SAA Annual Meeting Recap

This year I made my first trip to the Society of American Archivists annual meeting, which was held in Washington DC. It was my first time attending a large conference, so it was a lot to take in, but I think I made the most of my time there without getting too overwhelmed! It was a quick trip, I only was there for one-and-a-half days, so unfortunately I don’t have a comprehensive report to give, but below are some of my impressions and opinions on the happenings at the conference and my experience as a first-timer.

My main reason for attending the conference was to network and augment my job search. I met with someone to look over my resume and discuss strategies for applying, and she was very helpful in giving me suggestions of places to apply to and offering to pass my resume along to colleagues. Other offerings for attendees in the midst of applying to jobs were not as helpful, however. There was a job board with postings, most of which were already on SAA’s website, and a place to post your resume, but I didn’t get the sense that either area was attracting that much attention or that career and job search services were a strong point of the conference as a whole.

As for professional development, the session I found most interesting, beneficial and probably the most useful to ArLiSNAP members, was a roundtable on visual materials cataloguing and access. In it, a panel discussed the new Descriptive Cataloging of Rare Materials (Graphics) guidelines, how they differ from and and relate to existing guidelines and how they can be implemented using MARC (DCRM(G) can also be used in EAD as well). First a “live cataloguing demo” was presented and then we split up into smaller groups to try our hand at using the guidelines to catalogue a photo album. When we reconvened as a larger group, each one had thought of different ways of titling and describing the materials (and some heated arguments ensued). It was a good reminder that there can be multiple “right” ways to catalogue, and that cataloguing is an art with guidelines to follow, but no real hard fast rules. In a room full of seasoned cataloguers all using the same set of guidelines to describe the same materials, differences abounded. Knowing that veteran cataloguers faced some of the same cataloguing quandaries I have as a new professional was reassuring, if not a bit unbalancing as well. I also attended sessions on preventative conservation, deaccessioning and teaching with primary resources. If anyone is particularly interested in preventative conservation, I have a handout from the session listing some great resources for disaster planning and risk management which I would be happy to share.

I also attended the Museum Archives Section meeting. Primarily this was a business meeting for officers, but it was interesting to see which museums were represented and what issues were discussed. Funding and administrative support seemed to be the main hot-button issues, which is not surprising coming from the non-profit sector. For those of us working in museums and other non-profit arts institutions, funding issues and defending the importance of library and archives’ place in the arts are probably things we will all have to deal with at some point in our careers.

I went solo, which might seem scary to some, but between my jam-packed schedule and the general bustle of the conference it didn’t leave much time to be intimidated. Plus, it being a fairly small professional circle, it wasn’t hard to spot former classmates and colleagues. So, even though I went alone, for much of the time I was with people I knew or networking and making new acquaintances. The biggest hindrance to attending was the cost. Being a recent graduate, I got student pricing which helped out immensely, but still there was the cost of the plane ticket, hotel room, food and transportation. I would highly recommend that any current students thinking of attending next year try to involve themselves in some way, whether it be submitting a poster or serving as a member of their SAA student chapter, to get some financial help from their program to attend.

Overall, I felt it was a great experience. There was a lot to offer for those interested in art and visual materials, and good representation from museums and other arts and cultural institutions. My goal was to network and I definitely made some great, and I hope lasting, connections. Besides trying to get help with funding, my biggest piece of advice would be to go in with a specific goal. Having networking and job hunting in my mind helped to keep me focused and not feel like I had to do everything.

Did anyone else go this year? What did you think? If anyone has specific questions about the conference itself, the sessions I attended or attending in general, feel free to email me!


Scholarship Opportunity! (sort of)

There are all sorts of homespun efforts to give money to students and new professionals that need it. Like this one:

http://www.archivesnext.com/?p=3751

ArchivesNext (a.k.a. Kate Theimer) has been crowdsourcing money for scholarships so that people can attend the Society of American Archivists yearly conference.

We’re giving money to people to fund their registration for the SAA Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C. Rather than pay for full travel or lodging for just a few people, I try to give a little bit of help to as many people as possible. This effort is not affiliated with SAA in any way. Your donations are not tax deductible. It’s simple. You send me money. I give it all away within a few weeks to colleagues who need it.

The SAA conference this year is August 10-16, 2014. The scholarships are awarded by random draw and, while individual awards may not be large, the money has the potential to help out lots of people like us to attend this amazing conference for the first time. You need to be an SAA member to apply. My quick math based on the information provided is that scholarships are probably in the $200 range.

On Saturday June 28 I will draw names out of a hat and notify the lucky people. This will allow you to register by the early-bird deadline of July 7. Once you forward me the confirmation of your registration, I will send you a check.

…. One year there were a surprisingly large number of people whose names got pulled from the hat who backed out because they hadn’t realized how high the other costs of attending the meeting would be…. please do a bit of homework first and make sure you think you really can attend the conference before you apply.

For both donors and applicants, the deadline this year is June 27th.


Call for Presenters: Emerging Technologies Forum, ARLIS/NA 2014

The Conference Program Committee, the Professional Development Committee, and the Art Library Students & New ARLIS Professionals Section (ArLiSNAP) are pleased to announce that the Emerging Technology Forum will be featured again in Washington. The session will be held on Saturday, May 3, from 2:30 until 4:30 pm at the Grand Hyatt.

The Emerging Technology Forum will feature presenters sharing their knowledge of cutting-edge technologies through hands-on demonstrations at technology stations and brief presentations.

PLEASE NOTE: The Forum will be held concurrently with the exhibits and the poster sessions.

Have you harnessed a technology tool to make your job more efficient, your teaching more effective, or your collections more accessible? Consider sharing your expertise and experience with your fellow conference attendees.

Submission deadline: Friday, February 21, 2014



Requirements for Participation:

Presenters will be required to prepare a hands-on component to demonstrate tableside at a technology station for the duration of the 2-hour session, prepare and give a brief five-minute presentation to a larger group during the 2-hour session, and provide handouts about the technology.

Presenters will be asked to provide their own hardware (laptops/tablets, etc.) for their demonstration station. WiFi will be provided.



Possible Topics:

  • Blogging (example: Tumblr)
  • Citation Management (example: Zotero)
  • Concept Mapping (examples: Compendium, FreeMind)
  • Crowdsourcing
  • Content Management Systems (examples: Omeka, Drupal)
  • GIS Mapping
  • Photo Sharing
  • Social Media (example: Pinterest)

Demonstrations of free or open-source technologies are preferred.

Examples of presentations featured in the inaugural forum held in Pasadena in 2013:

TO SUBMIT A PROPOSAL FOR THE EMERGING TECHNOLOGY FORUM, COMPLETE THE SUBMISSION FORM HERE.[https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/Emerging_Tech_Forum_2014]


Guest Post: Olivia Miller, ARLIS-SE 2013 Travel Award Winner

Olivia Miller is a recent MSLS graduate of UNC-Chapel Hill, and winner of the ARLIS/SE 2013 Professional Development Travel Award.

