Job Posting: Outreach Librarian/ Research Services Coordinator, Fenimore Art Museum, Cooperstown, NY

Type:
Part Time

The New York State Historical Association, Fenimore Art Museum and The Farmers’ Museum seek an innovative, outgoing and highly motivated new member of the Research Library team. The librarian filling this new position will coordinate all of the ways in which users first interact with the Library and Museums in planning their visits for research purposes.

Acting as a “concierge” of sorts, the Outreach Librarian/Research Support Services Coordinator will connect users with all of the institutions’ resources in their many diverse formats. Our current users include museum staff and curators, members, scholars in the arts and humanities, genealogists, local history buffs, Graduate Students and Faculty in the Cooperstown Graduate Program for Museum Studies, American Folk and Fine art collectors and researchers, as well as independent curators, curators from other institutions, and donors to Special Collections.

The position is a permanent, part time and year round (20-25 hours per week with some seasonal fluctuations). This position has the potential to become full time at a future date. This is not a grant-dependent position.

Responsibilities include: 

* Interfacing with all library researchers, including some reference desk duties.

* Develop procedures and coordinate appointments for researchers, coordinating resources and on-site use by all Library Special Collection and Museum Collection users by liaising with the curators and librarians responsible for those collecting areas

* Coordinate database of library donors in conjunction with the Development Department

* Coordinate all incoming research requests working with the library team to ensure that responses are distributed in a timely manner

* Coordinate complete overhaul of the library’s website and social media activities with the Director for Museum and Library Collections and Director of Marketing; including integration of new OPAC into website “front door”

* Develop guides, materials, programs, and resources to enhance ease of access and positive user experience

* Participate in collection development, strategic planning, and cataloging workflows as needed

* Assist in development of new library audiences

* Participate in ongoing evaluation of policies and procedures

Required Qualifications include: 

* Masters of Library Science from an ALA accredited program

* Demonstrated experience in public service and specialty library programming

* Demonstrated experience in project management and coordination

* Demonstrated experience working with library special collections and/or museum collections

* Understanding of and experience in conducting archival research, and familiarity with a wide variety of primary resources (broadsides, maps, archives, oral histories, prints, photographs, museum objects, etc.)

* Experience as an effective part of a team

Desired qualifications: 

* Experience with OCLC Connexion & MARC format

* Familiarity with Islandora and Fedora Commons

* Experience with museum collection databases

To apply, submit a digital cover letter and resume to: j.zinger@nysha.org

Job link


Job Opportunity – Architecture Librarian – City College of New York

FACULTY VACANCY ANNOUNCEMENT

The City College Library invites nominations and applications for the position of Chief of the Architecture Library. The successful candidate will be service oriented and enthusiastic in working with library patrons.

The Librarian is responsible for directing the Architecture Library (the Library) located in the Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture. The Library is one of six CCNY libraries, and the successful candidate will join a campus-wide community of approximately 21 professional librarians, 20 administrative support staff, and 50+ student assistants. The Library has a growing collection of some 30,000 architecture monographs and bound journals, subscriptions to approximately 150 architecture-related journals in print and online, both domestic and foreign. The library additionally provides access to a large and growing collection of electronic books.

The Library serves the students, faculty, and visiting professors in undergraduate and graduate programs in Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Urban Design and Sustainable Urbanism. The Library serves as a significant information resource center.

Click here for more information and application instructions.


Job Opportunity – Department Assistant – Library and Archives – MoMA

Department Assistant | Library and Archives
Provides administrative support to the chiefs of MoMA Library and Archives. Works with supervisors on annual budget preparation, processes accounts payable and receivable, and monitors departmental spending. Plans and organizes meetings and events for both departments and constituent groups, including Trustee Committee on Archives, Library, and Research and the Library Council. Tracks dues payment for the Trustee Committee and the Library Council, as well as gifts and grants for specific projects for both departments. Works with Library Council editor on yearly artist’s book project. Tracks and records staff attendance on a weekly basis. Oversees maintenance of physical plant, and relations with outside service vendors. Serves as liaison to Information Technology department. Coordinates outgoing Library exchange program. Provides administrative support for archival research functions, including fact checking, drafting letters, logging, pulling materials, and scheduling appointments. Performs administrative support duties. Reports to Chief of Library and Chief of Archives.

