Our Virtual Conference Recordings Are Now Available!

webinar_400x250The recordings from our virtual conference are now available via the ARLIS/NA Learning Portal! These recordings are freely available to all.

Click here for all recordings!

Part One: Keynote Address and Student & New Professional Presentations

e.lane

Keynote Speaker, Elizabeth Lane

Student and New Professional Speakers: Kathryn Thornhill, Morgan McKeehan, Abigail Sadler, and Hannah Marshall

Student and New Professional Speakers: Kathryn Thornhill, Morgan McKeehan, Abigail Sadler, and Hannah Marshall

Part Two: New Initiatives in Art Archives

Panel Discussion featuring: Kristie MacDonald, founder of Archiving Art Imogen Smith, Project Manager at the Dance Heritage Coalition Caitlin Harrington and Seth Persons, students at Pratt Institute and NYARC Project members

Panel Discussion featuring:
Kristie MacDonald, founder of Archiving Art
Imogen Smith, Project Manager at the Dance Heritage Coalition
Caitlin Harrington and Seth Persons, students at Pratt Institute and NYARC Project members

Part Three: Student & New Professional Presentations

Nicole Lovenjak, Country Baron, Alexandra Kadlec, and Amber Welch

Nicole Lovenjak, Country Baron, Alexandra Kadlec, and Amber Welch

Part Four: Advice Roundtable

Suzanne Rackover, Managing Librarian, Paul D. Fleck Library & Archives, The Banff Centre Ashley Peterson, Librarian, School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston Molly Schoen, Information Resources/Technical Specialist, Visual Resources Collection, University of Michigan Amanda Meeks, Reference and Instruction Librarian, Savannah College of Art and Design ACA Library, Atlanta

Suzanne Rackover, Managing Librarian, Paul D. Fleck Library & Archives, The Banff Centre
Ashley Peterson, Librarian, School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
Molly Schoen, Information Resources/Technical Specialist, Visual Resources Collection, University of Michigan
Amanda Meeks, Reference and Instruction Librarian, Savannah College of Art and Design ACA Library, Atlanta


Join Us for Visualizing the Future: New Perspectives in Art Librarianship!

WebinarLogo

Our virtual conference is now open for registration! Check out our full line-up of spectacular speakers here.

This virtual conference will take place on Jan 17, 2015 at 12:00 PM CST.

Register now!

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4374379886671502081

ArLiSNAP and VREPS are proud to present our virtual conference, Visualizing the Future: New Perspectives in Art Librarianship. This event will serve as a venue for students and new professionals to present, share advice, and discuss the future of our evolving profession. For a full schedule and list of presentations, please visit arlisnap.org.

This event is free and open to all; attendees do not need to be members of ARLIS/NA or VRA. Registration will close two hours before the start of the webinar. For assistance, please contact webinars@arlisna.org. Additional information about webinars is available on the ARLIS/NA Learning Portal.

This webinar will be recorded, and the video will be made available on the ARLIS/NA Learning Portal within two weeks after the webinar.

By registering, I understand and acknowledge that this Webinar will be recorded by ARLIS/NA and/or those designated by ARLIS/NA. ARLIS/NA may record my name and questions I ask during the course of the Webinar presentation. As a condition of my participation in the Webinar, I agree to irrevocably grant to ARLIS/NA, its assigns, licensees and successors the right to publish, record, broadcast, exhibit, display, reproduce, edit or otherwise use perpetually throughout the world, in all media now and hereafter known or devised, in whole or in part, my name, questions, quotes and material otherwise provided by me (collectively, the “Material”) during my participation in the Webinar. I also agree that ARLIS/NA shall be the sole owner in perpetuity of any and all rights in and to any and all works containing the Material, in whole or in part, for all purposes whatsoever and in any manner or media including, without limitation, printed works, compact discs, DVDs, MP3, and computer on line services.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

View System Requirements


One Week Left to Submit Your Proposal for the ArLiSNAP/VREPS Virtual Conference!

