Job Postings: Digitization Project Manager, Baruch College

Baruch College, a senior college of the City University of New York, is currently seeking applicants for a Digitization Project Manager position in its Archives and Special Collections Department. The Digitization Project Manager will assist with a year-long grant-funded project (July 1, 2015-June 30, 2016) to digitize and provide access to print materials in the Institute of Public Administration Collection. The Institute of Public Administration (IPA) was an educational and consulting organization with roots going back to 1906, whose aims were the creation of an efficient, honest and professional government.

The successful candidate will work in collaboration with the Digital Initiatives Librarian to create a work plan for the digitization project.  Duties include establishing, implementing, and documenting workflows for the capture and storage of digital objects; inputting metadata; training and supervising two scanning technicians and student workers; and providing quality control on scans.

Experience: supervisory role managing digital projects, working knowledge of metadata and archival description standards (DACS, EAD, MODS, METS, and Dublin Core); knowledge of best practices for preservation of, and access to, digital collections; and experience generating checksums.

Requirements: The successful candidate will have a Master’s in Library Science (MLS) or closely related discipline.  This position requires at least two years of experience working on digitization projects and managing workflows.

Full time, Temporary from July 1, 2015-June 30, 2016. Compensation: $50,000. Application Deadline: May 20, 2015. Please send resume/CV and letter of recommendation to Professor Jessica Wagner, Digital Initiatives Librarian at Baruch College, Jessica.Wagner@baruch.cuny.edu.


Job Posts in Canada this week: Young Canada Works, part three

Museum Assistant – Research Intern, Langley Centennial Museum, Langely, BChttp://www.civicjobs.ca/101.asp?jobpostingid=26529&description=&provcode=BC&rid=&employer=&location=&pcid=82&searchby=yes&submit=+Go+#.VTEJ2PnF-Ig

As a student employee in the Recreation, Culture, and Parks Division of the Township of Langley, the incumbent will work on a short-term research project at the Langley Centennial Museum.  The project will be an investigation into the work of the Royal Engineers – Columbia Detachment 1858 to 1863 and their role in the settlement, development and security of the newly formed Colony of British Columbia and an investigation into the life and achievements of Sapper Philip Jackman – the last surviving member of the Columbia Detachment, community pioneer and former Reeve/Mayor of the Township of Langley.

The Incumbent will also work under the supervision of the Museum’s Curator in the areas of collections and exhibitions programs planning, development and execution to the benefit of the greater community and museum visitors.

Programming Assistant / Collections Assistant (Summer Student), Wetaskiwin & District Heritage Museum, Wetaskiwin, AB

http://www.rcip-chin.gc.ca/emplois-jobs/voir-view/detailler-detail-eng.app?id=3076&p_nav_perpage=10&p_nav_from=31

http://www.rcip-chin.gc.ca/emplois-jobs/voir-view/detailler-detail-eng.app?id=3075&p_nav_perpage=10&p_nav_from=31

The Collections Assistant will be an integral member of the Heritage Museum team through their support in the area of collections management. The summer student will work with our Collections Manager to improve collections procedures in the areas of storage, preservation, and expansion of information in the research files and collections database. The Collections Assistant will also have the opportunity to assist in other areas of museum operations including reception and programming.

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The Programming Assistant will be an integral member of the Heritage Museum team through their support with museum programs, events, and exhibits. Further, they will be given the opportunity to assist with the development, research, and presentation of several projects. The emphasis of this work will be their assistance with our “Women of Aspenland” program, which currently houses over 80 profiles of local women, and is the largest collection of its kind in Canada. For more on this project visit our website at http://www.wetasiwinmuseum.com. The Programming Assistant will also help with special events as well as tours, and have the opportunity to work in other areas of museum operations including reception, administration, and marketing.

Museum Programs Assistant, Philip J Currie Dinosaur Museum, Wembley, AB

http://curriemuseum1.staticmedia.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/SummerEducationStudent.pdf

Job Duties: • Participate in promotion of programs through on-line material, school visits and community events • Create and present age-appropriate programming for both the public and school age children • Conduct Bonebed tours • Assist with developing educational material for museum interpretative programs

Museum Assistant, Miles Canyon Historic Railway Society, Whitehorse, YT

http://www.yuwin.ca/Jobs/Posting?Id=7068

The Miles Canyon Historic Railway Society (MCHRS) runs a local, community museum, called the Copperbelt Railway & Mining Museum. The museum assistant will be responsible for the general operations of the Museum.

Program Assistant, Wallaceburg & District Museum, Wallaceburg, ON

http://www.rcip-chin.gc.ca/emplois-jobs/voir-view/detailler-detail-eng.app?id=3137&

The successful candidate will split the majority of their time between expanding the museum’s Newspaper Index and running our children’s Summer Camp. The student employee will be recording interesting stories and historical details into a computer database for future reference. The Summer Camp will run for three weeks during the course of the contract period. The camp’s programs have already been created; the participant will be responsible for delivering, advertising and further developing these programs. In addition, the student will be expected to design and implement one day’s worth of new programming.

