Job Postings: Digitization Project Manager, Baruch College

Baruch College, a senior college of the City University of New York, is currently seeking applicants for a Digitization Project Manager position in its Archives and Special Collections Department. The Digitization Project Manager will assist with a year-long grant-funded project (July 1, 2015-June 30, 2016) to digitize and provide access to print materials in the Institute of Public Administration Collection. The Institute of Public Administration (IPA) was an educational and consulting organization with roots going back to 1906, whose aims were the creation of an efficient, honest and professional government.

The successful candidate will work in collaboration with the Digital Initiatives Librarian to create a work plan for the digitization project.  Duties include establishing, implementing, and documenting workflows for the capture and storage of digital objects; inputting metadata; training and supervising two scanning technicians and student workers; and providing quality control on scans.

Experience: supervisory role managing digital projects, working knowledge of metadata and archival description standards (DACS, EAD, MODS, METS, and Dublin Core); knowledge of best practices for preservation of, and access to, digital collections; and experience generating checksums.

Requirements: The successful candidate will have a Master’s in Library Science (MLS) or closely related discipline.  This position requires at least two years of experience working on digitization projects and managing workflows.

Full time, Temporary from July 1, 2015-June 30, 2016. Compensation: $50,000. Application Deadline: May 20, 2015. Please send resume/CV and letter of recommendation to Professor Jessica Wagner, Digital Initiatives Librarian at Baruch College, Jessica.Wagner@baruch.cuny.edu.

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Job Posts in Canada this week: Young Canada Works, part three

Museum Assistant – Research Intern, Langley Centennial Museum, Langely, BChttp://www.civicjobs.ca/101.asp?jobpostingid=26529&description=&provcode=BC&rid=&employer=&location=&pcid=82&searchby=yes&submit=+Go+#.VTEJ2PnF-Ig

As a student employee in the Recreation, Culture, and Parks Division of the Township of Langley, the incumbent will work on a short-term research project at the Langley Centennial Museum.  The project will be an investigation into the work of the Royal Engineers – Columbia Detachment 1858 to 1863 and their role in the settlement, development and security of the newly formed Colony of British Columbia and an investigation into the life and achievements of Sapper Philip Jackman – the last surviving member of the Columbia Detachment, community pioneer and former Reeve/Mayor of the Township of Langley.

The Incumbent will also work under the supervision of the Museum’s Curator in the areas of collections and exhibitions programs planning, development and execution to the benefit of the greater community and museum visitors.

Programming Assistant / Collections Assistant (Summer Student), Wetaskiwin & District Heritage Museum, Wetaskiwin, AB

http://www.rcip-chin.gc.ca/emplois-jobs/voir-view/detailler-detail-eng.app?id=3076&p_nav_perpage=10&p_nav_from=31

http://www.rcip-chin.gc.ca/emplois-jobs/voir-view/detailler-detail-eng.app?id=3075&p_nav_perpage=10&p_nav_from=31

The Collections Assistant will be an integral member of the Heritage Museum team through their support in the area of collections management. The summer student will work with our Collections Manager to improve collections procedures in the areas of storage, preservation, and expansion of information in the research files and collections database. The Collections Assistant will also have the opportunity to assist in other areas of museum operations including reception and programming.

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The Programming Assistant will be an integral member of the Heritage Museum team through their support with museum programs, events, and exhibits. Further, they will be given the opportunity to assist with the development, research, and presentation of several projects. The emphasis of this work will be their assistance with our “Women of Aspenland” program, which currently houses over 80 profiles of local women, and is the largest collection of its kind in Canada. For more on this project visit our website at http://www.wetasiwinmuseum.com. The Programming Assistant will also help with special events as well as tours, and have the opportunity to work in other areas of museum operations including reception, administration, and marketing.