We are very excited about the plans coming together for this event, and look forward to seeing your proposals! Have a look at the requirements here.

Here are a few of the reasons why you should get in on this fabulous opportunity:

reasonstopresent


Two Weeks Left to Submit Your Proposal for our Virtual Conference!

Don’t delay, submit today!

In case you need more persuading:

reasonstopresent


April 15th IFLA/ALA free webinar- New Librarians Global Connections: technology, innovation, and user needs

IFLA New Librarians Webinar

We are excited to announce the second installment of this year’s webinar series “New Librarians Global Connection: best practices, models and recommendations.”

http://www.ifla.org/node/8546

 

For the third consecutive year, IFLA Continuing Professional Development and Workplace Learning and IFLA New Professionals Special Interest Group are partnering with the American Library Association to present a series of free quarterly webinars on issues of interest to new librarians, library associations and library schools, library-decision makers, and all library workers. This is a great opportunity for membership participation via new worldwide online programming.

 

Our April webinar will focus on technology, innovation, and user needs. We’ve recruited an amazing panel of two experienced library industry leaders and a new professional to shed light on these issues in different parts of the world. Serving as keynote speaker will be Hugh Rundle, public librarian from Australia’s City of Boroondara Library Service. We hope you can join us!

 

Find details for our next webinar below, and don’t forget to save the date!

 

New Librarians, Global Connections: technology, innovation, and user needsApril 15, 20142:00 p.m. CDT3:00 p.m. EDT9:00 p.m. CETWorld Clock http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/  ***Link to webinar: http://ala.adobeconnect.com/r2003pt8eiz/*** Webinar length is approximately one hour. Use #newlibgc to talk about the webinar on social media.
Speakers
:

  • Keynote by Hugh Rundle, public librarian at the City of Boroondara Library Service (Australia) Topics: Antifragility and technolust
  • Celia Emmelhainz, Head of Libraries for Haileybury Astana International School (Kazakhstan) Topic: User-centered design

The topics for the webinars were compiled from global surveys, topics presented by speakers during the CPDWL and NPSIG programs at the WLIC 2013 in Singapore, NPSIG working group, and new librarians’ forums, listservs and online spaces.

 

The quarterly webinars are presented in January, April, July and October. Stay tuned for more news!

 

All webinars are recorded and archived online, so participants can either engage with the speakers and their international colleagues live or watch the presentations at a later date- anytime and anywhere. For more information about the 2012 and 2013 webinar series and to view/listen to previous webinars, visit http://npsig.wordpress.com/webinars/.


Free LLAMA Webinar Presents Interviewing Tips to Get a Job

The Library Leadership and Management Association (LLAMA) will present “Interviewing Tips to Get a Job” on Wed., April 9, 2014, from 1:30 PM to 3:00 PM (Central Time).  This free webinar will help prepare participants for interviewing and offer insight into the interviewing process from the employer’s viewpoint.  It will include examples of interviewing behavior and questions/answers to illustrate how to best prepare for impressing potential employers.

By the end of this webinar participants will:

  • Understand what interviewers desire in a candidate
  • Know how to prepare for different types of interviews (phone, video, in-person)
  • Know what to do and not do on interview day
  • Learn how to follow up after the interview

Presenter Sharon Holderman is the Coordinator of Public Services at Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, Tennessee.

 

Reserve your Webinar seat now at:
https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/476428906

 


Free Webinar 10 March: Expressing Preservation Requirements on Audiovisual Collections

“Expressing Preservation Requirements on Audiovisual Collections”. This is the third webinar in a series created by PrestoCentre and Presto4U on diverse topics related to AV digitisation and digital preservation.

This webinar is an introduction to expressing digital preservation requirements in the context of audiovisual collections, with a special emphasis on the approach followed by the Presto4U project. The webinar will start with the basics on what the requirements are, how they are created and for which purposes they serve. The webinar will then discuss how standards can play a key role in the expression of requirements for digital preservation and will exemplify the concept by showing how to use three standards: the OAIS reference model, the Ontology for Media Resources and the ISO/IEC 25010 System and Software Quality Requirments and Evaluation SQuaRE – System and Software Quality.

