominations and applications for the position of Chief of the Architecture Library. The successful candidate will be service oriented and enthusiastic in working with library patrons.

The Librarian is responsible for directing the Architecture Library (the Library) located in the Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture. The Library is one of six CCNY libraries, and the successful candidate will join a campus-wide community of approximately 21 professional librarians, 20 administrative support staff, and 50+ student assistants. The Library has a growing collection of some 30,000 architecture monographs and bound journals, subscriptions to approximately 150 architecture-related journals in print and online, both domestic and foreign. The library additionally provides access to a large and growing collection of electronic books.

The Library serves the students, faculty, and visiting professors in undergraduate and graduate programs in Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Urban Design and Sustainable Urbanism. The Library serves as a significant information resource center.

Click here for more information and application instructions.


Job Opportunity – Department Assistant – Library and Archives – MoMA

Department Assistant | Library and Archives
Provides administrative support to the chiefs of MoMA Library and Archives. Works with supervisors on annual budget preparation, processes accounts payable and receivable, and monitors departmental spending. Plans and organizes meetings and events for both departments and constituent groups, including Trustee Committee on Archives, Library, and Research and the Library Council. Tracks dues payment for the Trustee Committee and the Library Council, as well as gifts and grants for specific projects for both departments. Works with Library Council editor on yearly artist’s book project. Tracks and records staff attendance on a weekly basis. Oversees maintenance of physical plant, and relations with outside service vendors. Serves as liaison to Information Technology department. Coordinates outgoing Library exchange program. Provides administrative support for archival research functions, including fact checking, drafting letters, logging, pulling materials, and scheduling appointments. Performs administrative support duties. Reports to Chief of Library and Chief of Archives.

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree, with a major or minimum of 16 credits in art history; knowledge of modern art preferred. Minimum of three years relevant administrative experience. Proficiency in Microsoft Word, Excel, Gmail, and other standard office procedures and equipment. Excellent organizational skills. Proficiency with tracking finance and budgets. Excellent verbal and written communication skills. Ability to take direction and work as part of a team. Experience with PeopleSoft preferred.

MoMA Jobs application guidelines

If you would like to submit your resume and cover letter for consideration, please choose one of the following options:

By e-mail: jobs@moma.org (most preferred option)
By fax: (212) 333-1107
By mail: The Museum of Modern Art
The Department of Human Resources
11 West 53 Street
New York, NY 10019

Please be advised that due to the high volume of applicants, we are only able to contact those candidates whose skills and background best fit the needs of the open positions. Thank you for your interest in employment opportunities at The Museum of Modern Art.


Interview with an Art Librarian: Kim Collins, Emory University

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Can you tell us a little bit about your background and your current position?

I went from pre-med to Art History in college because that is what I liked – life is short. My dad told me most people change careers seven times in their life, but I have stuck with Art History this whole time – though in three different capacities (as museum educator, art museum librarian, and now academic art librarian). My current position is as a subject librarian that serves the Art History and Classics department at Emory University.

What drew you to this position and art librarianship in general?

When getting my Masters degree in Art History at George Washington University, I got a paid internship at the National Gallery of Art’s modern prints and drawing dept. I loved classifying and researching artworks. I worked additional jobs in the photo archive and then in the 20th century department (now known as Modern & Contemporary). It wasn’t until I was working in the High Museum of Art education department during the Atlanta Olympic RINGS exhibit that a library position to presented itself. The High Museum of Art part-time librarian left and they began looking for her replacement. With a friend’s advice – don’t hide your lamp under a bushel – in my ear, I marched into the head curator’s office and said, “Give me the job; I’ll get the MLA.” And I got the degree and the job.

What are your main roles/duties at your current position?

The more typical roles are collection development and management (which is my favorite part of my job) instruction, and research consultation. The more recent developments in my duties include Digital Humanities, Scholarly Communications, data management (ex. Digital Images), special collections, and marketing.

What is a typical day like for you?

My favorite part of my job is collections development, purchasing materials for the library, and collections management, figuring out how to fit all of our materials in the stacks. It’s the beginning of the semester, so I am also creating web guides and trying to work with faculty to set-up library instruction for classes that need it. I have taken to making a weekly To Do list that includes all my Subject Librarian stuff balanced with Humanities Team leader stuff and Service to the Library (task force on events/exhibitions, Comm for LSC, Blog Oversight Group, O&E) and professional development (ARLIS/SE is planning NOLA 2017, getting ready for Ft. Worth). There is never northing to do in this field. I also spend a lot of time mentoring other subject librarians on my team, as well as graduate student fellows.