Requirements: Bachelor’s degree, with a major or minimum of 16 credits in art history; knowledge of modern art preferred. Minimum of three years relevant administrative experience. Proficiency in Microsoft Word, Excel, Gmail, and other standard office procedures and equipment. Excellent organizational skills. Proficiency with tracking finance and budgets. Excellent verbal and written communication skills. Ability to take direction and work as part of a team. Experience with PeopleSoft preferred.

MoMA Jobs application guidelines

If you would like to submit your resume and cover letter for consideration, please choose one of the following options:

By e-mail: jobs@moma.org (most preferred option)
By fax: (212) 333-1107
By mail: The Museum of Modern Art
The Department of Human Resources
11 West 53 Street
New York, NY 10019

Please be advised that due to the high volume of applicants, we are only able to contact those candidates whose skills and background best fit the needs of the open positions. Thank you for your interest in employment opportunities at The Museum of Modern Art.


Interview with an Art Librarian: Kim Collins, Emory University

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Can you tell us a little bit about your background and your current position?

I went from pre-med to Art History in college because that is what I liked – life is short. My dad told me most people change careers seven times in their life, but I have stuck with Art History this whole time – though in three different capacities (as museum educator, art museum librarian, and now academic art librarian). My current position is as a subject librarian that serves the Art History and Classics department at Emory University.

What drew you to this position and art librarianship in general?

When getting my Masters degree in Art History at George Washington University, I got a paid internship at the National Gallery of Art’s modern prints and drawing dept. I loved classifying and researching artworks. I worked additional jobs in the photo archive and then in the 20th century department (now known as Modern & Contemporary). It wasn’t until I was working in the High Museum of Art education department during the Atlanta Olympic RINGS exhibit that a library position to presented itself. The High Museum of Art part-time librarian left and they began looking for her replacement. With a friend’s advice – don’t hide your lamp under a bushel – in my ear, I marched into the head curator’s office and said, “Give me the job; I’ll get the MLA.” And I got the degree and the job.

What are your main roles/duties at your current position?

The more typical roles are collection development and management (which is my favorite part of my job) instruction, and research consultation. The more recent developments in my duties include Digital Humanities, Scholarly Communications, data management (ex. Digital Images), special collections, and marketing.

What is a typical day like for you?

My favorite part of my job is collections development, purchasing materials for the library, and collections management, figuring out how to fit all of our materials in the stacks. It’s the beginning of the semester, so I am also creating web guides and trying to work with faculty to set-up library instruction for classes that need it. I have taken to making a weekly To Do list that includes all my Subject Librarian stuff balanced with Humanities Team leader stuff and Service to the Library (task force on events/exhibitions, Comm for LSC, Blog Oversight Group, O&E) and professional development (ARLIS/SE is planning NOLA 2017, getting ready for Ft. Worth). There is never northing to do in this field. I also spend a lot of time mentoring other subject librarians on my team, as well as graduate student fellows.

What were/are some challenges for you as a new art librarian? Are these related to larger challenges in art librarianship?

It used to bother me (when I was a one-man show at HMA) that we do much behind-the-scenes work, and yet patrons only appreciate the tip of the iceberg. But it’s great when patrons appreciate the library in any capacity, so I learned not to mind too much.

What do you think are the most important issues facing art librarians today?

Permissions/Copyright – our IP Librarians likes to say, “Copyright kills dreams.” Students who are writing theses or dissertations cannot use images without permissions, but the cost of permissions is prohibitive.

Data Management – digital image metadata, etc.

Digital Art History – how does it become just another tool art historians use? How to guide students in this endeavor? It will become more mainstream so we need to teach people the skills and how to utilize new tools in their research and teaching.

Marketing – tell your story, the age of assessment and data.

What are the most important things emerging art librarians should know?

Relationships are HUGE – across your library, across your campus, across your field. Art Librarianship is a pretty small world. It helps to know colleagues (as well as faculty and students) who you can ask questions of or collect data from.