Date: Monday 10th March 2014
Time: 3.00pm – 4.00pm GMT/UTC (10:00am – 11:00am EST, 4:00pm – 5.00pm CET,7:00am – 8:00am PST)
Presenter: Carlo Meghini, researcher at CNR-ISTI in the area of Conceptual Modelling, Digital Libraries and Digital Preservation.

Make your free booking now at http://bit.ly/1k8QMNZ
Limited places available, registrations are on first-come, first-served basis.


ACRL Arts and ARLIS/NA Joint Webinar: Perspectives on Art Publishing

Perspectives on Art Publishing: Past, Present, Future and Open
Join us for a Webinar on February 28
Space is limited.
Reserve your Webinar seat now at:

https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/361529769
ARLIS/NA and ACRL Arts members are invited to attend this special joint webinar that explores the past, present, and future of scholarly publishing in the arts. 

Alexander Watkins, Art & Architecture Librarian at the University of Colorado Boulder, will discuss the Open Access movement in relation to arts journals, the future of arts scholarship, and potential roles for libraries and librarians. Open Access is about removing the walls around research, making scholarship universally available for free. The presentation will arm arts librarians with arguments and rationale that will help them promote Open Access in their own communities. (This presentation is encored from the ACRL Arts Discussion Forum at the 2013 ALA annual conference.) 


Ian McDermott (Collection Development Manager at ARTStor) and Erin Dunigan (Retail Manager at Park Life and recently Sales Associate at ARTBOOK | DAP) will explore the changing landscape of art book publishing in the face of
Amazon.com, bookstore closures, self-publishing, and shrinking library budgets. Their presentation will share how diverse publishers are approaching their long-term viability in the commercial and academic marketplaces and will invite discussion from the ARLIS and ACRL Arts communities about what this means for art librarians. (This presentation follows an article published in the Fall 2013 issue of Art Documentation and a panel discussion held at the New York Public Library on Feb. 12, 2013.) 

Only current ARLIS/NA and ACRL Arts members may attend this event. Registration will close February 27, 2014, one day before the webinar. For assistance, please contact 
webinars@arlisna.org

This webinar will be recorded, and the video will be made available to current members of ARLIS/NA and ACRL Arts members within two weeks after the webinar.

Upcoming ALCTS Webinar: How to Present a Webinar

ALCTS Webinar: How to Present a Webinar

Date: Wednesday, February 5, 2014

All webinars are one hour in length and begin at 11am Pacific, noon Mountain, 1pm Central, and 2pm Eastern time.

Description

Webinars have become a standard continuing education tool. ALCTS is committed to creating new webinars on emerging issues for all technical services topics, and we would like to train possible presenters on how to develop and present a webinar.

Join Keri Cascio, an experienced trainer and former chair of the ALCTS Continuing Education Committee, for a how-to presentation on webinars. Topics for this session include:

  • choosing your subject focus

  • structuring your webinar

  • keeping your attendees interested

Who Should Attend?

Anyone interested in being a webinar presenter should attend this session.

Presenter

Keri Cascio is the Director of Innovative Technologies and Library Resource Management at the Linda Hall Library of Science, Engineering & Technology. She has worked at various public libraries in Missouri and was a trainer for the Missouri Library Network Corporation. Keri currently serves as Director at Large for ALCTS, and was a member of the ALCTS Continuing Education Committee for five years. She holds a Masters in Library Science from the University of Missouri – Columbia.

 

*****************

Fee

Free

How to Register

Register here:  https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/505265208

Contact

For questions or comments related to this free webinar, contact Julie Reese, ALCTS Events Manager at 1-800-545-2433, ext. 5034 or jreese@ala.org.


