The Aura of Materiality: Digitization as Preservation

Guest Post by Jasmine Burns

When I started my MLIS degree in Spring 2014, it was immediately apparent that my research interests were much more theory-based than those of my colleagues. The practical nature of LIS can sometimes make it challenging for me to engage with my professors and peers in a meaningful way. For this reason, I was very excited when I was approached to write this post for ArLiSNAP, in which I will highlight some of the recent research and work that I have been conducting in the area of digitization and the digital surrogacy of visual materials. I whole-heartedly encourage any feedback and invite further conversations on the topics that are discussed here.

My research on this topic began with the thesis for my MA in Art History, which focused on the nature of digital surrogacy in relation to medieval manuscripts (a version of which was published in the most recent issue of Art Documentation). Here, I look into issues of materiality, virtuality, and the consequences of the digital reformatting of cultural heritage objects. This thesis was from the perspective of a researcher, rather than that of an Information Professional. Once I started my MLIS coursework, and the limitations of my arguments became clear, I started thinking about how issues of digital surrogacy translate to practical librarianship. This led me to start researching the topic of digitization as a method of preservation.

By Photo d'identité sans auteur, 1928 [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

By Photo d’identité sans auteur, 1928 [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

I decided to frame the argument around Walter Benjamin’s often-cited text “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction,” and limit the scope of the overall work to archival photographs in particular. Benjamin states that the aura of an object is tied to its unique existence in time and space, and that this is essentially lost in reproductions because it breaks the object from ritual. This argument is widely applied to technology and digital media (via Jean Baudrillard’s Simulacra and Simulation), especially in discussions of photographs. In utilizing this particular lens to discuss the question of whether or not digitization is a viable method of preservation, there are two popular outlooks: 1) as long as the content is fully captured then the photo is adequately preserved; or 2) photographs are three-dimensional objects and photographic meaning is derived not from content alone, but also from the material evidence of its manufacture and use (i.e. aura) and if those elements are lost through digitization, then the object is not fully preserved.

My work in Digital Collections allows me to confront these issues on both a practical and theoretical level. I entered this investigation fully convinced that digital reformatting could never preserve the full scope of material and visual information contained in photographs because of the elimination of the material vessel. Therefore, the digital surrogate was merely a placeholder, or a reference to the original, and had little to no value outside of its ability to disseminate photographic content. However, as I dove deeper into theories of reproduction and representation, I discovered that these notions of value are socially constructed and derive from the dichotomy of copy versus original that is so deeply ingrained into our society, particularly through museum culture. Such notions are exacerbated by our object-centered culture, whose focus is on tactility, tangibility, and originality as authenticity. By perpetuating these ideas, as well as the argument that a reproduction does not carry value outside of its connection to the original, we are limiting any potential uses and values of digital media.

Ultimately, I have ended up flipping Benjamin’s argument on itself in favor of digital surrogacy. Without the tangibility of a photograph, the lack of materiality becomes the defining feature of the surrogate. It sounds strange, but hear me out: instead of viewing the elimination of the material vessel as a limitation to the uses and value of a surrogate, the creation and dissemination of digital representations of physical photographs constructs a framework for preserving these very qualities. Through the surrogate’s inseparable relationship with the socially constructed centrality of the original, and its inherently material existence, the digital object is both referring to the original, and existing as a unique object to be valued, maintained, and used. Therefore, although the material elements of the photograph are “lost” during digitization, the surrogate itself takes the place of the aura, as the more a work is reproduced, the more significant it becomes. The best way I can describe this is through the Mona Lisa. How many times have you seen reproductions of the image of that mysterious woman? How many of you have seen the actual painting? Do you remember any of the paintings in the room with her? I certainly don’t. Because you have encountered the reproduction on such a large scale, the act of viewing the original painting is greatly enhanced, and almost ritualized. The material qualities are so apparent in this encounter that it hardly matters that you have studied its content hundreds of times before.

So, is it good to have a healthy dose of skepticism, and follow Jean Baudrillard’s idea that technology will only create a self-referential society, devoid of actual meaning? Or do we need to move forward and embrace new theories of digital cultural heritage that promote new contexts for understanding digital surrogates through connections with their physical counterparts? What are some of your thoughts or experiences with digital surrogates, either as a researcher or practitioner?