 

Just for fun – what is your favorite library? Work of art or artist?

I like IM Pei’s National Gallery of Art library reference library, mainly because of fond memories of the people who worked there when I was a library user. I also have fond memories of the Smithsonian’s Archives of American Art Library when it used to be housed in the Old Patent Building. But, if I have to pick just ONE library – I’ll say the Library at Villa I Tatti, The Harvard Center for Italian Renaissance Studies, outside of Florence. Its founder, Bernard Berenson (1865–1959), described I Tatti as a library with a house attached, which I love.

As far as artists, I like conceptual artists who employ word-play and irreverence – Ed Ruscha, Bruce Nauman, and Jenny Holzer.


Job Posting – Library Assistant (P/T) – Brooklyn Museum

Library Assistant (P/T)—Libraries and Archives

(Part-time, temporary, non-union position)

Requirements: The ideal candidate must have experience working in a museum library setting; excellent and accurate communication and computer skills; the ability to perform detailed work such as creating, entering, and searching bibliographic data; and knowledge of library automated systems, such as OCLC and MARC formats. M.L.S. student preferred.

Responsibilities: The Library Assistant’s main responsibilities include ordering acquisitions and recording them into a shared Library Online Catalog; maintaining financial records and processing invoices; maintaining the stacks, including labeling, shelving, and shifting the collections; packaging and mailing interlibrary loans and other library projects; circulating materials to Museum staff; assisting both the Museum staff and the public onsite and via phone, letter, fax, and email; and photocopying, scanning, and other general office work.

Work schedule: 20 hours a week, Wednesday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., first Saturdays of the month from October to June, and possible late hours on Thursdays

To apply: Please send a résumé and cover letter via email to job.library.assistant@brooklynmuseum.org.

Job link here.


Our Virtual Conference Recordings Are Now Available!

webinar_400x250The recordings from our virtual conference are now available via the ARLIS/NA Learning Portal! These recordings are freely available to all.

Click here for all recordings!

Part One: Keynote Address and Student & New Professional Presentations

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Keynote Speaker, Elizabeth Lane

Student and New Professional Speakers: Kathryn Thornhill, Morgan McKeehan, Abigail Sadler, and Hannah Marshall

Student and New Professional Speakers: Kathryn Thornhill, Morgan McKeehan, Abigail Sadler, and Hannah Marshall

Part Two: New Initiatives in Art Archives

Panel Discussion featuring: Kristie MacDonald, founder of Archiving Art Imogen Smith, Project Manager at the Dance Heritage Coalition Caitlin Harrington and Seth Persons, students at Pratt Institute and NYARC Project members

Panel Discussion featuring:
Kristie MacDonald, founder of Archiving Art
Imogen Smith, Project Manager at the Dance Heritage Coalition
Caitlin Harrington and Seth Persons, students at Pratt Institute and NYARC Project members

Part Three: Student & New Professional Presentations

Nicole Lovenjak, Country Baron, Alexandra Kadlec, and Amber Welch

Nicole Lovenjak, Country Baron, Alexandra Kadlec, and Amber Welch

Part Four: Advice Roundtable

Suzanne Rackover, Managing Librarian, Paul D. Fleck Library & Archives, The Banff Centre Ashley Peterson, Librarian, School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston Molly Schoen, Information Resources/Technical Specialist, Visual Resources Collection, University of Michigan Amanda Meeks, Reference and Instruction Librarian, Savannah College of Art and Design ACA Library, Atlanta

Suzanne Rackover, Managing Librarian, Paul D. Fleck Library & Archives, The Banff Centre
Ashley Peterson, Librarian, School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
Molly Schoen, Information Resources/Technical Specialist, Visual Resources Collection, University of Michigan
Amanda Meeks, Reference and Instruction Librarian, Savannah College of Art and Design ACA Library, Atlanta


Conversation with Erinn Paige and Laura Damon-Moore of The Library as Incubator Project (Part 1)

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Erinn Paige (left) and Laura Damon-Moore (right) are at the helm of The Library as Incubator Project. I recently talked with them about LAIP and their other endeavors.

What is Library As Incubator Project and what motivated you to embark on this adventure?