What were/are some challenges for you as a new art librarian? Are these related to larger challenges in art librarianship?

It used to bother me (when I was a one-man show at HMA) that we do much behind-the-scenes work, and yet patrons only appreciate the tip of the iceberg. But it’s great when patrons appreciate the library in any capacity, so I learned not to mind too much.

What do you think are the most important issues facing art librarians today?

Permissions/Copyright – our IP Librarians likes to say, “Copyright kills dreams.” Students who are writing theses or dissertations cannot use images without permissions, but the cost of permissions is prohibitive.

Data Management – digital image metadata, etc.

Digital Art History – how does it become just another tool art historians use? How to guide students in this endeavor? It will become more mainstream so we need to teach people the skills and how to utilize new tools in their research and teaching.

Marketing – tell your story, the age of assessment and data.

What are the most important things emerging art librarians should know?

Relationships are HUGE – across your library, across your campus, across your field. Art Librarianship is a pretty small world. It helps to know colleagues (as well as faculty and students) who you can ask questions of or collect data from.

 

Just for fun – what is your favorite library? Work of art or artist?

I like IM Pei’s National Gallery of Art library reference library, mainly because of fond memories of the people who worked there when I was a library user. I also have fond memories of the Smithsonian’s Archives of American Art Library when it used to be housed in the Old Patent Building. But, if I have to pick just ONE library – I’ll say the Library at Villa I Tatti, The Harvard Center for Italian Renaissance Studies, outside of Florence. Its founder, Bernard Berenson (1865–1959), described I Tatti as a library with a house attached, which I love.

As far as artists, I like conceptual artists who employ word-play and irreverence – Ed Ruscha, Bruce Nauman, and Jenny Holzer.


Job Posting – Library Assistant (P/T) – Brooklyn Museum

Library Assistant (P/T)—Libraries and Archives

(Part-time, temporary, non-union position)

Requirements: The ideal candidate must have experience working in a museum library setting; excellent and accurate communication and computer skills; the ability to perform detailed work such as creating, entering, and searching bibliographic data; and knowledge of library automated systems, such as OCLC and MARC formats. M.L.S. student preferred.

Responsibilities: The Library Assistant’s main responsibilities include ordering acquisitions and recording them into a shared Library Online Catalog; maintaining financial records and processing invoices; maintaining the stacks, including labeling, shelving, and shifting the collections; packaging and mailing interlibrary loans and other library projects; circulating materials to Museum staff; assisting both the Museum staff and the public onsite and via phone, letter, fax, and email; and photocopying, scanning, and other general office work.

Work schedule: 20 hours a week, Wednesday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., first Saturdays of the month from October to June, and possible late hours on Thursdays

To apply: Please send a résumé and cover letter via email to job.library.assistant@brooklynmuseum.org.

Job link here.


Our Virtual Conference Recordings Are Now Available!

webinar_400x250The recordings from our virtual conference are now available via the ARLIS/NA Learning Portal! These recordings are freely available to all.

Click here for all recordings!

Part One: Keynote Address and Student & New Professional Presentations

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Keynote Speaker, Elizabeth Lane

Student and New Professional Speakers: Kathryn Thornhill, Morgan McKeehan, Abigail Sadler, and Hannah Marshall

Student and New Professional Speakers: Kathryn Thornhill, Morgan McKeehan, Abigail Sadler, and Hannah Marshall

Part Two: New Initiatives in Art Archives

Panel Discussion featuring: Kristie MacDonald, founder of Archiving Art Imogen Smith, Project Manager at the Dance Heritage Coalition Caitlin Harrington and Seth Persons, students at Pratt Institute and NYARC Project members

Panel Discussion featuring:
Kristie MacDonald, founder of Archiving Art
Imogen Smith, Project Manager at the Dance Heritage Coalition
Caitlin Harrington and Seth Persons, students at Pratt Institute and NYARC Project members