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Job Posting: Film Technician, Colorlab, Rockville, MD

Description:  Film Technician for Motion Picture Preservation Film Facility

The Role:

We are currently seeking individuals to join our Film Preparation Department (prep).  As a key member of prep, you will be exposed to processes and techniques used to work with a variety of film formats.  Previous film handling experience is beneficial but our training results in a knowledgeable Preservation Film Technician.  A successful candidate will demonstrate strong attention to detail, organizational and time management skills, and an ability to communicate effectively.

Key Responsibilities:

  • Assess condition of material to determine best preservation workflow
  • Maintain data log of work procedure and material condition
  • Conduct the physical preparation, repair, and cleaning of client material in step for next phase
  • Follow industry conventions and client requirements for proper labeling and identification of material
  • Coordinate with staff to facilitate transition of jobs through different departments
  • Manage and respond to inbound requests regarding job status and condition
  • Assist with shipping and receiving of client material on as needed basis

Successful candidates will possess:

  • Strong attention to detail
  • Excellent written and oral communication skills
  • Exceptional organizing, multitasking, and prioritization skills
  • Effective time management and ability to work well under pressure
  • Advanced computer skills using data spreadsheets and internet research
  • Ability to learn technique and information quickly
  • Ability to work independently with minimal supervision.
  • Experience handling 16mm and 35mm motion picture film, splicing, perforation repair, and printing procedures a plus.

Colorlab offers a full compensation package that includes:

  • A selection of health and dental benefits, health savings plan, paid time off and 401(K) option

Colorlab is a well-respected motion picture facility in Rockville, Maryland, that handles original camera negative and archival films. Our clients include Federal, state, and municipal government institutions, universities, museums, production companies, and individuals.

Applicants should e-mail a one-page resume and cover letter to info@colorlab.com.

Dean Plionis

colorlab

Marketing and Customer Service

5708 Arundel Ave.

Rockville, MD 20852

Phone: 301-770-2128 x133

Fax: 301-816-0798

deanp@colorlab.com


Interview: Starting a Student Chapter

We’ve talked before about the value of having professional-association student chapters on campus, whether it’s just general awareness of career options and extracurriculars or the impact on your resume of helping to manage and plan events, fundraisers, field trips, etc. There are no ARLIS/NA student chapters (yet), but that doesn’t mean you can’t start one! (I guess ArLiSNAP is sort of your virtual student chapter.)

During my MLIS these past two years, I watched some fellow McGill students start up a student chapter of the Association of Moving Image Archivists. As media preservation is a pretty important topic to arts-librarianship students, I thought I would ask a few questions about the process, the need, and the benefits of bringing special-interest representation to your school. Justin Mckinney kindly agreed to answer my questions about his work founding the chapter.

(Photos by Fiona Mak.)

Film handling workshop with George Eastman House

Film handling workshop with George Eastman House

George Eastman Film Handling Workshop

George Eastman Film Handling Workshop

ArLiSNAP: Let’s start with student chapters generally – were you members of other student chapters to start?

Justin Mckinney: During my first year of library school, I was a member of the Association of Canadian Archivists student chapter at McGill. I started out keen and not knowing what I was doing and imagining all the great things we would accomplish, but nothing really happened all year and I wasn’t exactly as active as I could have been.

ArLiSNAP: What’s the value of having local representation of professional associations?

JM: I think it has the potential to help raise awareness about the organization. Also, it can educate student members about issues in the field and maybe even lead to practical opportunities to do stuff. I think it probably varies from year to year and association to association, and is really dependent on the group of people involved at any given time.

ArLiSNAP: Why the Association of Moving Image Archivists specifically?

JM: I became really interested in film history and film preservation after my undergrad, which led me down the path to library school. I was already an AMIA member before starting library school, and my main interest in the archivy/LIS world was and is film preservation. After a sort of underwhelming experience of my first year at library school (which included a complete absence of film archiving content), I was determined to take more of an active role in my own learning. Fortunately, I had a couple of great friends in the program who had similar interests and were very supportive, and it snowballed from there.

ArLiSNAP: What was the process for starting a student chapter?