Notes from the ARLIS/NA-MW Virtual Conference

On November 15th, ARLIS/NA-MW hosted the virtual conference Wide Angle: Perspectives on Visual + Media Arts Information. Here are some highlights from two of the talks that were presented.

Nicole Beatty, the Arts & Humanities Librarian at Weber State University, gave the presentation titled Digital Humanities: What is it and what does it mean for scholars and librarians? She noted that while the definition of what constitutes the Digital Humanities is still in flux, it is generally thought to refer to the use of a wide range of technologies to support research and education in the humanities. The technology used can include digitization, data visualization, geo-spatial mapping, cloud computing, social media, and more.

Some interesting examples of geo-spatial mapping include SFMOMA’s ArtScope and Mapping Gothic France. This blog shows some of the interesting possibilities when using data visualization to explore the collection of the Tate Galleries.

If you’re wondering where to find the tools for creating these projects, Beatty recommends Bamboo Dirt as a great place to start. This site lists a registry of digital research tools, and can help scholars find the software that fits their needs. If funding is an issue, as it often is, the National Endowment for the Humanities provides grants for those interested in pursuing projects in the digital humanities. We will likely see the number of projects in the digital humanities increase in the future, as Beatty explains that including these kinds of multi-media resources in instruction can help students to engage with the material in new ways.

Another presentation, titled From Commons to Open Content: New Perspectives on Visual Resources in the Public Trust, was given by Allana Mayer, MLIS Candidate from McGill University. She discussed the concept of Open Access, referring to content that may be used, reused and redistributed, often with certain restrictions.

One project Mayer discussed was the Library of Congress photostream on Flickr, a collection of images with no known copyright restrictions. The project started with 3,000 images, with 50 added every week, and approximately 75 institutions contributing since 2008. These images are suitable for reuse on websites and the like, but are not sufficiently high-quality to be used in a larger format. The Library of Congress invited Flickr users to tag and comment on photos, thereby learning more about images that formerly had little metadata associated with them. The project has stopped accepting new institutions, and is not currently expanding.

Another is the open content offered by the Rijksmuseum, which began with 125,000 images. These are high-quality images, but are offered under a non-commercial copyright restriction. The Rijksmuseum has also launched apps for creating content using their images. The Getty’s Open Content Program is another exciting recent initiative, with over 10,000 images available, requesting only that attribution be given to the Getty when an image is reproduced. NGA Images of The National Gallery of Art is a third excellent source of open access images, with over 29,000 images available for non-commercial use.

While there are legal issues to take into consideration when launching initiatives such as these, Mayer notes that many museum curators believe in the importance of sharing high-quality images of works of art with as wide an audience as possible.

The above links and more will be collected on ArLiSNAP’s pinterest page. For other useful links about digital humanities projects, follow our Technology pinboard; for open content links, have a look on the Open Access Images pinboard.


Webinar Series: What is a Data-Driven Academic Library?

Our readers who are interested in pursuing a career in academic libraries may be interested in this free webinar series, offered through Library Journal. Even if you’re not available when the webinars are running live, those who register will receive a link to the archive when it becomes available.

Part 1:  What is a Data-Driven Academic Library? Wednesday, December 4, 2013,
3:00-4:00 PM ET/12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT
Part 2:   The Evolution of Usage:
Analyzing and Benchmarking Use, Wednesday, December 11th, 2013,
3:00-4:00 PM ET/12:00 AM – 1:00 PM PT
Part 3:   Redefining Scholarly Value
Through New Data, Wednesday, December 18th, 2013, 3:00-4:00 PM ET/12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
PT

Complete details and links to register:  lj.libraryjournal.com/2013/11/webcasts/what-is-a-data-driven-academic-library/

CYNETART 2009 :: rehearsals for European Tele-Plateaus, by Matthias Härtig/TMA Hellerau. http://www.flickr.com/photos/body-bytes/4133106313/

CYNETART 2009 :: rehearsals for European Tele-Plateaus, by Matthias Härtig/TMA Hellerau. http://www.flickr.com/photos/body-bytes/4133106313/


Book fair, Travel Grants, & more!