Part Three: Student & New Professional Presentations

Nicole Lovenjak, Country Baron, Alexandra Kadlec, and Amber Welch

Nicole Lovenjak, Country Baron, Alexandra Kadlec, and Amber Welch

Part Four: Advice Roundtable

Suzanne Rackover, Managing Librarian, Paul D. Fleck Library & Archives, The Banff Centre Ashley Peterson, Librarian, School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston Molly Schoen, Information Resources/Technical Specialist, Visual Resources Collection, University of Michigan Amanda Meeks, Reference and Instruction Librarian, Savannah College of Art and Design ACA Library, Atlanta

Suzanne Rackover, Managing Librarian, Paul D. Fleck Library & Archives, The Banff Centre
Ashley Peterson, Librarian, School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
Molly Schoen, Information Resources/Technical Specialist, Visual Resources Collection, University of Michigan
Amanda Meeks, Reference and Instruction Librarian, Savannah College of Art and Design ACA Library, Atlanta


Conversation with Erinn Paige and Laura Damon-Moore of The Library as Incubator Project (Part 1)

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Erinn Paige (left) and Laura Damon-Moore (right) are at the helm of The Library as Incubator Project. I recently talked with them about LAIP and their other endeavors.

What is Library As Incubator Project and what motivated you to embark on this adventure?

Laura: At this point, the Library as Incubator Project is a multifaceted information sharing machine. We continue to exist online, through our primary website and in social media neighborhoods. We’ve been lucky enough to publish a book based on and extending the work we do online. We also exist in “real life” through public presentations, professional development workshops, and in-person programs that we do for libraries and other cultural institutions.

At the most basic level, the LAIP began as a way to explore the connection between libraries and creative people. Erinn and I came to Library and Information services with backgrounds in the humanities and creative arts. So the LAIP started as a way to explore the connection of creativity, information, and community, to see how it happens formally and informally in the library setting, and then, because we were hearing so many great stories, we knew we had to share them with a wider audience.

What were/are some challenges and rewards in running Library As Incubator Project?

Erinn: It is a constant challenge to juggle a full time job and the LAIP, which could easily be a full time job in and of itself.  We’re both also artists in our own right (hence our interest in the library-arts connection), and supporting a creative life while sharing stories of other people’s creative lives can be a challenge too!

But the place that the whole project sprang from is an elegant support– it’s that egalitarian, helpful library space, AND it’s that hands-on creative space that you find in a studio environment.  We’re very project oriented, and so Laura and I and our team will take on individual LAIP projects that interest us, and when we hit obstacles, we have a whole team who can offer critique, just like you get in a studio:  what’s working, what isn’t, techniques that could help, skills and resources to apply. By the same token, we also really support one another in our creative pursuits.

Laura: I wish we had more time and more resources to do more, more, more! It was definitely a challenge to settle into a routine as we all graduated and juggled job stuff plus the LAIP. For a while it felt like there were a lot of balls up in the air and we were sort of scrambling to sort out who would catch which one as they fell.

Rewards have got to be the community that has developed around the LAIP. This ranges from our teammates, Katie and Holly, to our awesome site post contributors (cough cough, Rebecca, cough) to the people that we connect with on social media and in person at programs and conferences. When we go visit institutions and talk with people, people are generally excited to talk with us, but WE get so much MORE excited hearing about the amazing programs and partnerships people have going on. It’s the best and absolutely why I keep working on this.

What are your “day jobs” and how do they integrate with managing Library As Incubator Project?

Erinn: I’m the Programing Librarian at New Canaan Library in New Canaan Connecticut, which is a relatively new position for me– I just started in 2014.

Although the actual work of running the Library as Incubator Project ( web building, editing, writing, social media, presentations and conferences, etc etc) all happens on my own time, the philosophical underpinnings that guide our work on the LAIP transfer directly to programming librarianship– namely, that information isn’t always something that you can collect and slap a barcode on in order to provide access.  There’s a very real body of “creative information” (for lack of a better term) that can only be accessed in real-world connections: conversations with experts, hands-on learning opportunities, etc. Learning by doing.  Apprenticeship.

Working on the Library as Incubator Project has proven, again and again, that Libraries are central to not just an information exchange (resource –> person), but an information life cycle— people learn, people use what they learn to make something new; that new thing sparks conversation and more learning and more making and more sharing.  Through the Incubator, I’ve seen proof that we can be the alpha and omega of that life cycle, and I bring that ideal to work every day.  That’s what I want my library to be.