Museum Programs Assistant, Philip J Currie Dinosaur Museum, Wembley, AB

http://curriemuseum1.staticmedia.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/SummerEducationStudent.pdf

Job Duties: • Participate in promotion of programs through on-line material, school visits and community events • Create and present age-appropriate programming for both the public and school age children • Conduct Bonebed tours • Assist with developing educational material for museum interpretative programs

Museum Assistant, Miles Canyon Historic Railway Society, Whitehorse, YT

http://www.yuwin.ca/Jobs/Posting?Id=7068

The Miles Canyon Historic Railway Society (MCHRS) runs a local, community museum, called the Copperbelt Railway & Mining Museum. The museum assistant will be responsible for the general operations of the Museum.

Program Assistant, Wallaceburg & District Museum, Wallaceburg, ON

http://www.rcip-chin.gc.ca/emplois-jobs/voir-view/detailler-detail-eng.app?id=3137&

The successful candidate will split the majority of their time between expanding the museum’s Newspaper Index and running our children’s Summer Camp. The student employee will be recording interesting stories and historical details into a computer database for future reference. The Summer Camp will run for three weeks during the course of the contract period. The camp’s programs have already been created; the participant will be responsible for delivering, advertising and further developing these programs. In addition, the student will be expected to design and implement one day’s worth of new programming.

Researcher and Cataloguer / Digitizer, Holocaust Memorial Museum, Montreal 

http://www.mhmc.ca/media_library/files/2015_CSJ_Agent%20de%20Catalogage_JG.pdf

http://www.mhmc.ca/media_library/files/2015_CSJ_Recherchiste%20FR.pdf 

Description des tâches et des responsabilités: – Numérisation des artefacts et des photos selon les normes de conservation; – Documentation des artefacts et des photos selon les lignes directrices établies; – Transfert des fichiers à un catalogue en ligne; – Assister la Coordonnatrice Musée avec les dons d’archives.

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Responsabilités principales : Documenter la thématique générale de l’exposition; Produire un rapport de recherche; Repérer les collections, archives et autres ressources pertinentes pour le développement des contenus de l’exposition; Effectuer des recherches iconographiques.

And a summer job without the YCW stipulations:

Collections Assistant (Museum of Zoology), University of Alberta, Edmonton

http://www.careers.ualberta.ca/Competition/S106626227/

 Museums and Collection Services, University of Alberta invites applications for a self-motivated and energetic Collections Assistant. Reporting to the Collections Management Advisor (Natural Sciences), the successful candidate will work in a team environment to assist with the reorganization and storage upgrade of the University of Alberta Museum of Zoology’s Mammalogy Collection.


Internship Opportunities: Multiple Positions, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, NY, NY

Internships available in digitization and records management.

https://archivesgig.wordpress.com/2015/04/09/new-york-ny-multiple-paid-internships-lincoln-center-for-the-performing-arts/


The Aura of Materiality: Digitization as Preservation

Guest Post by Jasmine Burns

When I started my MLIS degree in Spring 2014, it was immediately apparent that my research interests were much more theory-based than those of my colleagues. The practical nature of LIS can sometimes make it challenging for me to engage with my professors and peers in a meaningful way. For this reason, I was very excited when I was approached to write this post for ArLiSNAP, in which I will highlight some of the recent research and work that I have been conducting in the area of digitization and the digital surrogacy of visual materials. I whole-heartedly encourage any feedback and invite further conversations on the topics that are discussed here.

My research on this topic began with the thesis for my MA in Art History, which focused on the nature of digital surrogacy in relation to medieval manuscripts (a version of which was published in the most recent issue of Art Documentation). Here, I look into issues of materiality, virtuality, and the consequences of the digital reformatting of cultural heritage objects. This thesis was from the perspective of a researcher, rather than that of an Information Professional. Once I started my MLIS coursework, and the limitations of my arguments became clear, I started thinking about how issues of digital surrogacy translate to practical librarianship. This led me to start researching the topic of digitization as a method of preservation.