The Pasadena conference was an excellent first-time experience for me with ARLIS/NA!  My favorite session was probably the “Evolution of Art Reference and Instruction” on Saturday.  As a future hopeful reference and instruction librarian, it was exciting to hear about how others incorporate research into their professional lives. Speakers touched on subjects such as assessing online reference, librarian and faculty collaboration for graduate courses, providing reference and instruction for Arts Management students, and various mobile technologies that can be used for reference and instruction. I would argue that one of the best elements of the conference was just the ability to see what others believe to be important enough to dedicate the time to research and share it with others.

Presenting my topic talk, “Power Up: How to Collect for Video Game Design Students,” at the Art and Design School Division was an amazing opportunity to share my research and have great conversations with others about my ideas. Even if my collection suggestions end up not working for some institutions, I hope they at least sparked more ideas and got attendees to thinking more about these students as a user group that would highly benefit from their attention.

Getting involved with the Graphic Novel SIG was a perfect end to a fun conference weekend.  A personal and academic interest with this format brought me to the meeting, but the fact that it was new and everyone there seemed so excited about starting this new group made me want to try to help out. At this point in my professional career (the point where I’m on the job hunt), I had a hard time feeling like I could dedicate myself to a Division, Section, or SIG without knowing where I will be professionally in a few months or next year. The Graphic Novel SIG seems to be made up of individuals with a variety of interests in graphic novels, be it from a perspective of cataloging, collecting, reference, programming, space planning, and more. I felt very comfortable being in an unusual place in my career with the attendees (not that I didn’t in others, just this one moreso). I hope that wherever I end up starting my professional career at, I will be able to incorporate graphic novels into collections or programming.

-Olivia Miller


Any ALA attendees in the house?

ALA 2013 is drawing to a close, and we hope those of you who made it to the Windy City had a fulfilling experience!

We’re looking for a few good arlisnappers to provide a post-conference writeup. Did you participate in any VRC or art library-relevant sessions or see a great poster session? Visit any of Chicago’s incredible museums and want to tell us about an exhibit? Bonus points if you made it to any ACRL-Arts section meetings!

Even if you didn’t make it to any arts-focused events, what did you see that might generally be applicable to the arlisnap and ARLIS/NA community and new librarians? Interesting applications of existing or new technology? Creative approaches to instruction or outreach? Discussions of non-traditional collections? Cataloging for the zine librarian?

Tell us all about it! Email me (Stephanie) or Ellen with your details and an outline of your ALA experience. (You don’t need to have your post ready to go just yet, but we can get you scheduled.)

 


Guest Post: ACRL 2013: Professional Development Cross-Training

Erin Elzi is a Technical Services Librarian at the Bard Graduate Center: Decorative Arts, Design History, Material Culture in NYC. 

ACRL 2013: Professional Development Cross-Training

The annual ARLIS conference is rapidly closing in, and while I know many of you are gearing up for the first (or third… or 23rd) time, I’ve just returned from ACRL 2013. The theme of the conference was: Imagine, Innovate, Inspire, and I’m feeling just that – Inspired! Innovated! Imaginative! So lend me you ear while I tell you about an important part of professional development: cross-training.

Full disclosure, I’ve never been to the national ARLIS conference. It’s not that I actively avoid it, it’s just that I’ve received full-support, either through the professional development budget-line or via scholarships granted by my MLS school, to attend SLA, CAA, the IA Summit and ACRL. It’s also not that my workplace will not support a trip to ARLIS, but rather that all the other librarians here go to it, so I figure there’s greater benefit to our institution if I attend other conferences.  Cross-training, or the process of stepping outside your daily, specialized frame of reference, helps make you more than an information professional. It makes you an information ninja.  Ninjas are all at once fast, stealthy and powerful. Professional development cross-training does the same thing by strengthening the skills and knowledge you already have, while introducing ideas to help you solve problems or find that perfect tool you need to get a project off the ground.

Fortunately, my institution supports my quest for ninja status, and each year I basically have my pick of which conference to attend. Last year it was the IA Summit, which was relevant at the time, since we were in the initial stages of redesigning our OPAC. Two years ago I attended my first ACRL conference, while I was still a student, under the guises of a press pass (Here’s a tip: Offer to cover a conference for a publication. It may take care of your registration fee and is a great chance to get published!). While I had known going into library school that I wanted to work in academia – the 2011 ACRL conference reinforced that in every way. I tend to feel a bit out of place when it comes to networking-type situations, and let’s be honest – the networking opportunities are a major reason students go to these conferences. But at the ACRL conference, I never once felt out of place, or unwelcome due to my not-quite-professional-yet status. Much the same way the ARLIS-NY goes out of their way to make MLS students here in New York feel all warm and fuzzy and extraordinarily welcome in their chosen profession. Shop around if you’re still in school – you may find your library niche somewhere unexpected, even within the limitless boundaries of the ARLIS realm.

 

Beautiful Subject Analysis Visualization Poster presented by David Polley and Brianna Marshall

Beautiful Subject Analysis Visualization Poster presented by David Polley and Brianna Marshall

What was so innovative and inspiring and imaginative at ACRL this year?  The uber-popular topics this year seemed to be information literacy instruction and data curation.  While the greater part of these sessions addressed the needs of undergraduates, or disciplines in the hard sciences, I still walked away with some new tools and methodologies we can use for our grad-student only population here at the Bard Graduate Center. Including some fun open-source stuff, like new data visualization tools. Including this MOOC, which has finished, but the materials and lectures are still available.

“Digital Humanities” were also all over the place – both literally and figuratively. The ambiguous term found its way into panels and poster sessions covering everything from community building to subject analysis to online exhibitions to ACRL’s very own THATCamp. Digital Humanities are hot, people! And the projects taking place under its umbrella are often multi-media affairs and involve primary sources – things we art information pros tend to know a thing or two about. Get on board!

Omeka DH Poster session presented by Marc Bess of UNC, Charlotte.

Omeka DH Poster session presented by Marc Bess of UNC, Charlotte.

Then there were the sessions that more overtly rubbed elbows with the ARLIS crowd. A few librarians at the University of Michigan are Mapping the Motor City’s Cinemas. Another group at the University of Florida presented on raising collection awareness through online exhibits.  A duo attempting to create a digital collection of street art documentation discussed the inherent challenges with such an undertaking. If sessions that address larger issues are more your thing than individual projects, how about a panel on building metadata to make better surrogates for images and objects (hint – let’s describe the object in our own words and go from there instead of fitting the items into imperfect, existing controlled vocabularies), or how to incorporate feminist pedagogy into any teaching opportunity (which is primarily about decentralizing the classroom). Or one of the many sessions that covered assessment and proving the value of your library – not as sexy a topic as the others, but increasingly important for many institutions.

Of course there’s always room for improvement (ACRL, if you’re listening, we want more sessions on diversity and grad student services!), but there’s also no doubt in my mind that you found at least one thing in this brief ACRL recap that sparked your interest or is applicable to your own professional or scholarly needs. And that’s just a tip of the iceberg – I came back with pages upon pages of notes. Just fathom how much you would get out of attending it yourself!