As always, you can also see what’s coming up through the Educational Opportunities Calendar. Keep reading for details about all the great webinars, grants, scholarships and more opportunities below!

Book Fair:

The annual Book Paper Scissors Artists’ Book Fair, sponsored by the Art Department and Philadelphia Center for the Book, is being held in the Lobby of Parkway Central Library this Saturday, December 8th from 10-4. More than 20 artists will be showing and selling their work. This festive event features prints, artists’ books, handmade paper, zines, origami, blank books, paper sculpture, and jewelry, made by local artists. If it’s paper-based art, it’s here. Come and buy, or just be inspired! You will find hundreds of affordable and interesting gifts for everyone on your list by artists working in different disciplines at all price levels. This is a great opportunity to view and even handle unique works of art, to shop locally, and to purchase items crafted by hand.

There will also be 2 free workshops, taught by graduate students from the Book Arts/Printmaking program at the University of the Arts:

A Tale of Two Pamphlets with Erin Paulson

11 am-12 pm FREE Room 108

The pamphlet is a simple and elegant book structure that lends itself to many purposes, from zines to a special hand-written letter. In this workshop we will learn both the three-hole and the five-hole stitch, and you will walk away with two completed books!

For teens and adults.

Thaumatropes: Victorian era toys for kids

with J. Pascoe and Erin Malkowski

2 pm-3 pm FREE Room 108

This workshop will explore the amazing versatility of thaumatropes — a children’s toy popular in the Victorian era that is now seen as a precursor to modern animation. Children will learn about and experiment with the thaumatrope as a vehicle to understanding basic animation, eye-hand coordination, and creativity!

For kids of all ages.

The Lewis Walpole Library Fellowships & Travel Grants:

The Lewis Walpole Library, a department of Yale University Library, invites applications to its 2013–2014 fellowship program. Located in Farmington, Connecticut, the Library offers short-term residential fellowships and travel grants to support research in the Library’s rich collections of eighteenth-century—mainly British—materials, including important holdings of prints, drawings, manuscripts, rare books, and paintings, as well as a growing collection of sources for the study of New England Native Americans. Scholars pursuing postdoctoral or equivalent advanced research, as well as doctoral candidates at work on a dissertation, are encouraged to apply.

Recipients are expected to be in residence at the Library, to be free of other significant professional obligations during their stay, and to focus their research on the Lewis Walpole Library’s collections. Fellows also have access to additional resources at Yale, including those in the Sterling Memorial Library, the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, and the Yale Center for British Art. Residential fellowships, usually for one month, include the cost of travel to and from Farmington, accommodation in an eighteenth-century house on the Library’s campus, and a $2,100 living allowance stipend. Travel grants typically cover transportation costs for research trips of shorter duration and include on-site accommodation.

To apply for a fellowship or travel grant, candidates should send a curriculum vitae, including educational background, professional experience and publications, and a brief outline of the research proposal (not to exceed three pages) to:

Margaret K. Powell

W.S. Lewis Librarian and Executive Director

The Lewis Walpole Library

PO Box 1408

Farmington, CT 06034 USA

fax: 860-677-6369

e-mail: margaret.powell@yale.edu .

Two confidential letters of recommendation are also required by the application deadline. Letters should specifically address the merits of the candidate’s project and application. General letters of recommen­dation or dossier letters are not appropriate.

The application deadline is January 18, 2013.

Awards will be announced in March.

Additional information: http://www.library.yale.edu/walpole

Call for poster session proposals for ALA Annual Conference (Chicago 2013):

Share your best ideas and work with the national library community by presenting a poster session at the 2013 ALA Annual Conference in Chicago!

Start your application process now at http://ala13.ala.org/how-to-submit-a-poster-session. Note that the submission process has changed. You must create a username and password for the site before you submit your application, you must choose to submit a poster session proposal after you log-in, and you will receive a confirmation e-mail after you have completed your submission.