Laura: I am the Assistant Director at a small public library in Evansville, Wisconsin, just outside of Madison. My position focuses on Programming and Outreach, mainly with families and youth. I do everything from facilitating early literacy programs to running after school activities to planning and hosting special community programs on weekends, inside and outside of the library.

From a practical standpoint, I am able to integrate LAIP work into my routine pretty easily – I am 80% in my position at the library, so I have one weekday off where I can focus on other things, and luckily, at this point, the LAIP has become a natural part of my weekly rhythm and routine.

Like Erinn, the LAIP has done a lot in terms of directing the way that I approach my job philosophically. It’s about making a space where people feel welcome to explore, learn something new, experiment, fail, try it again, share their work, help others. From another practical standpoint, the LAIP means that we hear about a lot of awesome new initiatives and program ideas. It’s like a smorgasboard of creative arts programming that I get to pick and choose from, depending on what will work best for my community.

Be sure to catch part two of our conversation here tomorrow!


A Success Story: An Interview with Lindsey Reynolds

Lindsey Reynolds is the new(ish) Art Librarian at the Birmingham Museum of Art, in Birmingham, Alabama (http://www.artsbma.org). She’s graciously agreed to answer some questions for us here at ArLiSNAP.

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Can you tell us a little bit about your background and your current position?

I got my MLIS degree from the University of Alabama in December 2011. I was fortunate to receive the ARLIS/NA internship award that year, so I went to New York in the Spring of 2012 to intern with the New York Art Resources Consortium (MoMA, the Frick, and the Brooklyn Museum libraries). After that, I took an archiving job at an architecture firm in Atlanta. In mid-2013 I went back to New York to work at the Whitney as the Library Assistant. And last September I started as the Librarian at the Birmingham Museum of Art.

What drew you to this position and art librarianship in general?

I had frequented the BMA as a student and really respected their permanent collection. I enjoy being at a smaller institution – I’ve gotten to know all of my colleagues and get to work on more museum-wide projects. The museum has recently challenged itself to grow from a regional clearing house for travelling exhibitions to a nationally-recognized and locally relevant museum, producing our own exhibitions and providing a socially-engaged, creative platform for our community. I’m excited to be a part of that change.

What are your main roles/duties at your current position?

I have a few interns and volunteers, but I’m the only librarian at the museum which means I am responsible for both the library collection and the institutional archives. So far I’ve been getting familiar with the collection and doing some housekeeping. I’m planning a stacks shift for the summer, and am working on a records retention policy for the museum which will hopefully help to grow our institutional archive. I’m most excited to start acquiring artist’s books.

What is a typical day like for you?

My days vary tremendously, that’s one of my favorite parts of the job. Since I’m the only one, I can really tailor my day to suit my moods – some days I do a little bit of everything (policy writing, outreach, reference, acquisitions), other days I dedicate to one task (cataloging or processing usually), and other days I have so many meetings that I hardly get to sit down at my desk!

What were/are some challenges for you as a new art librarian? Are these related to larger challenges in art librarianship?

At first my biggest challenge felt like finding a job. Now that I’ve tried a few, I think one of the biggest challenges for me, and for museum libraries in general, is staying relevant and visible to my colleagues and to the public. It can be hard to push for more funding since libraries don’t typically generate income – I see it as an opportunity for creativity and collaboration.

What are the most important things emerging art librarians should know?

There are so many opportunities out there! Look around and find a career path that suits you (see the “New Voices in the Profession” panel at the ARLIS/NA conference if you need ideas!)

When you’re applying for jobs pay attention to where the library falls in an institution’s hierarchy – it can tell you a lot about the institution’s priorities and their commitment to the library/archives department.

Just for fun – what is your favorite library? Work of art or artist?

Oh geez – those are unanswerable questions. I’m pretty enamored with Etel Adnan’s work lately. I had never seen her artist’s books until the Whitney Biennial last year, and I think they’re great. I also really enjoy the things that the Office of Culture and Design are doing in the Philippines, especially the Manila Review. They are using publications as a platform for community engagement and are a great example of what social practitioners can achieve and keeping a sense of humor throughout it all.