 

The Honnld/Mudd Library at Claremont College holds a ReBook book arts competition each year. Brilliant!

The Honnld/Mudd Library at Claremont College holds a ReBook book arts competition each year. Brilliant!

So, should you go to ARLIS this year, and the year after that, and the year after that? OF COURSE! But don’t write off other conference opportunities as well. In addition to elevating you to ninja rank, a willingness to attend other conferences can increase your ability to attend anything at all. If you lack institutional support, or if ARLIS never comes to your town, an ALA or ACRL or SAA conference that ends up in a city near you means all you have to pay is the registration fee.  I know I plan on finally making my first ARLIS conference appearance in 2014 – D.C. is just a mere bus ride away from NYC!

If you’re already going to ARLIS as your one professional development opportunity this year, you can still get some cross-training done simply by attending sessions that may not appear to be your forte.  Are you in reference? Join a discussion on authority records! Catalogers, stop by a session on collection development! Architectural archivists, listen in on the panel of fashion bloggers! See, being a ninja is easy!

Oh – and a final lesson I learned at ACRL: if your library doesn’t already have one, get a button maker! Everyone loves a good button, it’s cheap PR, and making them is like chicken soup for the weary researcher, staff member, and even the faculty or curator’s soul. But it looks like ArLiSANP already knew that!


Reminder: register now for early-bird conference pricing!

Pasadena 2013 looms ever nearer! Register by the end of this Wednesday, April 3 to take advantage of early-bird pricing. For all of you new professionals who no longer have that cushy student discount to take advantage of, this can mean some pretty significant savings.

Student registration pricing remains the same, but if you’re hoping to attend a workshop, those go open to the public on April 4, so you’ll want to get your name on those lists as quickly as possible.

Still undecided about the conference? Why not take a look at the online program to see the many amazing presentations, panels, workshops, and tours being offered?

Need a roommate? Check #arlis2013roomies on twitter or ping the arlis-l listserv!

Overwhelmed by it all? Give the Conference Survival Guide a look.


Top Tips for All Pasadena Conference Goers!

This post coming to you courtesy of Nancy Norris, Pasadena 2013 Publicity Chair.

Welcome First Timers and Veterans!

Before the Conference:

  • When booking your flight, consider leaving on Monday or even Tuesday. The conference hotel room blocks cover Monday night. On Sunday night, the Convocation will take place from 7:00-8:30 in the beautiful Pasadena Civic Auditorium. The event will feature keynote speaker Piotr Adamczyk from Google Cultural Institute and ARLIS/NA award winners will be announced. After the ceremony, there will be a reception with sweets and savories. If you stay over, you can take advantage of the tours and workshops on Monday!
  • Register at the Early-bird rate for maximum savings. If you register by April 3, you can save $100.00! Student rates are the same.
  • Register for a tour or a workshop (or both!). These are great opportunities to see local sites and institutions or expand your professional skills. They are also an excellent way to meet fellow conference attendees. You never know who might sit next to you in the classroom or on the bus or Metro!
  • Considering sharing a room at one of the conference hotels. If you are already have a room or if you are need to find a room, send an email to ARLIS-L(the society’s listserv) or try Twitter hashtag #arlis2013roomies. Sharing a room can help when you are traveling on a budget! The conference hotels are the Sheraton Pasadena and the Hilton Pasadena.
  • Sign up for a Conference Guide. The Conference Networking Program provides conference newbies with a more experienced ARLIS/NA member to show you the ropes and introduce you to new colleagues. Submit the registration form by April 15: Conference Networking Questions? Contact Maggie Portis, mportis@pratt.edu.
  • Take a look at the online conference program. You can pre-plan what sessions and events you want to attend and personalize your Schedule. Sign in and let your friends and colleagues know you are interested in a particular event.
  • Bring business cards. If your institution or school doesn’t provide them for you, make your own using any word-processing software and perforated paper. Or use one of the many websites like Moo.com that offer design and printing.
  • Pack comfy shoes. There are many great destinations, such as museums and restaurants, within walking distance of the Convention Center.
  • Plan your thirty-second elevator introduction. In other words, be able to summarize who you are and what you do professionally in half a minute. Need tips on your elevator speech? Click here.
  • If you’re coming to the conference on a job search, bring resumes and pin one on Registration/Hospitality desk bulletin board.
  • Do you have a burning question about the conference or Pasadena? Send us a message on Facebook or Tweet us. We are happy to help to provide an answer, we’re librarians after all!

During the Conference:

  • Tweet using #arlis2013! If you’re enjoying a particular session or event, let other people know about it. Even if you don’t have an account, you can still read Twitter and pick up some great conference tips in real time.
  • Dress in layers. Be prepared for warm days and cool nights. Also conference room temperatures can vary.
  • Have healthy snacks and keep a refillable water bottle on hand. Across the street from the Convention Center is Gelson’s supermarket. They have grab and go lunch options, snacks, regular grocery store items plus a café. The Convention Center has water coolers.
  • Arrive with plenty of time on the first day to pick up your Registration Bag with Conference Program, name badge, and more. The Registration and Hospitality desk opens on Thursday at 7:00am. Check the online program for all the Registration and Hospitality desk hours. Be sure to take a look at the conference program, which will contain area maps and general information. Also, be sure to look in your bag for other “goodies” including our stellar Restaurant Guide.
  • Session-hop. You don’t have to stay for the full length of a session. The speakers and their presentation titles in the conference program are listed in the order in which they will be presented. If you calculate about twenty minutes a talk, you can estimate when to head to another panel. Keep in mind, if you want to “session hop” please try to grab a seat near a door so you can easily slip in and out without disturbing others.
  • You can use your laptop or smart phone during a session. Typing notes during a talk is okay; so is tweeting. Just be mindful of your neighbors and respectful of the speakers. And don’t forget to silence your devices!
  • Ask a question. Moderators usually reserve time at the end of the session for audience questions. Write down your question in advance, and make sure that it’s a question related to the discussion. Don’t forget to state your name and your institutional affiliation, so that people might remember you. Feel free to offer one of your business cards. If you’d like to respond to the presentations with your own comments, talk to a speaker afterward and get his or her email.
  • Get involved in the profession. All the meetings at the conference are open to all attendees. If you are curious about a Committee, Division, Division, Special Interest Group, Chapter, go to the meeting and check it out! Introduce yourself to leaders or representatives afterward to see how you can become more involved or just be bold and speak up when opportunities to volunteer are mentioned! To learn more about the organization of ARLIS/NA take a look at the website: ARLIS/NA.
  • Partner with friends or colleagues to cover sessions happening at the same time. It’s not possible to do everything, so decide in advance who will attend each session and take notes. You could then meet after the sessions, or wait until you get home to regroup and discuss and share with your local Chapters.
  • Don’t spend all your time only with your friends. You’re at the conference to network, so leave your comfort zone and set a goal to meet at least two new people every day.
  • Visit the Exhibitors Hall. Exhibitors are the life-blood of our conference and it’s important to visit as many as you can. It’s costly to exhibit at a conference, especially for small and specialized presses. Our exhibitors are excited about attending our conferences and many are also ARLIS/NA members and have been loyal since the earliest days of the Society. They will want to know what your institution is, so make sure your badge is visible. Exhibitors take pains to display their products and services.
  • Don’t be shy about browsing, even leafing through interesting titles. If you feel uncomfortable because you can’t make purchases for your institution, just be upfront about that. They’ll understand. But do tell them you are looking for your own pleasure or edification. Smile and be friendly even if you can’t stop at every table. Finally, in the last hours of the exhibits, some vendors will discount certain titles even more than the generous conference rate, so you might score a bargain for your personal collection.