By Photo d'identité sans auteur, 1928 [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

By Photo d’identité sans auteur, 1928 [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

I decided to frame the argument around Walter Benjamin’s often-cited text “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction,” and limit the scope of the overall work to archival photographs in particular. Benjamin states that the aura of an object is tied to its unique existence in time and space, and that this is essentially lost in reproductions because it breaks the object from ritual. This argument is widely applied to technology and digital media (via Jean Baudrillard’s Simulacra and Simulation), especially in discussions of photographs. In utilizing this particular lens to discuss the question of whether or not digitization is a viable method of preservation, there are two popular outlooks: 1) as long as the content is fully captured then the photo is adequately preserved; or 2) photographs are three-dimensional objects and photographic meaning is derived not from content alone, but also from the material evidence of its manufacture and use (i.e. aura) and if those elements are lost through digitization, then the object is not fully preserved.

My work in Digital Collections allows me to confront these issues on both a practical and theoretical level. I entered this investigation fully convinced that digital reformatting could never preserve the full scope of material and visual information contained in photographs because of the elimination of the material vessel. Therefore, the digital surrogate was merely a placeholder, or a reference to the original, and had little to no value outside of its ability to disseminate photographic content. However, as I dove deeper into theories of reproduction and representation, I discovered that these notions of value are socially constructed and derive from the dichotomy of copy versus original that is so deeply ingrained into our society, particularly through museum culture. Such notions are exacerbated by our object-centered culture, whose focus is on tactility, tangibility, and originality as authenticity. By perpetuating these ideas, as well as the argument that a reproduction does not carry value outside of its connection to the original, we are limiting any potential uses and values of digital media.

Ultimately, I have ended up flipping Benjamin’s argument on itself in favor of digital surrogacy. Without the tangibility of a photograph, the lack of materiality becomes the defining feature of the surrogate. It sounds strange, but hear me out: instead of viewing the elimination of the material vessel as a limitation to the uses and value of a surrogate, the creation and dissemination of digital representations of physical photographs constructs a framework for preserving these very qualities. Through the surrogate’s inseparable relationship with the socially constructed centrality of the original, and its inherently material existence, the digital object is both referring to the original, and existing as a unique object to be valued, maintained, and used. Therefore, although the material elements of the photograph are “lost” during digitization, the surrogate itself takes the place of the aura, as the more a work is reproduced, the more significant it becomes. The best way I can describe this is through the Mona Lisa. How many times have you seen reproductions of the image of that mysterious woman? How many of you have seen the actual painting? Do you remember any of the paintings in the room with her? I certainly don’t. Because you have encountered the reproduction on such a large scale, the act of viewing the original painting is greatly enhanced, and almost ritualized. The material qualities are so apparent in this encounter that it hardly matters that you have studied its content hundreds of times before.

So, is it good to have a healthy dose of skepticism, and follow Jean Baudrillard’s idea that technology will only create a self-referential society, devoid of actual meaning? Or do we need to move forward and embrace new theories of digital cultural heritage that promote new contexts for understanding digital surrogates through connections with their physical counterparts? What are some of your thoughts or experiences with digital surrogates, either as a researcher or practitioner?


Job Post: Digital Archivist, Workman Arts Project of Ontario, Toronto

http://current.ischool.utoronto.ca/jobsite/2015/digital-archivist

Workman Arts Project of Ontario (Workman Arts) facilitates aspiring, emerging and established artists with mental illness and addiction issues to develop and refine their art form through its arts training programs, public performance/exhibition opportunities and partnering with other arts organizations. As well, Workman Arts promotes a greater understanding of mental illness and addiction through the creation, presentation and discussion of artistic media in five disciplines: music, theatre, literature, visual art and media art.
Founded in 1987 as a theatre company of eight members (individuals with mental illness and limited arts training), over the past 27 years Workman Arts has evolved into a multi-disciplinary professional arts organization engaging over 300 member artists, at various stages of developing their practice. Through an increasingly entrepreneurial approach, Workman has empowered and collaborated with thousands of artists with mental health and addiction issues who have performed or exhibited to audiences in prestigious venues nationally and internationally.
Workman Arts is currently in the process of consolidating its body of knowledge and developing a theoretical framework that will allow the organization to evolve from a practice-based service provider to an evidence-based leader and change agent.