Researcher and Cataloguer / Digitizer, Holocaust Memorial Museum, Montreal 

http://www.mhmc.ca/media_library/files/2015_CSJ_Agent%20de%20Catalogage_JG.pdf

http://www.mhmc.ca/media_library/files/2015_CSJ_Recherchiste%20FR.pdf 

Description des tâches et des responsabilités: – Numérisation des artefacts et des photos selon les normes de conservation; – Documentation des artefacts et des photos selon les lignes directrices établies; – Transfert des fichiers à un catalogue en ligne; – Assister la Coordonnatrice Musée avec les dons d’archives.

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Responsabilités principales : Documenter la thématique générale de l’exposition; Produire un rapport de recherche; Repérer les collections, archives et autres ressources pertinentes pour le développement des contenus de l’exposition; Effectuer des recherches iconographiques.

And a summer job without the YCW stipulations:

Collections Assistant (Museum of Zoology), University of Alberta, Edmonton

http://www.careers.ualberta.ca/Competition/S106626227/

 Museums and Collection Services, University of Alberta invites applications for a self-motivated and energetic Collections Assistant. Reporting to the Collections Management Advisor (Natural Sciences), the successful candidate will work in a team environment to assist with the reorganization and storage upgrade of the University of Alberta Museum of Zoology’s Mammalogy Collection.


Internship Opportunities: Multiple Positions, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, NY, NY

Internships available in digitization and records management.

https://archivesgig.wordpress.com/2015/04/09/new-york-ny-multiple-paid-internships-lincoln-center-for-the-performing-arts/


The Aura of Materiality: Digitization as Preservation

Guest Post by Jasmine Burns

When I started my MLIS degree in Spring 2014, it was immediately apparent that my research interests were much more theory-based than those of my colleagues. The practical nature of LIS can sometimes make it challenging for me to engage with my professors and peers in a meaningful way. For this reason, I was very excited when I was approached to write this post for ArLiSNAP, in which I will highlight some of the recent research and work that I have been conducting in the area of digitization and the digital surrogacy of visual materials. I whole-heartedly encourage any feedback and invite further conversations on the topics that are discussed here.

My research on this topic began with the thesis for my MA in Art History, which focused on the nature of digital surrogacy in relation to medieval manuscripts (a version of which was published in the most recent issue of Art Documentation). Here, I look into issues of materiality, virtuality, and the consequences of the digital reformatting of cultural heritage objects. This thesis was from the perspective of a researcher, rather than that of an Information Professional. Once I started my MLIS coursework, and the limitations of my arguments became clear, I started thinking about how issues of digital surrogacy translate to practical librarianship. This led me to start researching the topic of digitization as a method of preservation.

By Photo d'identité sans auteur, 1928 [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

By Photo d’identité sans auteur, 1928 [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

I decided to frame the argument around Walter Benjamin’s often-cited text “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction,” and limit the scope of the overall work to archival photographs in particular. Benjamin states that the aura of an object is tied to its unique existence in time and space, and that this is essentially lost in reproductions because it breaks the object from ritual. This argument is widely applied to technology and digital media (via Jean Baudrillard’s Simulacra and Simulation), especially in discussions of photographs. In utilizing this particular lens to discuss the question of whether or not digitization is a viable method of preservation, there are two popular outlooks: 1) as long as the content is fully captured then the photo is adequately preserved; or 2) photographs are three-dimensional objects and photographic meaning is derived not from content alone, but also from the material evidence of its manufacture and use (i.e. aura) and if those elements are lost through digitization, then the object is not fully preserved.

My work in Digital Collections allows me to confront these issues on both a practical and theoretical level. I entered this investigation fully convinced that digital reformatting could never preserve the full scope of material and visual information contained in photographs because of the elimination of the material vessel. Therefore, the digital surrogate was merely a placeholder, or a reference to the original, and had little to no value outside of its ability to disseminate photographic content. However, as I dove deeper into theories of reproduction and representation, I discovered that these notions of value are socially constructed and derive from the dichotomy of copy versus original that is so deeply ingrained into our society, particularly through museum culture. Such notions are exacerbated by our object-centered culture, whose focus is on tactility, tangibility, and originality as authenticity. By perpetuating these ideas, as well as the argument that a reproduction does not carry value outside of its connection to the original, we are limiting any potential uses and values of digital media.

Ultimately, I have ended up flipping Benjamin’s argument on itself in favor of digital surrogacy. Without the tangibility of a photograph, the lack of materiality becomes the defining feature of the surrogate. It sounds strange, but hear me out: instead of viewing the elimination of the material vessel as a limitation to the uses and value of a surrogate, the creation and dissemination of digital representations of physical photographs constructs a framework for preserving these very qualities. Through the surrogate’s inseparable relationship with the socially constructed centrality of the original, and its inherently material existence, the digital object is both referring to the original, and existing as a unique object to be valued, maintained, and used. Therefore, although the material elements of the photograph are “lost” during digitization, the surrogate itself takes the place of the aura, as the more a work is reproduced, the more significant it becomes. The best way I can describe this is through the Mona Lisa. How many times have you seen reproductions of the image of that mysterious woman? How many of you have seen the actual painting? Do you remember any of the paintings in the room with her? I certainly don’t. Because you have encountered the reproduction on such a large scale, the act of viewing the original painting is greatly enhanced, and almost ritualized. The material qualities are so apparent in this encounter that it hardly matters that you have studied its content hundreds of times before.