Job Opportunities

Fine Arts Librarian – Binghamton University – Binghamton, NY

Associate Chief Librarian for Reader Services, Thomas J. Watson Library, Metropolitan Museum of Art – NY, NY

Archivist – Hunt Slonem Studio – NY,NY

Archivist – Sperone Westwater – NY,NY


Job Opportunities

Library Assistant – New York Film Academy – Los Angeles, CA

Reader Services Librarian – Bard Graduate Center, New York City


Job postings

Access Services Librarian – California Institute of the Arts – Valencia, CA

Consulting/Training Archivist – Richard Diebenkorn Foundation – Berkeley, CA

Collections Manager for Museum and Special Collections – Seton Hall University – South Orange, NJ


Job Posting: Reference Librarian – SCAD, Savannah, GA

The Savannah School of Art and Design is seeking applicants for the position of Reference Librarian.

This position works with Reference Department staff and other library staff members to assist students, faculty and staff in their research and instruction needs. The Reference Librarian also assists in the promotion of library collections and services to the SCAD Community.
· ALA-accredited MLS or MLIS degree
· Ability to plan and provide library instruction that incorporates information literacy standards and current teaching practices
· Current knowledge in the library field to address general and subject-specific information resources and effective search strategies
· Up-to-date and knowledgeable about emerging technologies that support reference and instructional services
· Education or significant research experience in one or more subjects offered at SCAD
· Superior verbal, written and interpersonal communication skills
· Prior experience working collaboratively with faculty, students and staff in an academic library environment is preferred

Details and application instructions can be viewed at https://scadjobs.scad.edu/postings/9601.


Join Us for Visualizing the Future: New Perspectives in Art Librarianship!

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Our virtual conference is now open for registration! Check out our full line-up of spectacular speakers here.

This virtual conference will take place on Jan 17, 2015 at 12:00 PM CST.

Register now!

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4374379886671502081

ArLiSNAP and VREPS are proud to present our virtual conference, Visualizing the Future: New Perspectives in Art Librarianship. This event will serve as a venue for students and new professionals to present, share advice, and discuss the future of our evolving profession. For a full schedule and list of presentations, please visit arlisnap.org.

This event is free and open to all; attendees do not need to be members of ARLIS/NA or VRA. Registration will close two hours before the start of the webinar. For assistance, please contact webinars@arlisna.org. Additional information about webinars is available on the ARLIS/NA Learning Portal.

This webinar will be recorded, and the video will be made available on the ARLIS/NA Learning Portal within two weeks after the webinar.

By registering, I understand and acknowledge that this Webinar will be recorded by ARLIS/NA and/or those designated by ARLIS/NA. ARLIS/NA may record my name and questions I ask during the course of the Webinar presentation. As a condition of my participation in the Webinar, I agree to irrevocably grant to ARLIS/NA, its assigns, licensees and successors the right to publish, record, broadcast, exhibit, display, reproduce, edit or otherwise use perpetually throughout the world, in all media now and hereafter known or devised, in whole or in part, my name, questions, quotes and material otherwise provided by me (collectively, the “Material”) during my participation in the Webinar. I also agree that ARLIS/NA shall be the sole owner in perpetuity of any and all rights in and to any and all works containing the Material, in whole or in part, for all purposes whatsoever and in any manner or media including, without limitation, printed works, compact discs, DVDs, MP3, and computer on line services.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

View System Requirements


2015/16 Kress Fellowship in Art Librarianship at Yale University

Fixed Duration Position:  12 months from date of hire; non-renewable
Expected Start Date:        July 6, 2015

Yale University offers exciting opportunities for achievement and growth in New Haven, Connecticut.  Conveniently located between Boston and New York, New Haven is the creative capital of Connecticut with cultural resources that include two major art museums, a critically-acclaimed repertory theater, state-of-the-art concert hall, and world-renowned schools of Architecture, Art, Drama, and Music.

POSITION DESCRIPTION

The Yale University Library welcomes applications for the 2015/16 Kress Fellowship in Art Librarianship. The Kress Fellowship is intended for a recent graduate from library school who wishes to pursue a career in art librarianship. This fellowship is made possible through the generosity of the Samuel H. Kress Foundation.   Through this fellowship, the Kress Foundation seeks to achieve in the field of art librarianship what it has accomplished for art history and art conservation:  ensuring the growth of the discipline by promoting the advancement of new professionals.