The deadline for submission of 2013 ALA Annual Conference poster session proposals is January 18.

The poster session committee encourages submissions from all types of libraries and on any topic relevant to librarianship. Submissions may include a description of an innovative library program; an analysis of a solution to a problem; a report of a research study; or any other presentation that would benefit the larger library community.

Poster session participants place materials such as pictures, data, graphs, diagrams and narrative text on boards that are usually 4 x 8 feet. During their assigned 11Ž2 hour time periods, participants informally discuss their presentations with conference attendees. Titles/abstracts from previous years, and pictures of sample posters, are available at the old poster session website: http://www.lib.jmu.edu/org/ala (note that this site is only serving as an archive for previous Annual Conference poster sessions – for information on this year’s posters, go to: http://ala13.ala.org/poster-sessions).

The deadline for submitting an application is January 18, 2013. Applicants will be notified in March, prior to the early bird registration deadline, whether their submission has been accepted for presentation at the conference. The 2013 ALA Annual Poster Sessions will be held June 29 and 30, 2013 (the Saturday and Sunday of the conference), at the McCormick Place convention center in Chicago.

Questions about poster session presentations and submissions may be directed to:

Luke Vilelle, chair of the ALA poster session committee, lvilelle@hollins.edu

Or

Candace Benefiel, chair of the ALA poster session review panel, cbenefie@lib-gw.tamu.edu

Internship opportunity:

The Frick Art Reference Library is seeking candidates for its summer 2013 internships. Openings are available in the following departments:

* Administrative Department

* Book Department

* Center for the History of Collecting

* Conservation Department

* Photoarchive Department

* Public Services Department

For more information about these and other internships at The Frick Collection, seehttp://www.frick.org/careers/internships.

Free talk:

The Columbia University Libraries invite you to attend “The Ethics of Visualization.”

This event is free and open to the public. Registration is not required.

TOPIC: The Ethics of Visualization

SPEAKER: Chris Alen Sula, Assistant Professor, Pratt Institute, School of Information & Library Science

WHEN: Wednesday, December 12, 2013

Noon – 1:30 PM

WHERE: 203 Butler Library

SPONSORS: Columbia Libraries Digital Program Division and the Digital Humanities Center

Visualization and infographics are widely discussed today, both inside of the academy and in the public at large. Academic departments as diverse as digital arts and humanities, cognitive science, and molecular chemistry have taken up the topic, and journalists like Geoff McGhee even claim that our future is one “in which data becomes a medium.” But despite its popularity and potential impact, “infovis” has rarely been considered in an ethical light. While there has been recent development on the philosophy of information, there is still little corresponding to an applied ethics of visualization and even less guidance available for information professionals. This talk examines the groundwork of infovis ethics and considers several ways in which visualization could give rise to obligations to/for certain groups. The conclusion will situate infovis within a techno-historical context, which raises broader issues of access, representation, and power with respect to visualization.

Webinar:

CORE Reference Fundamentals

An Infopeople online course, December 4, 2012 – Monday, January 21, 2013

Are you stepping into the role of providing reference assistance for the first time in your library career? Is it time to brush up on your basic skills because you are returning to work in a capacity that includes reference work with library users? In this 6-week course instructor Francisca Goldsmith will help you:

Learn and practice an effective reference interview.

Explore a wide variety of print and web-based tools.

Discover ways to assist diverse groups of users

Learn to think like an indexer and apply that perspective to your information hunting in response to reference questions.

For a complete course description and to register go to http://infopeople.org/training/core-reference-fundamentals-0

NOTE: This course is approved as covering the Reference and Information Services competencies for the LSSC program.

Gini Ambrosino, Infopeople Project Assistant

705 E. Bidwell, Suite 2 – 312

Folsom, CA 95630

(916) 690-6595

assist@infopeople.org

http://infopeople.org/


Professional development: CFPs, webinars, and volunteer opportunities

As always, you can also see what’s coming up through the Educational Opportunities Calendar. Keep reading for details about all the great webinars, CFPs, volunteer opportunities and more below!