So, is it good to have a healthy dose of skepticism, and follow Jean Baudrillard’s idea that technology will only create a self-referential society, devoid of actual meaning? Or do we need to move forward and embrace new theories of digital cultural heritage that promote new contexts for understanding digital surrogates through connections with their physical counterparts? What are some of your thoughts or experiences with digital surrogates, either as a researcher or practitioner?


Job Post: Digital Archivist, Workman Arts Project of Ontario, Toronto

http://current.ischool.utoronto.ca/jobsite/2015/digital-archivist

Workman Arts Project of Ontario (Workman Arts) facilitates aspiring, emerging and established artists with mental illness and addiction issues to develop and refine their art form through its arts training programs, public performance/exhibition opportunities and partnering with other arts organizations. As well, Workman Arts promotes a greater understanding of mental illness and addiction through the creation, presentation and discussion of artistic media in five disciplines: music, theatre, literature, visual art and media art.
Founded in 1987 as a theatre company of eight members (individuals with mental illness and limited arts training), over the past 27 years Workman Arts has evolved into a multi-disciplinary professional arts organization engaging over 300 member artists, at various stages of developing their practice. Through an increasingly entrepreneurial approach, Workman has empowered and collaborated with thousands of artists with mental health and addiction issues who have performed or exhibited to audiences in prestigious venues nationally and internationally.
Workman Arts is currently in the process of consolidating its body of knowledge and developing a theoretical framework that will allow the organization to evolve from a practice-based service provider to an evidence-based leader and change agent.

Reporting to the Project Manager and working with a small group of interns, the Digital Archivist will be responsible to develop and direct the documentation process, structure and tools required for a Workman Arts Digital Archives.
Responsibilities:
• Review issues of consistency, format, standardization and metadata in the beginning of the process;
• Create preservation indicators (Establish DA inclusion criteria, and process);
• Assess long term value of the information;
• Develop a collection policy that includes what to archive , determining extent to archiving links and refreshing site contents;
• Develop a plan for changes to access mechanism, rights management and security;
• Train Interns on system, collection policy, software and process to review, tag, scan and catalogue;
• Monitor interns progress regularly and provides ongoing direction as required;
• Develop user friendly guide on how to use the Digital Archives system and provides training to Project Coordinator and WA staff; Interns
• Develop a collection policy that includes what to archive, determining extent, archiving links and refreshing site contents

Two year part-time consulting contract. Total compensation $15,000

Apply by email:

Info@workmanarts.com

Application deadline:

Feb 2 2015

How to apply:

Send your application to: info@workmanarts.com
Please quote Application for Digital Archivist in the subject line and submit the following:
• Cover letter stating why you are interested in this position
• Current CV
Note: Only applicants selected for an interview will be contacted. Interviews to be held February 9 – 13, 2015
We will not accept emails or telephone inquires regarding this position.
Workman Arts is an equal opportunity employer.


Job Posting: Collections Cataloguer, Princeton Art Museum

The Princeton University Art Museum (PUAM) is seeking a museum professional to help us digitize and catalog the approximately 5,200 Master Set gelatin silver prints within the Minor White Archive. The ideal candidate will rise to the challenges surrounding the direct capture of photographs and the subsequent cataloging of complex material. This is a wonderful opportunity for those with an interest in 20th century photography to immerse themselves in the creative process of a single artist, and to play a significant role in making a collection widely accessible for the first time.

This work is related to a recently awarded IMLS grant. This position is funded as a full-time, one year term (start date as soon as possible) but is also open to folks who may prefer to commute to Princeton on a part-time basis over a longer term, extending through the end of the grant period (October 2016). Experience with tethered capture, studio lighting & balancing, proofing, metadata, digital image processing, cataloging tombstone & inscription elements needed. The position will work closely with both Photography/Visual Resources and Collections Information staff in the Museum throughout the project.

Please apply online via the Princeton jobs website<https://jobs.princeton.edu/applicants/jsp/shared/Welcome_css.jsp>, Requisition Number #1400835, position title Collections Cataloger.


Job Posting: Cataloguing and Digitization Archivist, Stratford Festival Theatre, ON

(via the ARCAN-L listserv; no link!)

Would you like to play a meaningful role with North America’s leading classical repertory theatre? At the Stratford Festival, we attract the world’s finest talent, offering a unique experience for staff, artists, and actors alike. If you would like to be a part of this exciting organization, we are looking for someone to fill the role of….

Cataloguing and Digitization Archivist

This full time position will report to the Director of Archives and will divide their time equally between two major areas of responsibilities;

• Digitization of archive content for the purposes of a) preservation, b) reuse by the Festival in the context of marketing, production support, etc; and c) research by external researchers.