After the Conference:

  • Follow up with your new contacts. Send an email to those you’ve networked with, to follow up on a question or discussion, or just to say “It was a pleasure meeting you.”
  • Complete the post conference survey. A conference survey will be sent out on ARLIS-L by the next conference planning committee. Your feedback is important to ARLIS/NA so we can continue to plan stellar conferences!
  • Submit a proposal for the next conference. The next conference planning committee will put out a call for proposals for the Washington D.C. conference in 2014. Watch ARLIS-L for details!

We look forward to meeting all the First Time Conference Attendees in Pasadena!


Conference Travel Awards: Deadline Extended!

Students and new grads, take note! If you’d like to attend the Pasadena 2013 conference, the ARLIS/NA Travel Awards Committee has a number of funding opportunities available. They accept applications through this coming Monday, February 4, so get yours in soon!

See all of the awards and application information here.


CFP: New Voices in the Profession

Call for Papers – New Voices Panel at ARLIS/NA Conference

Paper proposals for the New Voices in the Profession session at the 2013 ARLIS-NA conference in Pasadena are now being accepted!

New Voices showcases exceptional academic work by students and new professionals (under 5 years post MLS). Paper topics should relate strongly to Art and/or Visual Resources Librarianship, but also digital library projects, archives, library instruction, reference and the changing nature of libraries, among other topics.

To see papers presented in past sessions, please view Conference Proceedings from previous years on the ARLIS website (http://www.arlisna.org/news/conferences/conf_index.html). Papers will be selected by representatives from ArLiSNAP and the ARLIS/NA Professional Development Committee.

If interested, please submit the following to Kim Detterbeck at kimberly.detterbeck@purchase.edu by January 11, 2013:

  • Presentation title
  • Presentation abstract (250 words)
  • Your name, institutional affiliation, and email address

Please feel free to re-post. http://arlisnap.org/2012/11/07/cfp-new-voices-in-the-profession/


CFP deadline extended, ARLIS/NA- Mountain West fall conference

Proposals for the ARLIS/NA-Mountain West chapter fall conference are now being accepted through Monday, July 9. (See the original post here for more details.)


Grant, webinar, and other professional development opportunities!

See educational opportunities, such as CFP, workshops, events, webinars, etc.? Please email Braegan Abernethy (bcabernethy[at]gmail[dot]com) or Emilee Mathews (mathewse[at]indiana[dot]edu) to get them posted here.

For ongoing opportunities and deadlines, please visit the new Educational Opportunities Calendar.

REMINDER: The final deadline for Papers, Sessions, and Workshops Proposals for the ARLIS/NA 2013 Annual Conference Crafting Our Future is this Friday, June 29.

Call for Contributors
A new website devoted to art, thought, and surprise inspired by the content found in freely available digital archives, Each Moment a Mountain is seeking contributions and collaborations with writers, archivists, teaching librarians, and other educators.
www.eachmomentamountain.org
Contributions
Each Moment a Mountain is looking for contributors in the following categories: blessays (see http://www.dancohen.org/2012/05/24/the-blessay/), fiction, poetry, music, visual/multimedia art, and interviews of artists and scholars working with the concept of memory. More information on submissions can be found at the following URL:
http://www.eachmomentamountain.org/submissions/
Collaborations
Each Moment a Mountain is also looking for history educators, teaching librarians, archivists, and others interested in using the site as a pedagogical tool. The editors are open to your ideas, but provide the following as examples of the collaborations we’re looking for:
-The design and execution of information literacy sessions, student assignments, or classroom activities around the use of Each Moment a Mountain in your classroom (including both responses to the site and student contributions).
-The nomination of archives to be featured on the site.
-The development of curricular tools and documentation that illustrate use of Each Moment a Mountain to meet curricular standards like The Common Core, VALUE rubrics, and others.
-Sustained partnerships and titled positions for the right collaborators.
Potential contributors and collaborators can get in touch with the editors at eachmomentamountain@gmail.com. All are welcome to follow Each Moment a Mountain on Twitter for content updates and more: @eachmomenta

Nancy Pearl Presents Book Lust Rediscoveries
Tuesday, July 10, 2pm Eastern
Join esteemed Seattle librarian Nancy Pearl in conversation with two authors from her new book series, Book Lust Rediscoveries, a publishing program devoted to reintroducing some of the best (and now out of print) novels originally published between 1960-2000. Each new edition is personally selected by Nancy Pearl and includes an introduction by her, discussion questions for book groups, and a list of recommended further reading. She will be joined by Rhian Ellis, author of After Life, and Frederick G. Dillen, author of Fool, to discuss the series, as well as their own favorite moments of discovering a wonderful book. The discussion will be moderated by the series’ editor, Alan Turkus, and hosted by Booklist Adult Books senior editor Donna Seaman.
https://alapublishing.webex.com/mw0307l/mywebex/default.do?nomenu=true&siteurl=alapublishing&service=6&rnd=0.6519851798076816&main_url=https%3A%2F%2Falapublishing.webex.com%2Fec0606l%2Feventcenter%2Fevent%2FeventAction.do%3FtheAction%3Ddetail%26confViewID%3D1002700739%26%26%26%26siteurl%3Dalapublishing

 
The Visual Resources Association’s 31st Annual Conference will be held in Providence, Rhode Island, from Wednesday, April 3 through Saturday, April 6, 2013, in the Providence Biltmore, a cherished architectural treasure.
Proposals are now being solicited for the 2013 program sessions, workshops, papers, special interest/user groups, and case studies.  All proposals are welcome, especially those related to the 2013 VRA Conference theme, “Capitalizing on Creativity”.   Click here to go to the conference proposal form, which can also be accessed through the Visual Resources Association page.
A session is a 90 minute moderated session with 3 to 4 speakers at 20 minutes each followed by a facilitated brief question and answer period.
A workshop is a 3 to 4 hour workshop to develop skills and experience in the field of Visual Resources, preferably with hands-on activities.
A paper is an individual idea submission, which will be reviewed for possible grouping into a session.
A special interest group is a 60 to 90-minute informal facilitated group discussion on topics related to a specific community within VRA.
A case study is detailed information about an individual, small group, or project, generally including the accounts of subjects themselves.  Moderators are encouraged to submit proposals.  Individual case study proposals will be reviewed for possible groupings similar to the session format.
The quality of conference content depends upon YOUR ideas and contributions, so get those creative juices flowing.  Use the “Capitalizing on Creativity” conference theme, suggested topics from VRA members (see below), and your imagination to propose ideas which expand our outlooks beyond that which is familiar.  If there is an area of concern or interest that you feel has not been adequately addressed in previous programs, do consider participating in this process by submitting a proposal.  Moderators may put out calls for speakers within a proposed topic before submission of completed topics.  The VRA Executive Board will be looking for complete, concise and articulate submissions with lists of presenters, when applicable. Specificity regarding audio-visual needs including live internet connectivity is recommended.
To stimulate the creative process, here are some excellent suggestions for proposal themes and topics selected from the post-conference survey responses, listed in no particular order:

  • VRC physical space issues
  • Cross-disciplinary outreach
  • Multidisciplinary cataloging
  • African art cataloging
  • Project and time management
  • Copyright sharing
  • Open access
  • Budget cut impacts
  • Digital content archiving and preservation
  • Digital asset management
  • Digital Humanities initiatives
  • VRC/Library collaboration
  • Fate of VR analog collections
  • VR curators/teachers (dual roles)
  • eBook and eJournal image content
  • Crisis management
  • Image tagging
  • Digitizing and access of student work

Questions about the proposal process and the various presentation formats included in the VRA Conference program can be directed to me at .
The proposal deadline is July 27, 2012.  I look forward to receiving your proposals!

Visual Resources Association Foundation Professional Development Grant
Purpose:
The purpose of the VRAF Professional Development grant is to support professional development in the field of visual resources and image management. The grant will support attendance at an educational event of the grantee’s choosing (such as an association conference, symposium or workshop), or engagement in relevant research activities (such as publications and/or fieldwork). In recognition of the differing professional development needs for an emerging professional and an established career professional, two awards will be funded. One grant will be awarded to a student or new professional who has up to five years of experience in the field, and the other grant will be designated for a career professional with six or more years of experience. At the discretion of the VRAF Board and with approval of the applicant, an application may be moved to a different category that better fits the experience criteria or the applicant can choose to withdraw the application
Although the specific criteria for the grant may change from year to year in order to provide support for a range of experiences and community members, with the 2012-2013 awards we encourage the VR community to consider opportunities at any visual resources-related professional development venue.
The VRAF Professional Development Grant is part of the Foundation’s mission to advance awareness of critical issues for effective digital information management (including intellectual property and copyright); to encourage the application of professional standards, innovative technology, and metadata cataloging protocols; and to facilitate workplace training. The VRA Foundation supports a range of educational offerings to help ensure that such information reaches a diverse, global audience.
Award Amount:
Each of the two 2012-2013 awards will provide a grant of $850. The grant is for use between September 1, 2012 and August 31, 2013.
Eligibility:
The grant is open to all visual resource professionals, including retirees and those currently unemployed. The Foundation also encourages students seeking educational, training, and research opportunities in support of broad access to cultural information, to apply. Membership in the Visual Resources Association is not required. Each applicant’s financial statement of need will be considered, together with other applications for funding for the same event or project, which must be disclosed by the applicant.
Grant monies may be used for:

  • transportation
  • registration/tuition
  • accommodations
  • meals
  • research
  • expenses

Application Deadline and Decision Announcement:
Applications for the 2012-2013 grants due: Friday, July 20, 2012
Award decision public announcement: August 31, 2012
Guidelines and Application Form: http://vrafoundation.org.s119319.gridserver.com/index.php/grants/professional_development_grant/
Application Form:
http://vrafoundation.org/downloads/VRAF_PDGrantCall_for_Applic2012.doc
http://vrafoundation.org/downloads/VRAF_PDGrantCall_for_Applic2012.pdf
Completed applications, as well as any preliminary questions, should be sent via e-mail to:
Alix Reiskind, VRA Foundation Board Director areiskind@gsd.harvard.edu

Infopeople’s webinar “Hack Your Career: Dream Job FTW!”
Title:  Hack Your Career: Dream Job FTW!
Presenters: Nicole Pasini and Jesse Lanz
Format:  Webinar
Date:  Wednesday, July 18, 2012
Start Time: 12 Noon Pacific
            1PM Mountain
            2PM Central
            3PM Eastern
This webinar will last approximately one hour. Webinars are free of charge.  Registration is ONLY done on the day of the event on the WebEx server starting 30 minutes before the start of the webinar. No Passwords are required.  For Tips and Registration Information, please go to http://infopeople.org/training/webcasts/tips.html
For more information and to participate in the Wednesday, July 18, 2012 webinar, go tohttp://infopeople.org/training/hack-your-career

  • Do you know what your dream job is, but don’t quite know how to get it?
  • Are you an ideal job candidate with less-than-ideal interview skills?
  • Are you stymied by the civil service process?

There is no denying that the job market is tough these days, but there are steps you can take to ensure that your next interviewer sees you as the best candidate for the job.  And for those of you who are employed, there are steps you can take to ensure that the work that you do today could help land your dream job someday.  
In this one-hour webinar you will:

  • Learn to approach the job search and interview process from the perspective of the person doing the hiring.  
  • Gain insight into how to think strategically about your current job, as well asabout how to prepare to get the next one.
  • Discover tips for navigating the often baffling world of the civil service application and interview.  
  • Learn the things that hiring managers wish every job candidate knew.  

Though we can’t promise a recovery of the job market, we’re certain that in this webinar you’ll learn ways to Hack Your Career—Dream Job, For the Win!
At the end of this one-hour webinar, participants will:

  • Identify the three questions they need to answer before beginning the job search process.
  • Understand the three major ways that civil service hiring processes differ from hiring processes in the private and nonprofit sectors.
  • Identify ten steps that go into successful resumes, applications and interviews, from the perspective of hiring managers.

This webinar will be of interest to public library staff (though there will be plenty of useful information for staffs of all types of libraries), library school students, job seekers, or any people who are thinking about the next stage of their careers.  
If you are unable to attend the live event, you can access the archived version the day following the webinar.  Check our archive listing at:  http://infopeople.org/training/view/webinar/archived


Call for Proposals: ARLIS/NA Mountain West Chapter 2012 Conference

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

WIDE ANGLE: Perspectives on Visual + Media Arts Information
ARLIS/NA Mountain West Chapter 2012 Conference
September 13-15, 2012
Park City, Utah

The Mountain West Chapter of the Art Libraries Society of North America invites proposals for their upcoming conference, which will examine current and future issues in libraries, archives, museums, and cultural heritage institutions for art, film, and media. We welcome proposals for sessions and/or papers on any of the following themes as they relate to art, architecture, film, or media studies:

  • the role of information professionals in the teaching of these disciplines
  • future directions in the acquisition, preservation, or cataloging of visual materials
  • the future of the art library, the film library, or the media collection
  • new developments in copyright and fair use for visual material
  • assessment, planning, outreach, or marketing of services or collections
  • other relevant areas of interest to information professionals working with art, film, media, and related disciplines

Featuring a keynote lecture on filmmaking in Utah, an opening reception at Park City’s Kimball Art Center, and an in-depth discussion of Robert Smithson’s Spiral Jetty, the conference will take advantage of both the scenic beauty and cultural significance of Utah and the American West in art, film, and visual and material culture.