The Haas Family Arts Library at Yale serves a distinguished array of academic and museum programs, architects, artists and scholars. Kress Fellows have the opportunity to interact with faculty, staff and students in distinguished Schools of Architecture, Art, and Drama; a nationally ranked department of the History of Art; and two outstanding university art museums, the Yale Center for British Art and the Yale University Art Gallery. They also have occasion to collaborate with colleagues from throughout the Yale University Library, including the Sterling Memorial Library, the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, and the library and rare books department of the Yale Center for British Art. The rich professional and scholarly resources of New York City and Boston’s art libraries and museums are within two hours travel, providing still further opportunities for professional growth and professional contact with colleagues.

RESPONSIBILITIES

The Kress Fellowship is a 12-month appointment and focuses on multiple areas of art librarianship including public services, collection development and management, special collections, and digital collections.  Projects and activities will draw on subject areas served by the Haas Arts Library including the history of art, architecture, drama, and aligned area studies. The fellow will gain experience in reference services and library research education in the Haas Family Arts Library, the Haas Arts Special Collections, and the Library and Archives of the Yale Center for British Art. Other activities will vary based on current Yale Library projects and the fellow’s interest and experience.

During their tenure at Yale, Kress Fellows are expected to pursue mutually agreed-upon projects resulting in a publishable paper, a new library service (such as a webpage or research guide), or other relevant deliverables. Kress Fellows are also introduced to a broad spectrum of professional activities and may have the opportunity to perform collection development activities or assist with library-based exhibitions.   Kress Fellows also participate in library planning committees and task forces and engage in campus, regional, and national professional organizations and other collaborative activities. Fellows are also expected to be professionally active and represent the Library and the University in the academic, scholarly, and professional community.

QUALIFICATIONS

Master’s degree from an ALA-accredited program for library and information science.  Excellent analytical, organizational, management, customer service, and interpersonal skills.  Ability to effectively build partnerships and promote the benefits of change in an academic culture that often values ambiguity, diversity of opinion, and historic precedent.  Ability to communicate effectively through both oral and written expression.  Ability to work both independently and collegially in a demanding and rapidly changing environment.

Preferred:  Advanced degree and/or relevant experience in history of art, architecture or related arts disciplines.  Experience with web design and development and electronic information resources.  Experience with HTML and XML.  Reading knowledge of two or more Western European languages.

Click here for more information.


Profile: Sheila Cork, Art Librarian at the New Orleans Museum of Art

Name: Sheila Cork
Job: Art Librarian at the New Orleans Museum of Art

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Walking into the New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA), one would hardly know that beneath the beautiful marble and tiled floor there is a Special Library, the Felix J. Dreyfous library to be exact. A set of inconspicuous doors lead the visitor down to the administrative offices and the library sits, waiting, on the other side of glass walls.

One woman, Sheila Cork, runs the show as the Art Librarian in a library that is home to over 20,000 titles (mostly monographs), 70 art-specific journal titles, and exhibition archives from 1911 – 2000.

“The biggest thing I found in my life… is to volunteer in something in your field. It will always lead to something,” she says when prompted for advice for young professionals.

Volunteering is how Cork found her way to libraries in the first place. Starting in 1985, Cork began to volunteer at her local library in England. She started with book mending and worked her way up to Circulation Services. When she and her husband moved to the United States, Cork realized that to continue advancing in the field, she would have to earn her MLIS degree.

While working in the Reference department at the Hancock County Library in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, Cork studied to earn her masters degree from the University of Southern Mississippi. During the course of her studies, Cork was made the Head of Information Services at the library. Although she liked the promotion, she realized that it was “very administrative and not very ‘hand-on’.”

Seeking a change, Cork applied for the position as an Art Librarian at a “Fine Art Institution” according to the job ad. That “Fine Art Institution” happened to be the New Orleans Museum of Art. Cork and her husband moved to New Orleans in June 2005, two months before Hurricane Katrina ripped through the city.

“We were lucky…we only had puddles to clean up,” Cork said, thinking back to her first days on the job.

Since becoming the Librarian at NOMA, Cork has put into place a volunteer system, with 8 to 9 people (usually undergraduate students) who work 2 to 4 hours a week. She has coordinated the NOMA Book Club, discussion groups, author events, field trips, and programming. Her current projects include digitizing scrapbooks/ephemera and digitizing Works Progress Act project files.

When asked for any closing words of wisdom, Cork replied, “Be flexible about what you do. Be able to work with different people. And never be afraid to clean the windows.”