JM: I started emailing (and harassing) the fine people at AMIA about how to start a student chapter and they explained what was needed, which was mainly a constitution and that the executive members all be members of AMIA. They put me in touch with the folks at the NYU AMIA student chapter, and they were kind enough to send me their constitution, which I basically amended to change any mention of NYU to McGill — from there, we were off and running.

As for McGill, I just emailed people at the School of Information Studies (SIS) and let them know what I was doing and they got us a table at the student chapter fair at the start of the school year. Throughout the year they were generally helpful about any questions I had and they also helped us get connected with the Masters of Library and Information Science Student Association (MLISSA), and the Post-Graduate Student Society (PGSS), which both provide funding for SIS student groups.

In general, though, it was mostly a lot of me emailing and badgering people and then getting information as needed. It’s not really a clear process to setting up a chapter, and I think it would be beneficial if there were more guidance or upfront information given about the process of starting one.

In regards to gauging student interest, we really had no idea what would happen. To start it was just the executive (myself, Mark Haydn as vice-president, and Nicholas Avedisian-Cohen as secretary and treasurer). My main goal was to make the student chapter viable enough for someone to take over for a second year, once we all graduated. At the aforementioned student chapter fair, we were pleasantly surprised to get over 20 students to sign up for our email list, and we held our first meeting, which had over ten people, including first- and second-year students. This was a pleasant surprise and I think demonstrated that many people are interested in the field and also frustrated with the lack of film/media archiving content in library school.

The main paperwork was getting the constitution ratified. We also had to apply for funding for various events through PGSS and MLISSA. A lot it was just learning on the fly, as none of us had ever done anything like this before. So it involved a lot of asking questions of people at McGill and AMIA, and remaining persistent.

Probably the biggest challenge was forging a relationship with the Moving Image Research Laboratory (MIRL) at McGill, a research project which houses a wonderful cinema space and collection of 16mm films. Pretty much all of the Fall 2013 semester was spent sending emails, stalking professors, and showing up unannounced, just trying to get our foot in the door. Finally in January, we got access and that proved to be our greatest success, as it allowed us to start handling film, cataloguing the collection, and providing real hands-on experience in the field.

ArLiSNAP: You also organized a one-day symposium, which brought in guest speakers and gave students a chance to present their research. Why did you choose a symposium as your first event? How did that organizational process work?

JM: Technically, our first event was a field trip to the National Preservation Centre at Library and Archives Canada in Gatineau. We had 20 people come along and we got a great tour of the facilities there, and met a bunch of professionals in the field. Mark Haydn and I also attended the AMIA Conference in 2013 and met a bunch of the students at the Eastman House in Rochester, NY. Thanks to these friendships, we were able to organize a trip down there as well, where we got to tour their facilities and participate in a film-handling workshop.

As for the symposium, I heard that all the other groups were doing one, so we just copied them. The process of organizing it wasn’t that difficult. We booked the space at SIS and just sent out a call for papers and presentations to members of our email list. I also contacted David Stevenson, the conservator at the Canadian Centre of Architecture, whom I met on a class field trip, about presenting. I also contacted Phil Spurrell, the proprietor of CineClub Film Society, who I’ve known for several years and volunteered with. He is very knowledgeable about the medium of film and had a lot of interesting experiences working with film.

ArLiSNAP: Have you found someone to hand off the reins to? Do you have any thoughts on the sustainability of the group, long-term?

JM: One of the really encouraging things about our membership was that we had a lot of first-year students who were incredibly eager and motivated. So by the time we started cataloguing the MIRL collection, we were regularly getting 15 to 20 people out to volunteer. So we knew we had a solid base of people who might be able to take over next year. From there, we asked for nominations and were able to come up with a four-person executive committee for another year.

My hope is that some of the connections we made with the folks at LAC, and the folks at Eastman House, will continue and allow for more educational opportunities and networking. Also, the MIRL collection is really outstanding and needs a lot of work to catalogue, plus the cinema space allows for screenings and projections of the collection. This hands-on practical experience is invaluable and I think should be a major factor in the success of the group long-term.

ArLiSNAP: Do you have any ideas or recommendations about how to improve LIS curricula to contain more of the useful things your AMIA chapter is trying to do? Or do you think it’s better off as extracurricular activity?