Please submit an abstract of no more than 250 words to kahn.meredith@gmail.com by July 2, 2012. Please specify if you are submitting a paper (20 minutes) or a session (panel of 3 papers, 20 mins each). Please include the names, titles, and affiliations of all presenters. The ARLIS/NA Mountain West Chapter welcomes submissions from students, new professionals, librarians, non-librarians, and interested individuals from outside the Mountain West region. You do not need to be a member of Mountain West or ARLIS/NA to submit a proposal.

About Park City, Utah:
Situated in the unparalleled beauty of the Wasatch Mountains, Park City is home to the Sundance Film Festival, numerous opportunities for year-round outdoor recreation, and innovative dining and spirits.

About ARLIS/NA Mountain West:
The Mountain West Chapter of the Art Libraries Society of North America serves Arizona, Colorado, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming. ARLIS/NA is the leading professional organization for art information professionals in libraries, museums, archives, and cultural heritage institutions.

Meredith Kahn
Past Chair, ARLIS/NA Mountain West Chapter
Publishing Services & Outreach Librarian
University of Michigan Library
http://publishing.umich.edu/
@M_Publishing & @m_kahn


Reminder: ARLIS/NA 2013 conference proposals due next Friday, June 22!

If you’re still considering submitting a proposal for next year’s conference, take a look at the email below. As Braegan posted earlier, you can also see Emilee Matthew’s RISS blog post on how to develop a conference presentation.

From the ARLIS-L listserv:

Dear Colleagues,

The clock is ticking! The Friday, June 22 deadline for Papers, Sessions, and Workshops Proposals for the ARLIS/NA 2013 Annual Conference Crafting Our Future is less than two weeks away.

If you are still scratching your head, thinking about what you could share with attendees in Pasadena and on the fence about submitting a proposal, let the following list inspire you. The Toronto Evaluation Survey respondents had the opportunity to answer an open-ended question about what topics and subject matter they would like to see covered at the Conference. The Program Committee distilled these responses; the most frequently named topics are below.

Topics (starting with most often mentioned)

  • [Research & Scholarship] “art history” (2) / future of arts and humanities scholarship / research methods / art bibliography / research sources for Dadaism, Post-Fordism, Post-Situationism, new media / role of the art library in documentation and research of art collections
  • [Teaching & Instruction] Curriculum – arts and design students / art undergraduate students / learning in the library / teaching modules, learning objects / using technology, web 2.0 with art & design students during research instruction / visual literacy (2)
  • Museum library-related topics / Museum Library needs / museum studies / museums / Art museum collections information / Curatorial
  • Copyright & licensing / Book Arts Copyright / current cases – international / copyright, open access / arts-specific copyright update at ALL annual conferences
  • Film / film studies / Film, Digital, Music librarianship / Film, Television & Media Industries / video and animation
  • [Future of the profession] Is there a future for art librarians outside of art museums / Alternative careers / librarians adapting to multi-disciplinary roles / Librarians’ roles expanding in museums towards information managers that deal with collection metadata / Transformation of the art library in a center of research
  • Collection development / patron driven acquisitions / performance art (how to collect the media supporting it) / Photography and special topics in new options/tools of collection development
  • Video arts/preservation / preservation / digital preservation
  • Zines / zines & artist publishing / Concrete example of how other librarians/libraries are dealing with artist’s books, zines and artist multiples in their collection. Not necessarily in a collection development context, rather cataloguing and classification, exhibitions, programming, marketing and outreach.
  • [Collaboration] cross-disciplinary nature of art/architecture / take arts specialization to any other units or departments or share their expertise with people in other fields / International collaborations
  • Disaster preparedness / crisis, disaster management / Disaster Planning and Conservation
  • Resource sharing / Interdisciplinary approaches to art-related resources / Visual resource initiatives: efforts to share cataloguing, provide more open collections, work with campus community
  • Space planning and renovations / Space planning (when the shelves are full) / Designing library spaces to encourage inspiration, creativity, and creative collaborations. Can we get an architect and some local EDU librarians to present on this?

Links to the online proposal forms are on the Conference website: http://www.arlisna.org/pasadena2013/.

If you have questions please let us know. Happy “crafting”!

Sincerely,

Your Pasadena 2013 Program Co-Chairs

Cathy Billings
Brandy Library & Art Center
cbillings@ci.glendale.ca.us

Sarah Sherman
Getty Research Institute
ssherman@getty.edu


Conference, CFP, and Webinar

See educational opportunities, such as CFP, workshops, events, webinars, etc.? Please email Braegan Abernethy (bcabernethy[at]gmail[dot]com) or Emilee Mathews (mathewse[at]indiana[dot]edu) to get them posted here.

For ongoing opportunities and deadlines, please visit the new Educational Opportunities Calendar.

2012 Digital Library Federation (DLF) Forum

The 2012 Digital Library Federation (DLF) Forum is seeking proposals for presentations, panel discussions, workshops, research updates, and hands-on, problem-solving sessions. The Forum is a working meeting where DLF members come together to discover better methods of working through sharing and collaboration. Participation is open to all those interested in contributing to and playing an active part in the successful future of digital libraries, museums and archives services and collections.
Managing the digital content lifecycle is a complex challenge, requiring creative and collaborative approaches. In that spirit, and to maximize the Forum’s benefit and better facilitate the community’s work, the Forum’s schedule will provide many opportunities to actively engage and network.
For the 2012 DLF Forum, the Program Planning Committee is requesting proposals within the broad framework of digital collections and their effect on libraries, museums and archives services, infrastructure, resources, and organizational priorities. Proposals should strive to contribute to the following topics:

  • Digital technology design
  • Management and assessment
  • Data
  • Collaboration

We welcome proposals on these and other areas from current community members and non-members who are interested in joining the DLF community. For more detailed examples, please see the 2011 DLF Forum schedule: http://www.diglib.org/forums/2011forum/schedule/.

Session genres include:
Presentations and Panels: Traditional lecture format with question-and-answer sessions. Speakers are requested to use only half of the allocated time for the presentation, including how they wish to engage the DLF community in their work. The second half of the session should focus on conversations about next steps, engagement with the community, and clarification of points raised during the presentation.
Workshops: In-depth, hands-on training about a tool, technique, workflow, etc. You can recommend a topic or trainer, or you can volunteer to share your own expertise.
Research Updates: An opportunity for those working in digital collections research to present their preliminary findings for community feedback and discussion.