• Surveying, accessioning and cataloguing of material in the Archive to improve the management and exploitation of the collections

Main tasks will be as follows:

• Copyright and rights investigation and documentation

• Digitization pre-processing work

• Digitization of collections (incl photographic preservation and creation of catalogue entries for object access) according to guidelines

• Active input to the development of the above processes

• Surveying of material currently in the Archive and retrospective accessioning of this material

• Accessioning of new material that enters into the Archives

• Cataloguing materials to relevant standards as prioritized by the Director of Archives and creation of authority records

You must hold a professional archives qualification and have practical experience of working in a busy archive department. Experience of cataloguing, digitization and use of software such as Adobe PhotoShop is required. Familiarity with Canadian copyright and information law in an archival setting is also necessary; knowledge of theatre and experience working in a theatre environment would be an asset.

We recognize that diversity – in our workplace, in our audiences and on our stages fosters a rich and creative environment. We are actively engaged in building a more diverse workplace and encourage all qualified applicants to apply by December 5, 2014 to;

Human Resources

Stratford Festival

E-mail: resumes@stratfordfestival.ca


Job Posting: Liaison Librarian (Digitization Project), University of New Brunswick, Saint John, NB

Reposting in its entirety; there is no link:

Liaison Librarian

Term: January 1, 2015 to April 30, 2015 (4 Month Term)

The Hans W. Klohn Commons at the University of New Brunswick Saint John seeks a Liaison Librarian for a four month term position. Depending on the background and qualifications of the incumbent the liaison responsibilities may include Science Fiction and Fantasy, Philosophy, Languages, English and Gender Studies. Projects assigned during the term include preliminary work on the digitization of the UNBSJ Science Fiction and Fantasy Fanzine Collection (see https://iss.unbsj.ca/?p=121 for a link to the partial inventory).

The Saint John campus of the University of New Brunswick, located in Tucker Park overlooking the beautiful Kennebacasis River Valley, which serves a population of approximately 2500 students. Information Services and Systems has 5 librarians, 10 library assistants, and 9 technical staff providing educational and technical support to students, faculty and staff. Library services are provided from the Hans W. Klohn Commons (http://www.unb.ca/saintjohn/iss/). Service in the Commons is provided to students at the Information Desk for technology and library access services, and through on-call service at Research Help Services.

Qualifications:

REQUIRED

Qualifications include a MLS/MLIS degree from an ALA accredited institution with coursework or experience in digitization of documents, and/or digital preservation. An undergraduate background in the humanities and knowledge of and interest in science fiction and fantasy would be an asset. Further, the candidate will have excellent communications skills and an in-depth knowledge of print and online information resources. Demonstrated instruction experience is required, as is the ability to work within a collaborative environment.

Applying:

This position is subject to budgetary approval. This is a four-month term position which will be filled at the rank of Librarian I or II based on qualifications.

Candidates should send a letter of application and names of three references to:

Karen Keiller

hwkcommons@unbsj.ca

Director, Information Services and Systems

University of New Brunswick

P.O. Box 5050

Saint John, NB E2L 4L5

Fax: (506) 648-5701

Only those candidates that are short-listed will be contacted for an interview. Please confirm that we have received your application. Applications will be reviewed starting on November 30, 2014.

All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority. Applicants should indicate current citizenship status.

THE UNIVERSITY OF NEW BRUNSWICK IS COMMITTED TO THE PRINCIPLE OF EMPLOYMENT EQUITY


Job Post: Imaging Services Specialist, the Menil Collection, Houston, TX

(reposted from the MCN listserv; no link, sorry!)

Title:                           Imaging Services Specialist
Department:               Registration
Reports to:                  Digital Asset Manager

The Menil Collection seeks a qualified individual to support the Registration Department with Rights and Reproductions requests as well as Imaging and Cataloguing duties.

General Responsibilities:
The Imaging Services Specialist processes internal and external requests for images of objects in the collection to be reproduced, seeing requests through from initial contact through to providing deliverables. The Imaging Services Specialist also assists with special projects such as ARTstor image contributions, a large-scale museum-wide digitization initiative, and implementation of digital asset management software.

Specific Rights & Reproduction Duties:
*   Respond to public requests for photographic material to be reproduced.
*   Initiate rights and reproductions contracts and invoices, establish rates for usage.
*   Maintain databases (transparencies, CDs, contacts, etc.), process agreements and invoices, and track receipt of copies of publications.
*   Assist with research and resolve copyright permission issues related to the reproduction and filming of collection objects for print, website, and press use.
*   Update licensing and photography agreements, as needed.
*   Work with various museum departments (including Curatorial, Membership, and Publications) to secure copyright permission for reproductions featured in Menil Collection publications.

Specific Imaging Duties:
*   Scan and/or photograph transparencies, negatives, slides, and documentation.
*   Assess digital image files for quality assurance purposes and identify images that need to be rescanned or photographed from their original formats.
*   Organize, maintain, and properly store all Menil Collection visual resources, including transparencies, photographic prints, and digital images.
*   Assist with new photography of collection objects as well as photography of objects borrowed for temporary exhibitions, as needed.
*   Maintain the Imaging Services studio space, image library, and supplies.