JM: I feel like the major deficit of the MLIS program is the lack of hands-on experience of working with materials regardless of type. Particularly in the archival end of things, where the theoretical felt very abstract and weird to me. I found my understanding only started to come together through some of the volunteering I was doing at the Jewish Public Library Archives, where I was handling documents, creating finding aids, and writing accession numbers on folders.

Obviously, because of the broad focus of the program, it would be hard to have a dedicated film archiving course, but it is certainly something that could be touched on. Maybe a course dealing directly with the preservation of objects, rather than the theoretical preservation of objects would be useful.

Unfortunately, I think everything is becoming so focused on digital objects and becoming “information specialists” to the detriment of acquiring actual tangible physical skills, which I fear is leaving a lot of graduates ill-equipped to manage the physical aspects of library and archive work. Maybe it’s for the better, as having a broader and more transferable set of skills could help grads deal with the job market, but I can’t help thinking something valuable is being lost in the transition.

AMIA Montreal Meets AMIA Rochester

AMIA Montreal Meets AMIA Rochester in New York

We’d love to hear about your experiences with professional associations, and if you’re thinking about starting a student chapter at your school (ARLIS/NA or otherwise). It’s not too late to plan something for the coming school year. Let us know in the comments!


Educational opportunities- free webinar & more!

Remember, for ongoing opportunities and deadlines please visit the Educational Opportunities Calendar.

Free Webinar: Developing Your Plan for Successful Career Growth and Advancement

Presenters: Deb Hunt and David Grossman

Format: Webinar

Date: Tuesday, August 14, 2012

Start Time: 12 Noon Pacific
1PM Mountain
2PM Central
3PM Eastern

This webinar will last approximately one hour. Webinars are free of charge. Registration is ONLY done on the day of the event on the WebEx server starting 30 minutes before the start of the webinar. No Passwords are required. For Tips and Registration Information, please go to http://infopeople.org/training/webcasts/tips.html

For more information and to participate in the Tuesday, August 14, 2012 webinar, go to http://infopeople.org/training/developing-your-plan

The first webinar in this series focused broadly on skills that are needed in the contemporary library environment, and where to find training in those skills. This webinar will focus on your individual skills and skill gaps. Determining the specific combination of skills you need to acquire in order to advance your career or take it in a different direction can be a daunting challenge.

How can you:
Determine which skills are essential for pursuing your chosen career path?
Craft a plan to acquire the critical skills that may be lacking or increase your level of competency for skills you already possess?
Acquire the new skills necessary for career advancement if you are unable to attain those them within the confines of your current job?
Successfully break through these barriers and smooth the way to career growth and expansion?
Design and create a resume that will rise to the top of the pile and maximize you chances of landing your dream job?
In this one-hour webinar, participants will learn a number of proven strategies to acquire new skills and be shown how to formulate a plan to attain those new skills or bolster the skills they already possess. They also learn how to successfully overcome some of the greatest barriers to career growth. Finally, they learn how to redesign their resumes to garner maximum impact.
At the end of this one-hour webinar, participants will:
Be able to generate a customized list of the skills they need and levels of expertise they must attain in order to move their careers forward and meet their career objectives.
Be able to conceptualize and prioritize their skill acquisition strategies to meet their career objectives.
Be able to create a customized plan for the acquisition of new skills or improvement of existing skills to meet their career objectives.
Learn how to overcome the five biggest obstacles for career advancement
Know how to rewrite their resume to stand out from the crowd and maximize their chances of success.
This webinar will be of interest to Library staff contemplating the next job opportunity or career change and those seeking to identify their current skills and acquiring new ones.
This is part of a series of four webinars. The other presentations can found at:
Webinar 1: Identifying and Acquiring New Skills: The Key to Career Growth and Advancement July 10, 2012
Webinar 2: Developing Your Plan for Successful Career Growth and Advancement August 14, 2012
Webinar 3: Successful Librarians Share Their Stories of Career Growth and Advancement Coming in September 2012
Webinar 4: Telling Your Story: Five Secrets for Successful Career Growth and Advancement Coming in October 2012
If you are unable to attend the live event, you can access the archived version the day following the webinar. Check our archive listing at: http://infopeople.org/training/view/webinar/archived

Submit reports for “E-Resources Round Up” column 

If you attended ALA Annual or other professional conferences this summer, you are invited to submit reports for programs dealing with electronic resources in libraries to the “E-Resources Round Up” column for volume 24, number 4 of the Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship (JERL).