Working Sessions: Creative problem solvers, including project managers, developers, and/or administrators, gather to address a specific problem. This does not have to be a computational problem. The approach can be applied to workflow issues, metadata transformations, or other complex problems that would benefit from a collective, dynamic solution approach.
Community Showcase: A modified poster session. Presenters will have the opportunity to interact with Forum participants to discuss their current research projects, and/or demonstrate tools or services they have developed or are using in their digital library environment. Demos must include a poster element.
Proposal Submission Guidelines and Evaluation Procedures
Complete proposals should be submitted using the online submission form(http://www.diglib.org/forums/2012forum/2012-dlf-forum-proposal-submission-form/) by 11:59 PM on July 1, 2012. Proposals must include a title, session leader, session genre, proposal description (maximum 300 words), and proposal abstract (maximum 100 words).
After an initial review by the Program Planning Committee, all proposals will be posted on the DLF website for community polling. The community vote will be taken into consideration, and the Program Planning Committee will make the final decisions. Those submitting complete proposals will be notified of their status by August 10, 2012. Presenters will be guaranteed a registration place.

Archives and Activism

Call for Papers

“The rebellion of the archivist against his normal role is not, as so many scholars fear, the politicizing of a neutral craft, but the humanizing of an inevitably political craft.”
— Howard Zinn “Secrecy, Archives, and the Public Interest,” Vol. II, No. 2 (1977) of Midwestern Archivist.

The boundaries between “archivist” and “activist” have become increasingly porous, rendering ready distinctions between archivists (traditionally restricted to the preservation of records, maintaining accountability, and making critical information available to the communities they serve) and activists (who, with greater frequency, look to archives or adopt elements of archival practice as a means of documenting their struggles) virtually unsustainable. In the past year, archivists and citizen activists collaborated to document the Occupy Wall Street movement, and archivists committed to open government worked with the New York City Council to advocate for keeping the Municipal Archives as an independent city agency. While the apparent convergence of archival and activist worlds may appear a timely and relevant topic, these distinct communities often deliberate their roles separately with little dialogue.

The Archivists Round Table of Metropolitan New York and the New School Archives and Special Collections are sponsoring a symposium to bring together a diverse group of archivists, activists, students, and theorists with the aim of facilitating discussion of their respective concerns.  Among its proposed topics, the symposium will address potential roles that archivists may engage in as activists, as well as how archivists can assume a greater role in documenting and contributing toward social and political change.

Possible areas of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

-Archivists documenting the work of activists and activist movements
-Activists confronting traditional archival practice
-Possible models for an emergent “activist archives”
-Methodologies for more comprehensively documenting activism
-Archivist and activist collaborations -Community-led archives and repositories operating outside of the archivalestablishment
-Archives as sites of knowledge (re)production and in(ter)vention -Relational paradigms for mapping the interplay of power, justice, and archives
-Critical pedagogy in the reference encounter
-Interrogating preconceptions and misunderstandings that obscure common goals

Date: Friday, October 12, 2012

Location: Theresa Lang Community and Student Center, The New School

All individual presentations will be 20 minutes long (10 page paper).
Submissions must include a title, name of author and institutional affiliation (if applicable), abstract (250 words max), and indication of technological requirements.
Individual papers or entire panel proposals accepted.

Deadline for Proposals: Proposals should be emailed to admin@nycarchivists.org by August 1, 2012.

Embedded Librarians: What, Why, & How

Date/ Time: Tuesday, June 26, 2012

10:00 am – 12:00 noon EDT

Location: Online – Your desk or conference room.
Registration: $10 SCRLC members; $15 non-members; $25 Groups
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for all librarians and staff, especially those who work with distance learning students and remote library users. Academic and school library staff are encouraged to attend.
Tech Support: You will need –

• An Internet-connected computer

• Computer speakers or phone for sound

• Computer projector if a group is ‘attending’

Funding: This training is funded in part by Federal Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) funds, awarded to the New York State Library by the Federal Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS).

Embedded librarianship is a great way to reach distance and remote patrons and bring services and resources to them wherever they are.  But the term embedded librarian does not mean just one thing: it is an umbrella term that includes a number of service models and levels of activity.  What, exactly, are the service models, and how can a library choose and implement the best model to fit their needs?  This session will examine best practices for embedded librarianship by looking at several successful models and considering goals, design, and assessment of an embedded librarian program.

Presenter:
Laura Saunders received her PhD from Simmons College Graduate School of Library and Information Science in May 2010.  She was a reference librarian and branch manager of the Career Resource Library for Simmons College, where she provided reference and instruction services, as well as participated in collection development, Web page maintenance, and marketing of library services.  While completing her PhD, she worked as an adjunct faculty member.  Currently, she is an Assistant Professor at Simmons College, teaching in the areas of reference, evaluation of information services, information literacy, and academic libraries. Her first book, Information Literacy as a Student Learning Outcome:  The Perspective of Institutional Accreditation comes out in June 2011. Her research interests include information literacy, assessment, accreditation, reference services, and the place of libraries in higher education.  She has had articles published in The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Library & Information Science Research, College & Research Libraries, and portal: Libraries and the Academy.


Webinar, virtual pre-conference, conference sign-up

See educational opportunities, such as CFP, workshops, events, webinars, etc.? Please email Braegan Abernethy (bcabernethy[at]gmail[dot]com) or Emilee Mathews (mathewse[at]indiana[dot]edu) to get them posted here.

For ongoing opportunities and deadlines, please visit the new Educational Opportunities Calendar.

Free Webinar > Copyright Series: Interview with Cable Green, Creative Commons

May 24, 2011 (Thursday) at 2:00 pm ET

Guest: Cable Green, Director of Global Learning, Creative Commons

Registration Link Available Via

[ http://bit.ly/L7ozAS ]

ALCTS ALA Annual preconference: “The How and Why of Research: What Is the Rock in Your Shoe?”
June 12 – 14, 2012.

All sessions begin at 2 p.m. Eastern, 1 p.m. Central and 11 a.m. Pacific time.

This virtual preconference provides insight and guidance into the world of research, encouraging attendees to discover the research possibilities inherent in their daily work.  Find out how valid research questions can grow out of practical professional quandaries.  Learn how to choose appropriate questions to investigate, how to design effective research strategies and explore avenues for sharing results with colleagues.  Demystify the research process and be encouraged  to contribute to the body of knowledge in the discipline.  This virtual preconference is aimed at librarians entering the profession and/or new to the research process.

This virtual preconference is comprised of three one-hour sessions:

Tuesday, June 12
“Avoiding the Research Rubbish Bin: How to Begin a Research Project” with Allyson Carlyle,  University of Washington Information School.

Wednesday, June 13
“From Curiosity to Concept: Developing a Research Plan from Everyday Library Issues” with Steven A. Knowlton, University of Memphis.

Thursday, June 14
“Bringing your Work to Press: The Peer Review Process” with Sandy Roe, Illinois State University and editor, Cataloging and Classification Quarterly.

Visit the “How and Why” page on the ALCTS website.

Registration is open now.  Individual sessions for each preconference are $39 for ALCTS members, $49 for non-members, $99 for groups and, as always, free to LIS students.  A discounted rate is available if you want to register for all the sessions included in each preconference:  $95 for ALCTS members, $118 for non-members and $258 for groups.  Register through ALA Online Learning.