Specific Cataloguing Duties:
*   Research, vet, enter, and update credit lines and photography credits in the collection management database (TMS).
*   Research, vet, enter, and update image metadata into the digital asset management software.
*   Organize, archive, and file images in the image library.

Desired Skills:
*   Thorough knowledge of intellectual property law, including “fair use” and similar copyright issues is required, as well as the ability to interpret and communicate copyright information to the layperson.
*   Ability to professionally and diplomatically correspond with artists, artist foundations and estates, museums, artist rights societies such as ARS and VAGA, and the general public.
*   Thorough understanding of digital still image file creation including image sizing, bit depth, color profiling, image resolution, compression, and creating derivatives.
*   Working knowledge of digital archiving standards and best practices including file naming and embedding and extracting metadata from and into digital image files according to standards and workflows.
*   Basic knowledge of The Museum System (TMS) and digital asset management software.
*   Moderate skill level with Photoshop and Acrobat.
*   Familiarity with Microsoft Office Suite, particularly Excel and Word.
*   Ability to work both on the Mac and PC.
*   Knowledge of digital cameras, scanners, lighting, and light tables.

Experience:
*   A minimum of three to five years’ experience in a Rights & Reproduction role is highly desired, preferably at a museum, image archive, or other arts-related or non-profit organization.
*   Digital imaging experience in an Imaging studio at a museum, photo archive or agency preferred, but not required.
*   Expertise in cataloguing and archiving, media conservation, and knowledge of developments in the digital field required.
*   A BA in an arts-related field such as Media Studies, Museum Studies, Art History, etc. with knowledge or appreciation of art and architecture including modern and ancient art is preferred.
*   Experience working in a fast-paced, results-driven environment with tight deadlines.
*   Must enjoy working both collaboratively and independently.

Salary and benefits competitive and commensurate with experience.  Please send resume and cover letter with salary expectations to:  Human Resources, the Menil Collection, 1511 Branard Street, Houston, Texas 77006.  Application materials may also be emailed to:  smmaloch@menil.org<mailto:smmaloch@menil.org>.


Job Posting: Digital Imaging Fellow, Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, TX

http://www.cartermuseum.org/jobs/digital-imaging-fellow

The Amon Carter Museum of American Art seeks a qualified individual to support the operations of the Collection Information and Imaging department related to IMLS digitization grant activities. Responsible for digital imaging activities including photographing negatives, transparencies, archival records, and ephemera; processing digital images; embedding metadata into individual image files; creating derivative image files; performing OCR on textual documents; and handling archival materials.

This is a temporary full-time, 35-hour per week position, Monday through Friday through September 30, 2016. There is the possibility of an extension beyond that date pending funding availability. Reports to Collection Information and Imaging Manager.

Satisfactory completion of post-offer drug and background screens required. Application deadline is October 15, 2014.

Please submit letter of application, resume, and references to HR Manager, Amon Carter Museum of American Art, 3501 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth, TX 76107. Fax (817) 665-4315 or Email human.resources@cartermuseum.org.


Library Assistant III- The Getty

Overview:
Working under the supervision of the Digital Library Specialist and the Head of Digital Services, the Digital Library Assistant: participates in the creation and maintenance of digital collections; works closely with staff in Digital Services, Special Collections Cataloging, Information Systems, and other Getty Research Institute units; converts audio-visual digital master copies to streaming media formats; creates derivatives of digital images, video, and audio; analyzes, maps, extracts, and transforms existing cataloging data into usable metadata for digitized materials using Excel, Perl, XSL; creates ingest packages for the digital repository and performs ingest procedures. Knowledge of data modeling, metadata schemas, and controlled vocabularies and thesauri preferred. Knowledge of archival and library descriptive practices helpful.
Responsibilities:
* Utilizes solid understanding of digital imaging, audio, and video best practices, capture devices, and file formats* Applies digital library policies, industry standard software applications and production methodologies to create streaming audio and video files* Manages fulfillment of Digitization on Demand requests in a timely manner

* Performs regular troubleshooting and quality control of digital assets, filenames, and database functionality

* Demonstrates ability to learn and employ processing scripts and style sheets to transform files and metadata

* May work with born-digital materials and participate in discussions regarding their preservation and access

* Maintains awareness of current trends and developments in the field

* Applies advanced knowledge of libraries, online systems, and records

Qualifications:
* Bachelor’s degree in art history or related discipline; Master’s degree preferred* Minimum 4-5 years related experience* Familiarity with digital repository functionality, digital preservation issues and metadata standards

* Demonstrated understanding of audio visual preservation and access file formats such as Motion JPEG2000, WAV, MPEG, MP4 and MP3

* Experience using software such as Adobe Premiere and SONY SoundForge for AV editing

* Ability to work independently, exercise good judgment, discretion, and initiative

* Excellent written and verbal skills; attention to detail

* Reading knowledge in at least 1-2 foreign languages preferred

Apply here.


Professional development: CFPs, webinars, and volunteer opportunities

As always, you can also see what’s coming up through the Educational Opportunities Calendar. Keep reading for details about all the great webinars, CFPs, volunteer opportunities and more below!