The “E-Resource Round Up” column is dedicated to helping JERL readers better understand topics related to the ever-changing world of electronic resources and their roles in libraries. It covers developments in the areas of new and emerging technologies and systems related to electronic resources and the digital environment; reports from professional discussion groups, meetings, presentations, and conferences; news and trends related to electronic resource librarianship; tips and suggestions on various aspects of working with electronic resources; opinion pieces; vendor activities; and upcoming events of potential interest to JERL readers.

Your contribution to the column does not have to be lengthy, and could be on any of the topics listed above. This could be an ideal opportunity for you to report on sessions you attended that may benefit others in our profession. If you are interested in submitting a program report, please check with the presenters first to make sure they are not planning to write their own version for publication.

The editors would like to receive contributions to the column by Friday, August 17, 2012.

If you have a submission or questions, please contact the column editors:

Bob Wolverton
Mississippi State University Libraries
(662) 325-4618
bwolverton[at]library[dot]msstate[dot]edu

Karen Davidson
Mississippi State University Libraries
(662) 325-3018
kdavidson[at]library[dot]msstate[dot]edu

ALCTS Web Course: Fundamentals of Preservation
Session: September 10 – October 5, 2012

Four-week online course that introduces participants to the principles, policies and practices of preservation in libraries and archives. It is designed to inform all staff, across divisions and departments and at all levels of responsibility. Provides tools to begin extending the useful life of library collections.

Course components:
Preservation as a formal library function, and how it reflects and supports the institutional mission
The primary role of preventive care, including good storage conditions, emergency planning, and careful handling of collections
The history and manufacture of physical formats and how this impacts on preservation options
Standard methods of care and repair, as well as reformatting options
Challenges in preserving digital content and what the implications are for the future of scholarship
This course is one-third of the Collection Management Elective course approved by the Library Support Staff Certification Program (LSSCP).

Registration Fees: $109 ALCTS Member and $129 Non-member

For additional details, registration, and contact information please see: http://www.ala.org/alcts/conf! events/upcoming/webcourse/fpres/ol_templ

For questions about registration, contact ALA Registration by calling 1-800-545-2433 and press 5 or email registration[at]ala[dot]org. For all other questions or comments related to the web courses, cont! act Julie Reese, ALCTS Events Manager at 1-800-545-2433, ext.! 5034 or alctsce[at]ala[dot]org.
To view this Event in Connect, go to http://connect.ala.org/node/184047

CALL FOR PARTICIPATION: Remaking Research: Emerging Research Practices in Art and Design

Remaking Research: Emerging Research Practices in Art and Design invites artists, designers and educators to submit proposals for Featured Research Projects to be presented at the symposium.
Remaking Research is an AICAD ‘working symposium’ centred on the discourse, pragmatics and possibilities of creative practice as research, both within art and design institutions and in the context of interdisciplinary, inter-institutional, and partnered relations taking place at Emily Carr University of Art + Design in Vancouver, Canada from November 1-3, 2012.

We are currently accepting proposals to present research projects that address the Remaking Research Symposium themes:
The Production of Knowledge in Art and Design
The Political Economies of Art and Design Research
Networked and Partnered Research Practice
The ten-minute Featured Research Projects presentations are an opportunity to share a project or collaboration.
To submit a proposal to present a Featured Research Project, please send the following information to remaking[at]ecuad[dot]ca:
your name and institution
a short description of your project (300- 500 words)
no more than 5 images (jpeg or pdf)
an indication of the theme to which your project responds
DEADLINE: Thursday, September 20, 2012
SUBMIT TO: remaking[at]ecuad[dot]ca
PLEASE NOTE: Remaking Research is not able to support travel or conference fees for those presenting Featured Research Projects. We are happy, however, to support your participation by providing a letter confirming your contribution.


Call for Submissions: Archiving the Arts symposium

The Association of Moving Image Archivists Student Chapter at New York University and Independent Media Arts Preservation invite submissions for…

Archiving the Arts: addressing preservation in the creative process.