Submit your proposal for the ArLiSNAP/VREPS Virtual Conference!

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ArLiSNAP and VREPS (Visual Resources Emerging Professionals and Students) are joining forces to host a virtual conference this winter! The conference is titled Visualizing the Future: New Perspectives in Art Librarianship, and will take place on the afternoon of Saturday, January 17th, 2015.  This is an excellent opportunity for those who cannot be physically present at our annual conferences.

 

We are looking for students and new professionals with an interest in art librarianship or visual resources management to present their work. Have you been working on a project using technology in a new way? Do you have thoughts to share on topics such as metadata and visual resources, copyright and the arts, or visual literacy? Would you like to share your work with the ARLIS and VRA communities? Submit your proposal, and add your voice to our discussion on the future of the field!

 

Other sessions in this event will include:

  • A roundtable of new professionals, who will share advice about starting out in your career. The speakers will answer questions about their work, as well as their thoughts on the best ways to gain experience and job hunt in this field.
  • A panel on initiatives in art archiving, where speakers working on documentation and preservation will discuss their work, and suggest ways for students to get involved.
  • A keynote speech from art librarian Elizabeth Lane, who will discuss her current work and her thoughts on the future of the profession.

 

Requirements:

  1. Presenters must be MLIS students or new professionals with fewer than five years of experience in the field.
  2. Presentations will be between ten and fifteen minutes in length.
  3. Ideally, presenters will be available for a live presentation and brief Q&A session on the afternoon of Saturday, January 17th, 2015. However, pre-recording the presentation prior to the event may also be possible.

 

Submit your proposal via this link by Saturday, November 15th.

 

If you have any questions about this event, please don’t hesitate to contact Ellen Tisdale, ArLiSNAP Co-Moderator, at ellen.j.tisdale [at] gmail [dot] com.


Job Posting: Architecture Library Specialist, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ

The Architecture Library Specialist is responsible for the Architecture Library in the absence
of the Director. The position works a closing shift schedule (currently 12:30 pm to 8:30 pm
during fall and spring semesters). The schedule may include any hours of days of the week
that the Architecture Library is open and may be changed as needed. For more information
see http://library.njit.edu/jobs.

Link out to posting (.pdf)


What’s up on your campus?

Does your MLIS program host a student interest group related to art librarianship? Or, perhaps your Special Libraries Association student chapter attracts the art library-curious? If so, ArLiSNAP wants to know! Leave a comment or get in touch with Ashley Peterson, ArLiSNAP Student Liaison at aepeterson [at] gmail [dot] com.

We are interested in keeping in touch with art library student interest groups across North America so that we can share information with you and help you promote activities, projects, or events you’d like to share with the wider art library community. You can keep up with us via:

And, if you would like to get more involved with our group, we are always happy to recruit new volunteers to keep our activities running smoothly – have a look at the ways you can help out as an ArLiSNAP Liaison here.

Interested in seeing what other student groups are up to? Check out Western University’s Facebook group, or the Society of Art Librarianship Students at Indiana University’s Facebook group!


Job Postings: Emily Carr University of Art + Design (Vancouver) needs a Circulation Assistant and a Library Assistant

http://www.ecuad.ca/about/careers/jobs/313762

http://www.ecuad.ca/about/careers/jobs/313761

Both positions require a Library Technician diploma; further details can be found at each link. The deadline for both positions is July 4th (that’s tomorrow!) — I apologize for not posting these more in advance, but I’ve just gotten back from a trip across the country. Also, summer heat wave. Very convenient excuse.

 


Interview: Life as The Banff Centre’s Library Work-Study

For those of you thinking about spending six months in gorgeous Banff, Alberta (yes, international applicants are encouraged!):
Here are some words of wisdom from last year’s Library Work-Study, Jaye Fishel, who spent her tenure working to promote and display the Banff Centre’s insane collection of artists’ books. Jaye kindly answered my questions about being an American book-nerd in Alberta, the projects she worked on, and the application procedures to get into one of Canada’s prettiest cultural institutions.

The Banff Centre Library

The Banff Centre Library

ArLiSNAP: Can you start with a bit of your background?