CFP:

HTML5 and CSS3: Ready for Prime Time? Online Conference

Topic: HTML5 and CSS3

Deadline for Proposals: December 14, 2012

Conference Date: February 8, 2013

Location: Online

Form for Call for Proposals

HTML5 and CSS3 are two major web development standards today. Both have moved web authors into the present with options for incorporating more semantic elements, easier audio/video inclusion, APIs, and an ever-increasing formatting feature set. But how well supported are they today? Is it practical to use these standards with the browsers available today? Are there ways to incorporate parts of these standards or do web pages have to incorporate the entire standard? What are the “gotchas?”

This is the focus of Amigos’ February 8, 2013 online conference. We are looking for web developers that deal with library websites and have, either successfully or unsuccessfully, started incorporating HTML5 and/or CSS3 functionality. We’re searching for practical stories of what worked, what didn’t, and what you learned along the way. Do you use a HTML5/CSS3-compliant content management system? Or try to? Have you incorporated multimedia using HTML5? Are you using media queries? Have you started using more advanced selectors? We want to hear about everything related to HTML5 and CSS3.

The online conference will be held Friday, February 8th, 2013. We are looking for 45-minute sessions throughout the day. If you are interested, complete and submit our “Call for Proposals” form and we’ll be in touch. If you know someone who might be interested, please forward this invitation to them. We are looking for anyone who does web development, even indirectly, on your library’s website – whether they are library employees or not. All presenters will be comped for the conference!

The deadline for submitting proposals will be Friday, December 14, 2012.

FYI – We are fortunate to have Christopher Schmitt as our keynoter. Well-known for his work with the Web Standards Project , he heads the new media company and web design company called HeatVision.com and is the author of several books on standards-based web design.

If you have questions, please contact Christine Peterson, 800-843-8482 x2891.

 

 

CFP:

2013 Transitions in Collections: Print to Digital Workshop (Michigan Library Association)

Transitions in Collections: Print to Digital

Books, Bytes & Beyond

Friday, March 8, 2013

Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI

CALL FOR BREAK-OUT SESSION PROGRAM PROPOSALS

Submissions welcome through January 8, 2013

How is your library navigating the transition from print to digital resources? Have you found success in locating, organizing and managing digital resources? What innovative strategies are you using to help users’ access digital resources and successfully use them? What emerging digital resource trends is your library experimenting with?

Now in its third year, the 2013 Print to Digital (P2D) Workshop continues its emphasis on the ongoing transition from print to digital collections, looking at how libraries are effectively navigating the process. Geared toward academic, public, school and special librarians, this year’s event seeks to help participants identify emerging trends and gain a greater understanding of how to manage and access digital resources.

We invite your proposals on topics ranging from collection development issues to digital rights management to determining the cost/benefit of implementing new digital services to educating users on accessing and using digital materials. Consider sharing your experiences with others and submitting a program proposal!

Please submit your proposal by email and include the following information:

• Session title

• Description of session

• 1 Goal & 2 Objectives for your presentation

• Presenter(s)’ names, titles, organization

• Presenter(s)’ contact information

Note: All presentation rooms include a computer and projection capability.

Proposals will be accepted until Tuesday, January 8, 2013. Presenters will be notified by Friday, January 11, 2013 that their submissions have been accepted.

Please use this email subject line format: 2013 MLA P2D Call Proposal + Your Presentation Title + Your Name

Send proposals to Stephanie D. Davis, davisstephand@jccmi.edu

 

 

Webinar:

You are invited to attend a special joint webinar co-organized by ARLIS/NA and ACRL Arts Section. Attendance is free, but you must be a current member of either ARLIS/NA or ACRL Arts. Use the link below to register; you will receive the webinar login information once your membership status is confirmed. Hope to see you there!

Imagining, Innovating, Leading: Exploring the Connections Between Librarianship and Creativity

Join us for a Webinar on December 7

Space is limited.

Reserve your Webinar seat now at:

https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/366707872

ARLIS/NA and ACRL Arts Section members are invited to attend this special joint webinar that explores the role of librarians’ individual creativity and its effects in the library workplace and greater community.

Tina Chan, Reference/Instruction Librarian at SUNY-Oswego, will discuss On My Own Time, a community event that celebrates the creative talent of faculty and staff who are visual artists “on their own time.” SUNY Oswego participated in On My Own Time to recognize employees’ individual artistic talents and to foster imagination and creativity among employees. (Chan’s presentation is encored from the ACRL-Arts discussion forum at the 2012 ALA annual conference.)

Annette Haines, Art & Design Field Librarian at the University of Michigan, will explore the existing theories and ideas on workplace creativity and how they apply to librarianship. Haines stresses the imperative of putting creative work first and offers strategies librarians can apply to manage workplace stress and foster creativity in themselves and others. (Haines’ presentation is an encore from the 2012 ARLIS/NA annual conference.)