If you have any questions, please contact Julie Reese, ALCTS Continuing Education, jreese@ala.org.

Joint Conference of Librarians of Color early bird registration closes at midnight June 13
Early bird registration for the Joint Conference of Librarians of Color (JCLC), Sept. 19-23 in Kansas City, Mo., closes Wednesday June 13.
JCLC is a conference for everyone—with engaging speakers, special events and more than 70 concurrent sessions exploring issues of diversity in libraries and how they affect the ethnic communities who use our services!  Early bird registration provides attendees with the best rates for this exciting event.  For complete details, visit http://jclc-conference.org.
JCLC is an experience like no other! Emmy® winner Sonia Manzano, voted one of the most influential Hispanics byPeople en Espanol for her work playing Maria on “Sesame Street,” will welcome attendees at the opening keynote.  Author, director and activist Jamal Joseph will join JCLC as the closing general session speaker.  There will be numerous opportunities to network and socialize, including an opening reception at the beautiful Kansas City Public Library’s central branch.
Under the theme, “Gathering at the Waters: Celebrating Stories and Embracing Communities,” JCLC provides a unique setting for learning with three pre-conferences and more than 70 concurrent sessions in five tracks—Advocacy, Outreach and Collaboration; Collections, Programs and Services; Deep Diversity and Cultural Exchange; Leadership, Management and Organizational Development; and Technology and Innovation.  Author luncheons will allow attendees to get up close and personal with award-winning authors, including Lauren Myracle, Sharon Flake, Da Chen and David Treuer.  A busy exhibit hall will feature the latest from library vendors and partners.
The Crown Center, the city within a city located in the heart of downtown Kansas City, will offer attendees the luxurious accommodations of the Westin Kansas City and Sheraton Kansas City, along with three levels of great shopping, dining and entertainment.  Hotel rates start at $139.
JCLC is sponsored by the five associations of ethnic librarians—the American Indian Library Association (AILA), the Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association (APALA), the Black Caucus of the American Library Association (BCALA), the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA) and REFORMA, the National Association to Promote Library and Information Services to Latinos and the Spanish Speaking.  The first Joint Conference was held in Dallas in 2006.
More information may be found at http://jclc-conference.org.


Reminder: ARLIS/NA 2012 New Voices Panel submissions!

Papers are being accepted through Thursday, Jan. 12, so there’s still time to submit!

Call for Papers – New Voices Panel at ARLIS/NA Conference

Paper proposals for the New Voices in the Profession session at the 2012 ARLIS-NA conference in Toronto are now being accepted!

New Voices showcases exceptional academic work by students and new professionals (under 5 years post MLS.) Paper topics should relate strongly to Art and/or Visual Resources Librarianship, but also digital library projects, archives, library instruction, reference and the changing nature of libraries, among other topics.

To see papers presented in past sessions, you can look at the Conference Proceedings from previous years on the ARLIS website (http://www.arlisna.org/news/conferences/conf_index.html). Papers will be selected by representatives from ArLiSNAP and the ARLIS/NA Professional Development Committee.

If interested, please send a paper topic and detailed abstract to mportis@nysid.edu by January 12th. Please feel free to re-post.


Gerd Muehsam Award reminder!

Are you a student with an art libraries-relevant paper or project? Interested in presenting your work at the next conference?

If you’ve missed it, the deadline for the 2012 Gerd Muehsam Award is this Friday, November 18.

From the ARLIS-L listserv:
Sponsored by the Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA), the Gerd Muehsam Award is given annually in recognition of excellence in a graduate student paper or project on a topic relevant to art librarianship. The award was established to honor the memory of Gerd Muehsam (1913-1979), distinguished scholar, teacher, and art bibliographer, whose support of and dedication to ARLIS/NA was an inspiration to her colleagues and students.

Award Details

  • $500 award
  • Up to $300 travel reimbursement to attend the ARLIS/NA 40th Annual Conference in Toronto, Canada, March 29-April 2, 2012
  • Registration fee to this conference
  • Opportunity to present the winning paper at the conference as part of the New Voices panel
  • A one year membership to ARLIS/NA

Requirements

  • The paper or project must have been created or written during the preceding 18 months by a graduate student enrolled in an accredited graduate library program or in a post-graduate library school program in art history or a related discipline
  • The paper or project must be in conjunction with a course assignment
  • One submission is allowed per person

Read the rest of this entry »


SAA Museum Archives Pecha Kucha Opportunity for SAA 2011

Museum Archives Section Meeting Repository Updates
Pecha Kucha Style Call for Proposals SAA 2011
Thursday, August 25, 3:30 pm – 5:30 pm
Deadline for submissions: July 29, 2011

Are you a member of the Museum Archives section of SAA? Do you have a repository update or an interesting new collection to share?

If so, please submit a brief proposal for a Pecha Kucha style presentation during the annual meeting of the Museum Archives section at the 2011 SAA conference. We look forward to accepting proposals that relate to museum archives, highlight new collections, or include repository news or highlights. To submit a proposal, please send a brief abstract of your topic, your name, institutional affiliation, and contact information, to Leanda Gahegan at leanda.gahegan@gmail.com. The deadline for proposals is July 29,2011.

Presenters must be a member of the Museum Archives section. If you are not a member yet, please feel free to join. More information is available here:

http://www.archivists.org/saagroups/museum/index.htm

The Museum Archives Section of the Society of American Archivists includes those who are responsible for the organization and care of archival collections located in museums.

About the Pecha Kucha format: Pecha Kucha sessions consist of multiple presenters, each having approximately 6 minutes and 40 seconds to present 20 PowerPoint slides on their topic. Timing will be strictly followed.


Museum-Computer Network Conference Scholarships Available

via ALA Lita-L:

The Museum Computer Network is providing NINE scholarships to attend this year’s MCN Conference:

I/O: The Museum Inside-Out/Outside-In: 38th Annual MCN Conference
October 27th – 30th, 2010, Austin, Texas

The competitive scholarship provides free conference registration, free hotel stay, and a $50 stipend to cover additional expenses. To apply, please submit application form found at http://www.mcn.edu/mcn-2010-scholarships by August 13.

Applicants must meet ONE of the following criteria for eligibility:

1.  Employed at an institution with no more than 20 permanent staff
2.  First-time MCN conference attendee
3.  New to the profession with less than 2 years experience in the field

See http://www.mcn.edu/mcn-2010-scholarships for more information about the scholarship program.

Questions?  Please contact Scholarship Committee chair Jana Hill at jana.hill(at)cartermuseum(dot)org.

Founded in 1967, the Museum Computer Network has been serving the cultural heritage community for over 40 years. The Museum Computer Network (MCN) supports the greater museum community by providing continuing opportunities to explore, implement, and disseminate new technologies and best practices in the field.

Please pass this on to your colleagues. You can also contact Christina DePaolo, Conference Chair with questions about the conference, at 206 654-3165 or christinad(at)seattleartmuseum(dot)org.