Jaye Fishel: I was an artist before I got my MLIS degree, which I in-part pursued to professionalize my interest in artists’ books in particular. I worked in the rare books library during my undergraduate studies (at Emory University) and was introduced to artists’ books in processing collections. That led me to move to San Francisco in 2005 to study at the Center for the Book there, where I learned letterpress printing and other techniques. Since then, I’ve expanded my artistic repertoire but books and works on paper still figure largely into what I’m interested in engaging with, both professionally and as an artist.

ArLiSNAP: What were you doing previous to taking the work-study position?

JF: I was living in Oakland, unable to find a professional position suitable for me. I only realized after graduating with my MLIS that any job, let alone a job dealing with artists’ books, was very difficult to come by.

ArLiSNAP: What was the application process like?

JF: The application process was straightforward — I submitted a project proposal in addition to a standard cover letter that outlined a project I would produce while at the Centre. Since the work-study position is an educational program, like an internship, I stated some learning objectives. Applying to work in Canada from the US seemed to have little bearing on the application process, although once I accepted the position, I had to secure a student visa, which did not show up until the day before my flight to Banff, causing more than a little anxiety.

ArLiSNAP: A student visa?

JF: I needed a student visa because the work-study program is considered an educational program, so technically I was a student in the eyes of the Canadian government. Work-study participants receive a stipend, not a salary, and are generally treated differently than staff at the Centre.

ArLiSNAP: What attracted you to the position?

JF: The job description was like a dream! Working fairly exclusively with the artists’-books collection in an international art residency centre? I was attracted to everything about that. Plus, I needed a change in my life, so I felt ready to move to remote Banff from the Bay Area, which was changing rapidly before my eyes into a place that felt less and less accommodating to artists and craftspeople. I was also attracted to the adventure.

ArLiSNAP: What period of time were you there? What was it like moving to Banff and settling in?

JF: I arrived in Mid-May and I left at the end of February, so I was there for nine months. It was an adventure the entire time — living in the middle of the Canadian Rockies in an art residency center was unlike my life in the Bay. I hadn’t lived through a snowy winter since I was a child, so that was definitely an adjustment, as was living in a very small tourist town. I had a sometimes quiet, simple existence — sometimes filled with lots of art and parties and people from all over the world.

ArLiSNAP: What was a typical work day like?

JF: I worked four days a week, nine to five, with one day away from the library to work on outside research or projects. Typical days usually included working on artists’-book catalog records, planning upcoming events, and working with patrons. Then I’d walk home and see at least one deer or elk, on average.

ArLiSNAP: You started a few neat initiatives while you were there. Can you tell us about getting those programs going?

JF: I had a lot of freedom to create new initiatives and work on a variety of projects. The bulk of what I did at times was cataloging, or improving the very basic cataloging of the artists’ books collection, which is extensive at over 4,300 items. I would pull items from a particular press or artist at once to make comprehensive improvements to parts of the collection that relate to one another. I also initiated a public program series of artists’ books showcases, where I would pull random items from the collection and invite the resident artists and the public to engage with the items. I also started a several-year-long project to display every item in the artists’ books collection in a case in the library, as well as online via documentary images. (http://banffcentrelibraryandarchives.tumblr.com/)

I had wonderful support from my mentor, Suzanne Rackover, to do whatever I wanted with my time to enhance use of the collections. So I just came to her with my ideas and she supported my process. For the artists’ books showcases, I would loosely try to pull items that would be of interest to visual artists on residencies. I would make sort of weird promotional fliers and hand them out and post around campus. Setting up the Tumblr project required simply creating a randomized spreadsheet of the collection, creating the new display every Monday of fifteen items, photographing the works, and posting to the Tumblr. It’s a fairly simple process, so now almost anyone who works in the library can continue the weekly changes.

Artists'-Book Showcases

Artists’-Book Showcases

ArLiSNAP: Do you have any advice for someone looking to apply to the Banff Centre Library, or things to do while working there?

JF: I’d advise anyone interested in working with an outstanding artists’ books collection to apply. It is truly an amazing collection that I feel so lucky to have worked with every day. I know I’m a great deal more knowledgeable about artists’ books than I was before working at the Centre. Working at The Banff Centre is very special because artists across media from around the world come to make and show work. I encourage any future library work study to go to every show, performance, artist talk, party, dinner, bingo night, hike, and outing possible. There is a lot to experience in a very short time.

Applications for the Library Work-Study are due on June 15th!