This symposium will explore the relationship between media artists and audiovisual archivists. Archiving the Arts allows for a dialogue that can enhance mutual understanding between both constituencies. By exposing these communities to best practices, working methods, and the technological and industrial realities faced by members of each group, we hope to foster a discussion, improve the current conditions, and widen awareness of preventative preservation for the long term.

The combined problems of born-digital works and media obsolescence intensify the urgency of preemptive preservation practices. Film and video archivists know all too well the risks media artworks face. At the same time, artists face the same concerns—not just with completed works, with the raw materials of film, video, audio, digital objects—that are essential to their ongoing creative process. But often these two groups lack a common language and a way for their communities to interact and develop tools that serve all parties. Archivists don’t necessarily understand the creative process. Artists don’t always think about their work in terms of its preservation.

Archiving the Arts promotes dialogue between working professionals, artists, students, and other interested parties whose goal is to prevent avoidable loss of creative works by integrating preservation strategies into moving image creation and production.

The day-long symposium of panels, screenings, and workshops will tackle the practical, theoretical, and technical issues that affect the artist and the archivist. Working across disciplines will result in a dynamic conversation and create a deeper understanding of the importance of preventative preservation.

Please see the Call for Papers below and join us on October 13th, 2012 during Archives Week in New York City.

 www.imappreserve.org                         www.AMIAstudentsNYC.com

 ______

CALL FOR PAPERS — ARCHIVING THE ARTS 

The AMIA (Association of Moving Image Archivists) Student Chapter at New York University invites presentation proposals forArchiving the Arts, to be held jointly with IMAP (Independent Media Arts Preservation) in New York City on Saturday, October 13th, 2012 as part of Archives Week organized by Archivists Roundtable of New York – www.nycarchivists.org.

Please submit a 250-word proposal to Kathryn Gronsbell at NYU.AMIA@gmail.com

Priority will be given to submissions received by Friday, May 4, 2012.

Papers, presentations, workshops, and posters are welcome on all issues concerning artists and audiovisual archivist. Possible topics include:

Preventative Preservation

How do we integrate preservation strategies into creation? What are the benefits? What are the disadvantages?

Technically Speaking – creating & ingesting born-digital objects

What are the technical issues/specs regarding metadata crawling, signal problems, and the application of preventative preservation in production?

Temporal Art

How does ephemeral art act as a counterargument to preservation? How do conservators work with artists who wish to intentionally destroy or abandon their own work?  How do artists who restrict their work to a single format exist for posterity?

From the Studio to the Archive

How do artists’ intentions affect collection development? Archive policies and practices?

Growing an “Organic” Archive

“Organic” archives are repositories that develop from the intentions and desires of the contributing artist(s). How are artists and archivists working (or not working) together to create this type of archival system? What is known about existing “Organic” archives and what methods can be used to expand their potential?

Put Your Best Fail Forward

Share your unique collection/archival challenges that were not resolved, and why. Artists – what attempts have you made to ensure the welfare of your work? What is the disconnect between theory and practice?


Job Posting: Project Archivist at Columbia University Libraries, Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library

Columbia University Libraries, Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library – Project Archivist

(posted November 14, 2011)
The Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library is searching for an experienced archivist to process the architectural drawings and personal papers of the New York architect Edgar Tafel. This position will be funded for 12 months with the possibility of extension. Funding for the position will begin on the selectee’s start date. The collection covers the architectural projects of Tafel’s career as well as personal papers and writings, especially his research and writing on Frank Lloyd Wright.

Working under the supervision of the Curator of Drawing and Archives, the Project Archivist will be responsible for:

-Processing of architectural drawings, files, and photography of Tafel’s career. Includes sorting and appraising materials for possible reduction of collection. Includes preparing materials for transport and storage to offsite facility.

-Processing of papers and other files relating to Tafel’s role as historian of Frank Lloyd Wright and related Wright
collections. Includes sorting and appraising materials for possible reduction of collection.
-Arranging and describing architectural collections in an electronic database following DACS and other emerging standards. Includes searching, authority work, description & subject analysis.
-Assigning, revising, and training students and graduate interns to provide assistance with tasks above, including inputting, processing, and research in archival files. The position will also be responsible for other duties as assigned.