CFP:

HTML5 and CSS3: Ready for Prime Time? Online Conference

Topic: HTML5 and CSS3

Deadline for Proposals: December 14, 2012

Conference Date: February 8, 2013

Location: Online

Form for Call for Proposals

HTML5 and CSS3 are two major web development standards today. Both have moved web authors into the present with options for incorporating more semantic elements, easier audio/video inclusion, APIs, and an ever-increasing formatting feature set. But how well supported are they today? Is it practical to use these standards with the browsers available today? Are there ways to incorporate parts of these standards or do web pages have to incorporate the entire standard? What are the “gotchas?”

This is the focus of Amigos’ February 8, 2013 online conference. We are looking for web developers that deal with library websites and have, either successfully or unsuccessfully, started incorporating HTML5 and/or CSS3 functionality. We’re searching for practical stories of what worked, what didn’t, and what you learned along the way. Do you use a HTML5/CSS3-compliant content management system? Or try to? Have you incorporated multimedia using HTML5? Are you using media queries? Have you started using more advanced selectors? We want to hear about everything related to HTML5 and CSS3.

The online conference will be held Friday, February 8th, 2013. We are looking for 45-minute sessions throughout the day. If you are interested, complete and submit our “Call for Proposals” form and we’ll be in touch. If you know someone who might be interested, please forward this invitation to them. We are looking for anyone who does web development, even indirectly, on your library’s website – whether they are library employees or not. All presenters will be comped for the conference!

The deadline for submitting proposals will be Friday, December 14, 2012.

FYI – We are fortunate to have Christopher Schmitt as our keynoter. Well-known for his work with the Web Standards Project , he heads the new media company and web design company called HeatVision.com and is the author of several books on standards-based web design.

If you have questions, please contact Christine Peterson, 800-843-8482 x2891.

 

 

CFP:

2013 Transitions in Collections: Print to Digital Workshop (Michigan Library Association)

Transitions in Collections: Print to Digital

Books, Bytes & Beyond

Friday, March 8, 2013

Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI

CALL FOR BREAK-OUT SESSION PROGRAM PROPOSALS

Submissions welcome through January 8, 2013

How is your library navigating the transition from print to digital resources? Have you found success in locating, organizing and managing digital resources? What innovative strategies are you using to help users’ access digital resources and successfully use them? What emerging digital resource trends is your library experimenting with?

Now in its third year, the 2013 Print to Digital (P2D) Workshop continues its emphasis on the ongoing transition from print to digital collections, looking at how libraries are effectively navigating the process. Geared toward academic, public, school and special librarians, this year’s event seeks to help participants identify emerging trends and gain a greater understanding of how to manage and access digital resources.

We invite your proposals on topics ranging from collection development issues to digital rights management to determining the cost/benefit of implementing new digital services to educating users on accessing and using digital materials. Consider sharing your experiences with others and submitting a program proposal!

Please submit your proposal by email and include the following information:

• Session title

• Description of session

• 1 Goal & 2 Objectives for your presentation

• Presenter(s)’ names, titles, organization

• Presenter(s)’ contact information

Note: All presentation rooms include a computer and projection capability.

Proposals will be accepted until Tuesday, January 8, 2013. Presenters will be notified by Friday, January 11, 2013 that their submissions have been accepted.

Please use this email subject line format: 2013 MLA P2D Call Proposal + Your Presentation Title + Your Name

Send proposals to Stephanie D. Davis, davisstephand@jccmi.edu

 

 

Webinar:

You are invited to attend a special joint webinar co-organized by ARLIS/NA and ACRL Arts Section. Attendance is free, but you must be a current member of either ARLIS/NA or ACRL Arts. Use the link below to register; you will receive the webinar login information once your membership status is confirmed. Hope to see you there!

Imagining, Innovating, Leading: Exploring the Connections Between Librarianship and Creativity

Join us for a Webinar on December 7

Space is limited.