Reporting to the Project Manager and working with a small group of interns, the Digital Archivist will be responsible to develop and direct the documentation process, structure and tools required for a Workman Arts Digital Archives.
Responsibilities:
• Review issues of consistency, format, standardization and metadata in the beginning of the process;
• Create preservation indicators (Establish DA inclusion criteria, and process);
• Assess long term value of the information;
• Develop a collection policy that includes what to archive , determining extent to archiving links and refreshing site contents;
• Develop a plan for changes to access mechanism, rights management and security;
• Train Interns on system, collection policy, software and process to review, tag, scan and catalogue;
• Monitor interns progress regularly and provides ongoing direction as required;
• Develop user friendly guide on how to use the Digital Archives system and provides training to Project Coordinator and WA staff; Interns
• Develop a collection policy that includes what to archive, determining extent, archiving links and refreshing site contents

Two year part-time consulting contract. Total compensation $15,000

Apply by email:

Info@workmanarts.com

Application deadline:

Feb 2 2015

How to apply:

Send your application to: info@workmanarts.com
Please quote Application for Digital Archivist in the subject line and submit the following:
• Cover letter stating why you are interested in this position
• Current CV
Note: Only applicants selected for an interview will be contacted. Interviews to be held February 9 – 13, 2015
We will not accept emails or telephone inquires regarding this position.
Workman Arts is an equal opportunity employer.


Job Posting: Collections Cataloguer, Princeton Art Museum

The Princeton University Art Museum (PUAM) is seeking a museum professional to help us digitize and catalog the approximately 5,200 Master Set gelatin silver prints within the Minor White Archive. The ideal candidate will rise to the challenges surrounding the direct capture of photographs and the subsequent cataloging of complex material. This is a wonderful opportunity for those with an interest in 20th century photography to immerse themselves in the creative process of a single artist, and to play a significant role in making a collection widely accessible for the first time.

This work is related to a recently awarded IMLS grant. This position is funded as a full-time, one year term (start date as soon as possible) but is also open to folks who may prefer to commute to Princeton on a part-time basis over a longer term, extending through the end of the grant period (October 2016). Experience with tethered capture, studio lighting & balancing, proofing, metadata, digital image processing, cataloging tombstone & inscription elements needed. The position will work closely with both Photography/Visual Resources and Collections Information staff in the Museum throughout the project.

Please apply online via the Princeton jobs website<https://jobs.princeton.edu/applicants/jsp/shared/Welcome_css.jsp>, Requisition Number #1400835, position title Collections Cataloger.


Job Posting: Cataloguing and Digitization Archivist, Stratford Festival Theatre, ON

(via the ARCAN-L listserv; no link!)

Would you like to play a meaningful role with North America’s leading classical repertory theatre? At the Stratford Festival, we attract the world’s finest talent, offering a unique experience for staff, artists, and actors alike. If you would like to be a part of this exciting organization, we are looking for someone to fill the role of….

Cataloguing and Digitization Archivist

This full time position will report to the Director of Archives and will divide their time equally between two major areas of responsibilities;

• Digitization of archive content for the purposes of a) preservation, b) reuse by the Festival in the context of marketing, production support, etc; and c) research by external researchers.

• Surveying, accessioning and cataloguing of material in the Archive to improve the management and exploitation of the collections

Main tasks will be as follows:

• Copyright and rights investigation and documentation

• Digitization pre-processing work

• Digitization of collections (incl photographic preservation and creation of catalogue entries for object access) according to guidelines

• Active input to the development of the above processes

• Surveying of material currently in the Archive and retrospective accessioning of this material

• Accessioning of new material that enters into the Archives

• Cataloguing materials to relevant standards as prioritized by the Director of Archives and creation of authority records

You must hold a professional archives qualification and have practical experience of working in a busy archive department. Experience of cataloguing, digitization and use of software such as Adobe PhotoShop is required. Familiarity with Canadian copyright and information law in an archival setting is also necessary; knowledge of theatre and experience working in a theatre environment would be an asset.

We recognize that diversity – in our workplace, in our audiences and on our stages fosters a rich and creative environment. We are actively engaged in building a more diverse workplace and encourage all qualified applicants to apply by December 5, 2014 to;

Human Resources

Stratford Festival

E-mail: resumes@stratfordfestival.ca