*Attendance is limited to current ARLIS/NA and ACRL-Arts members only. Registration will close at 11am Central on 12/7/2012. A limited number of seats are available and successful registration does not guarantee a reservation. Attendees are encouraged to log-in just before the start of the webinar to help ensure a seat. By registering for this event you allow your name and contact information to be shared with the membership committees of ARLIS/NA and ACRL-Arts for analysis and possible follow-up. A recording for this webinar will be made available for members two weeks after the webinar date. Questions may be directed to webinars@arlisna.org

Title:

Imagining, Innovating, Leading: Exploring the Connections Between Librarianship and Creativity

Date:

Friday, December 7, 2012

Time:

1:00 PM – 2:00 PM CST

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar.

System Requirements

PC-based attendees

Required: Windows® 7, Vista, XP or 2003 Server

Mac®-based attendees

Required: Mac OS® X 10.5 or newer

Mobile attendees

Required: iPhone®, iPad®, Android™ phone or Android tablet

 

Call for volunteers:

The 2013 Conference Planning Advisory Committee is seeking volunteers to assist with the ARLIS/NA 41st Annual Conference. We need volunteers to assist with the registration/hospitality desks, tours, and exhibit hall during the conference, 25 – 29 April, 2013 in Pasadena, CA. Please consider contributing to the conference by volunteering two to three hours of your time. Interested volunteers may contact Virginia Allison-Reinhardt (virginia@lalouver.com) or Krista Ivy (krista.ivy@ucr.edu) with your name, email, institution, and category of interest. We will be in touch with a call for desired shifts once the conference schedule has been published. This is a great way to get to know fellow art library professionals. Many thanks for considering!

Virginia and Krista,

2013 Hospitality/Registration Co-Chairs

Virginia Allison-Reinhardt:

virginia@lalouver.com

Krista Ivy:

krista.ivy@ucr.edu


Internship Posting: digitization intern for the Field Book Project

The Smithsonian Institution seeks a summer digitization intern for the
Field Book Project, a joint initiative by the Smithsonian National Museum
of Natural History (NMNH) and the Smithsonian Institution Archives (SIA).
Internships are 10-12 weeks and must take place between June 1 and August
31, 2012.

PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The Field Book Project is seeking an intern to work
with the primary source field book collections in the Department of
Botany. The Field Book Project is a collaborative initiative between the
Smithsonian Institution Archives and National Museum of Natural History
and works to improve access to primary source field notes, expedition
journals, photographs, and other materials documenting field work for
scientific research and discovery. The field book collection spans more
than 150 years of scientific field work and contains manuscripts and other
materials that document information on specimen collections that may not
be available on the specimen labels or in published literature. Interns
will reproduce original works in digital format for a myriad of imaging
products.

QUALIFICATIONS: The intern must be able to handle delicate manuscripts
carefully, should have a healthy respect for historic collections, and
should be interested in learning about best practices and techniques for
digital imaging in an archival repository. Attention to detail for quality
control purposes is a must. Any previous experience with digitization
and/or knowledge of digital image file formats, settings, embedded
metadata and naming conventions should be mentioned in the application.

AWARD PACKAGE: None

TO APPLY:  Send a resume, two references, and a cover letter detailing how
the internship relates to your academic or career goals to Carolyn
Sheffield at sheffieldc@si.edu<mailto:sheffieldc@si.edu>.

DEADLINE:  February 25, 2012.


Temporary Part-Time Cataloging Librarian, Elgin, IL

Immediate Temporary Part-Time Cataloging Librarian Position

Due to a promotion, Elgin Community College Library has an immediate opening for a temporary (3-months with possibility of extension) part-time cataloger. The position is for 21 hours per week and is responsible for cataloging, classification and assignment of subject headings using OCLC and Dewey. This person will help with materials selection, may provide reference service back-up and library instruction.

There is an opportunity for an additional 90 grant-funded hours to work on a digitization project doing cataloging and metadata creation.

Minimum qualifications are a Master’s degree in Library Science and experience with OCLC. Innovative Interfaces and academic library experience are a plus. Minimum salary is $30 per hour.

Please send resume and letter indicating interest to:

Dr. Mi Hu
Dean, Academic Development and Learning Resources
Elgin Community College
1700 Spartan Drive
Elgin, IL 60123


Call for Papers: Chicago Digital Humanities Colloquium

Dear Friends,

The Call for Papers for the Chicago Digital Humanities/Computer Science Colloquium ( Nov 1st-3rd, 2008 ) has now been published on the Colloquium website (http://dhcs.uchicago.edu). On behalf of the organizing committee, I would like to encourage you to submit proposals for the 2008 DHCS and look forward to seeing you again in Chicago!

with best regards,

Arno Bosse
Senior Director of Technology
Division of the Humanities
University of Chicago
1115 E. 58th St., Walker Room 001B
Chicago, IL 60637
Phone: 773-702-6177
Fax: 773-834-5867

———–

Call for Papers: 2008 Chicago Digital Humanities/Computer Science Colloquium

Sponsored by the Humanities Division, the Computational Institute, NSIT Academic Technologies and the University Library at the University of Chicago, Northwestern University and the College of Science and Letters at the Illinois Institute of Technology.