Requirements are: ALA accredited M.L.S. with formal course work in archives administration or an M.A. in archival management, and two years related experience, or an equivalent combination of education and experience. The incumbent must have thorough knowledge of archival processing and preservation theories and procedure; ability to work effectively, both independently and as a member or a team; ability to combine accuracy and efficiency; proven organizational and supervisory skills; proven interpersonal skills. Must be able to lift and carry heavy boxes and must be able to climb ladders. Knowledge of American architecture, historic preservation, urban planning or design history, especially relating to Frank Lloyd Wright, highly desirable.

This position has been classified as a PC I position.

Applications will be accepted immediately and until the position is filled, for immediate consideration please apply online at:

https://academicjobs.columbia.edu/applicants/Central?quickFind=55601

Application deadline: December 12, 2011
The Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library is one of the most comprehensive architecture and fine arts library collections in the world. Avery collects a full range of primary and secondary sources for the advanced study of architecture, historic preservation, art history, decorative arts, city planning, real estate, and archaeology. The Library contains 500,000 volumes including 40,000 rare books, and receives approximately 1,900 periodicals. Avery’s Drawings and Archives collection includes 1.5 million architectural drawings and records.

The Avery Library is home to the Avery Index to Architectural Periodicals, the only comprehensive American guide to the current literature of architecture and design.

The Avery Index to Architectural Periodicals offers broad coverage of journal articles published worldwide on architecture and design, archaeology, city planning, interior design, landscape architecture, and historic preservation. With more than 675,000 records, the Index continues to be the pre-eminent discovery resource for research in architecture and related fields.
Columbia University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer. Minorities and women are encouraged to apply.

Out of the Ordinary: Preserving Paper-Based Ephemera Symposium

OUT OF THE ORDINARY: PRESERVING PAPER-BASED EPHEMERA  
Presented by the Conservation Center for Art & Historic Artifacts
June 17, 2011
Baltimore, MD

Co-sponsored & hosted by:
Johns Hopkins University, Sheridan Libraries, Department of Conservation & Preservation at The George Peabody Library

ABOUT THE PROGRAM

This symposium will examine the myriad of challenges faced in preserving a wide variety of non-standard paper items produced in the 19th and 20th centuries, including paper dolls, greeting cards, posters, maps, blueprints, baseball cards, miniature books, scrapbooks, and oversize objects such as posters, maps, and blueprints .  The size, the use of mixed media, and the often-transient nature of these objects add to the complexity of their preservation needs.  The symposium will address the need to retain basic preservation guidelines while creatively developing effective storage, handling, and exhibition strategies and solutions for a variety of items.

This program is intended for curators, librarians, archivists, collection managers, and others involved in the care of collections that include paper-based objects large and small.

SPEAKERS INCLUDE

Barbara Fahs Charles, Principal, Staples & Charles
Joan Irving, Paper Conservator and Adjunct Assistant Professor, University of Delaware
Corine Norman McHugh, Paper Conservator, Conservation Center for Art & Historic Artifacts
Debra Hess Norris, Chairperson and Professor of Photograph Conservation, Art Conservation Department, University of Delaware

Information about our speakers, host, and cosponsors is available at: www.ccaha.org/education/program-calendar

LOCATION & TIMES

The George Peabody Library
17 East Mt. Vernon Place
Baltimore, Maryland 21202

Friday, June 17, 2011
8:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Registration & refreshments
9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Program

NOTES

* Lunch will not be provided. However, a list of local restaurants will be available.
* Refunds will be given until two weeks prior to program date, minus a $25 cancellation fee.
* If you have special needs, please contact CCAHA three weeks prior to the workshop date so that accommodations can be made.

REGISTRATION & FEES 

$95  CCAHA members
$110 Non-members

Registration Deadline: June 3, 2011

Registration, secure credit card payment, and additional program information are available on our website at:  www.ccaha.org/education/program-calendar

The Academy of Certified Archivists will award five Accreditation Recertification Credits (ARCs) to eligible Certified Archivists (CAs) attending this program. For more information, go to: www.certifiedarchivists.org.

Major funding for this program was generously provided by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

To learn more about CCAHA and its programs and services, please visit our website at www.ccaha.org.

QUESTIONS?  Call 215-545-0613 or email pso@ccaha.org