Laura: At this point, the Library as Incubator Project is a multifaceted information sharing machine. We continue to exist online, through our primary website and in social media neighborhoods. We’ve been lucky enough to publish a book based on and extending the work we do online. We also exist in “real life” through public presentations, professional development workshops, and in-person programs that we do for libraries and other cultural institutions.

At the most basic level, the LAIP began as a way to explore the connection between libraries and creative people. Erinn and I came to Library and Information services with backgrounds in the humanities and creative arts. So the LAIP started as a way to explore the connection of creativity, information, and community, to see how it happens formally and informally in the library setting, and then, because we were hearing so many great stories, we knew we had to share them with a wider audience.

What were/are some challenges and rewards in running Library As Incubator Project?

Erinn: It is a constant challenge to juggle a full time job and the LAIP, which could easily be a full time job in and of itself.  We’re both also artists in our own right (hence our interest in the library-arts connection), and supporting a creative life while sharing stories of other people’s creative lives can be a challenge too!

But the place that the whole project sprang from is an elegant support– it’s that egalitarian, helpful library space, AND it’s that hands-on creative space that you find in a studio environment.  We’re very project oriented, and so Laura and I and our team will take on individual LAIP projects that interest us, and when we hit obstacles, we have a whole team who can offer critique, just like you get in a studio:  what’s working, what isn’t, techniques that could help, skills and resources to apply. By the same token, we also really support one another in our creative pursuits.

Laura: I wish we had more time and more resources to do more, more, more! It was definitely a challenge to settle into a routine as we all graduated and juggled job stuff plus the LAIP. For a while it felt like there were a lot of balls up in the air and we were sort of scrambling to sort out who would catch which one as they fell.

Rewards have got to be the community that has developed around the LAIP. This ranges from our teammates, Katie and Holly, to our awesome site post contributors (cough cough, Rebecca, cough) to the people that we connect with on social media and in person at programs and conferences. When we go visit institutions and talk with people, people are generally excited to talk with us, but WE get so much MORE excited hearing about the amazing programs and partnerships people have going on. It’s the best and absolutely why I keep working on this.

What are your “day jobs” and how do they integrate with managing Library As Incubator Project?

Erinn: I’m the Programing Librarian at New Canaan Library in New Canaan Connecticut, which is a relatively new position for me– I just started in 2014.

Although the actual work of running the Library as Incubator Project ( web building, editing, writing, social media, presentations and conferences, etc etc) all happens on my own time, the philosophical underpinnings that guide our work on the LAIP transfer directly to programming librarianship– namely, that information isn’t always something that you can collect and slap a barcode on in order to provide access.  There’s a very real body of “creative information” (for lack of a better term) that can only be accessed in real-world connections: conversations with experts, hands-on learning opportunities, etc. Learning by doing.  Apprenticeship.

Working on the Library as Incubator Project has proven, again and again, that Libraries are central to not just an information exchange (resource –> person), but an information life cycle— people learn, people use what they learn to make something new; that new thing sparks conversation and more learning and more making and more sharing.  Through the Incubator, I’ve seen proof that we can be the alpha and omega of that life cycle, and I bring that ideal to work every day.  That’s what I want my library to be.

Laura: I am the Assistant Director at a small public library in Evansville, Wisconsin, just outside of Madison. My position focuses on Programming and Outreach, mainly with families and youth. I do everything from facilitating early literacy programs to running after school activities to planning and hosting special community programs on weekends, inside and outside of the library.

From a practical standpoint, I am able to integrate LAIP work into my routine pretty easily – I am 80% in my position at the library, so I have one weekday off where I can focus on other things, and luckily, at this point, the LAIP has become a natural part of my weekly rhythm and routine.

Like Erinn, the LAIP has done a lot in terms of directing the way that I approach my job philosophically. It’s about making a space where people feel welcome to explore, learn something new, experiment, fail, try it again, share their work, help others. From another practical standpoint, the LAIP means that we hear about a lot of awesome new initiatives and program ideas. It’s like a smorgasboard of creative arts programming that I get to pick and choose from, depending on what will work best for my community.

Be sure to catch part two of our conversation here tomorrow!