DHCS Colloquium, November 1st – 3rd, 2008 Submission Deadline: August 31st, 2008

The goal of the annual Chicago Digital Humanities/Computer Science (DHCS) Colloquium is to bring together researchers and scholars in the Humanities and Computer Sciences to examine the current state of Digital Humanities as a field of intellectual inquiry and to identify and explore new directions and perspectives for future research. In 2006, the first DHCS Colloquium examined the challenges and opportunities posed by the “million books” digitization projects. The second DHCS Colloquium in 2007 focused on searching and querying as tools and methodologies.

The theme of the third Chicago DHCS Colloquium is “Making Sense”- an exploration of how meaning is created and apprehended at the transition of the digital and the analog.

We encourage submissions from scholars and researchers on all topics that intersect current theory and practice in the Humanities and Computer Science.

Website:

http://dhcs.uchicago.edu

Location:

The University of Chicago
Ida Noyes Hall
1212 East 59th Street
Chicago, IL 60637

Keynote Speakers:

Oren Etzioni is Director of the Turing Center and Professor of Computer Science at the University of Washington where his current research interests include fundamental problems in the study of artificial intelligence, web search, machine reading, and machine learning. Etzioni was the founder of Farecast, a company that utilizes data mining techniques to anticipate airfare fluctuations, and the KnowItAll project, which is is building domain-independent systems to extract information from the Web in an autonomous, scalable manner. Etzioni has published extensively in his field and served as an Associate Editor of the ACM Transactions on the Web and on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery, amongst others.

Stephen Downie is Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research interests include the design and evaluation of IR systems, including multimedia music information retrieval, the political economy of inter-networked communication systems, database design and web-based technologies. Downie is the principal investigator of the International Music Information Retrieval Systems Evaluation Laboratory (IMIRSEL), which is working on producing a large, secure corpus of audio and symbolic music data accessible to the music information retrieval (MIR) community.

Martin Wattenberg is a computer scientist and new media artist whose work focuses on the visual explorations of culturally significant data (http://www.bewitched.com). He is the founding manager of IBM’s Visual Communication Lab, which researches new forms of visualization and how they can enable better collaboration. The lab’s latest project is Many Eyes, an experiment in open, public data visualization and analysis. Wattenberg is also known for his visualization-based artwork, which has been exhibited in venues such as the London Institute of Contemporary Arts, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the New York Museum of Modern Art.

Program Committee:

* Shlomo Argamon, Computer Science Department, Illinois Institute of Technology * Helma Dik, Department of Classics, University of Chicago
* John Goldsmith, Department of Linguistics, Computer Science, Computation Institute, University of Chicago
* Catherine Mardikes, Bibliographer for Classics, the Ancient Near East, and General Humanities, University of Chicago Library
* Robert Morrissey, Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, Director of the ARTFL Project, University of Chicago
* Martin Mueller, Department of English and Classics, Northwestern University
* Mark Olsen, Associate Director of the ARTFL Project, University of Chicago
* Jason Salavon, Department of Visual Arts, Computation Institute, University of Chicago
* Kotoka Suzuki, Department of Music, Visual Arts, University of Chicago

Call for Participation:

Participation in the colloquium is open to all. We welcome submissions for:

* Paper presentations (20 minute maximum)
* Poster sessions
* Software demonstrations
* Performances

Suggested submission topics:

* Visualizing Large Data: Lessons from Industry & Big Science
* Computing Cinematic Syntax
* Linguistic and Literary Perspectives on Data Mining
* Social Scholarship / Socialized Search
* Agent Based Modelling
* Cartography and the Digital Traveler
* Serious Gaming
* Programming Algorithmic Art
* Statistical Analyses and Literary Meaning
* From a Maze of Twisty Passages: Future Interactive Fiction
* Representing Reading Time
* Hacking the Wiimote / Pwning the iPhone
* Polyglot Machines: Machine Translation
* The Subjectivity of Visualization
* Schemas for Scholars: Historicizing Machine Learning Ontologies
* Computational Stylistics
* Deconstructing Machine Learning
* The Library Catalog as Social Network: Library 2.0
* Mapping Social Relationships in the Novel
* Tagging Texts for Scholarly Practice
* Exploring Augmented Reality Systems

Submission Format:

Please submit a (2 page maximum) abstract in Adobe PDF (preferred) or MS Word format to dhcs-submissions@listhost.uchicago.edu.

Graduate Student Travel Fund:

A limited number of bursaries are available to assist graduate students who are presenting at the colloquium with their travel and accommodation expenses. No separate application form is required. Current graduate students whose proposals have been accepted for the colloquium will be contacted by the organizers with more details.

Important Dates:

Deadline for Submissions: Monday, August 31st
Notification of Acceptance: Monday, September 15th
Full Program Announcement: Monday, September 22nd
Registration: Monday, September 22nd – Friday, October 24th
Colloquium: Saturday, November 1st – Monday, November 3rd

Contact Info:

Please direct all inquiries to: dhcs-submissions@listhost.uchicago.edu

Organizing Committee:

* Arno Bosse, Senior Director for Technology, Humanities Division, University of Chicago.
* Helma Dik, Department of Classics, University of Chicago
* Catherine Mardikes, Bibliographer for Classics, the Ancient Near East, and General Humanities, University of Chicago Library.
* Mark Olsen, Associate Director, ARTFL Project, University of Chicago