Reserve your Webinar seat now at:

https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/366707872

ARLIS/NA and ACRL Arts Section members are invited to attend this special joint webinar that explores the role of librarians’ individual creativity and its effects in the library workplace and greater community.

Tina Chan, Reference/Instruction Librarian at SUNY-Oswego, will discuss On My Own Time, a community event that celebrates the creative talent of faculty and staff who are visual artists “on their own time.” SUNY Oswego participated in On My Own Time to recognize employees’ individual artistic talents and to foster imagination and creativity among employees. (Chan’s presentation is encored from the ACRL-Arts discussion forum at the 2012 ALA annual conference.)

Annette Haines, Art & Design Field Librarian at the University of Michigan, will explore the existing theories and ideas on workplace creativity and how they apply to librarianship. Haines stresses the imperative of putting creative work first and offers strategies librarians can apply to manage workplace stress and foster creativity in themselves and others. (Haines’ presentation is an encore from the 2012 ARLIS/NA annual conference.)

*Attendance is limited to current ARLIS/NA and ACRL-Arts members only. Registration will close at 11am Central on 12/7/2012. A limited number of seats are available and successful registration does not guarantee a reservation. Attendees are encouraged to log-in just before the start of the webinar to help ensure a seat. By registering for this event you allow your name and contact information to be shared with the membership committees of ARLIS/NA and ACRL-Arts for analysis and possible follow-up. A recording for this webinar will be made available for members two weeks after the webinar date. Questions may be directed to webinars@arlisna.org

Title:

Imagining, Innovating, Leading: Exploring the Connections Between Librarianship and Creativity

Date:

Friday, December 7, 2012

Time:

1:00 PM – 2:00 PM CST

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar.

System Requirements

PC-based attendees

Required: Windows® 7, Vista, XP or 2003 Server

Mac®-based attendees

Required: Mac OS® X 10.5 or newer

Mobile attendees

Required: iPhone®, iPad®, Android™ phone or Android tablet

 

Call for volunteers:

The 2013 Conference Planning Advisory Committee is seeking volunteers to assist with the ARLIS/NA 41st Annual Conference. We need volunteers to assist with the registration/hospitality desks, tours, and exhibit hall during the conference, 25 – 29 April, 2013 in Pasadena, CA. Please consider contributing to the conference by volunteering two to three hours of your time. Interested volunteers may contact Virginia Allison-Reinhardt (virginia@lalouver.com) or Krista Ivy (krista.ivy@ucr.edu) with your name, email, institution, and category of interest. We will be in touch with a call for desired shifts once the conference schedule has been published. This is a great way to get to know fellow art library professionals. Many thanks for considering!

Virginia and Krista,

2013 Hospitality/Registration Co-Chairs

Virginia Allison-Reinhardt:

virginia@lalouver.com

Krista Ivy:

krista.ivy@ucr.edu


Free webinar, VRA travel award, & CFP

As always, you can also see what’s coming up through the Educational Opportunities Calendar. Keep reading for details about all the great webinars, CFPs, and scholarship opportunities below!

Webinar:

Title: Communicating Through Infographics

Presenter: Dawne Tortorella

Format: Webinar

Date: Wednesday, November 14, 2012

Start Time: 12 Noon Pacific

1PM Mountain

2PM Central

3PM Eastern

This webinar will last approximately one hour. Webinars are free of charge. Please note: we have changed hosting services fromWebEx to Adobe Connect, so we advise you to test your browser before the webinar: http://intesolv.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm

For more webinar tips, see: http://infopeople.org/webinar/tips.

For more information and to participate in the Wednesday, November 14, 2012 webinar, go to http://infopeople.org/training/communicating-through-infographics.

· Have you noticed the growing trend of communicating through infographics?

· Do you wonder where the data comes from and how to verify information displayed in visual form?

· Would you rather read a 100 page report or look at a visual presentation that conveys the story in less than one minute?

· Would you like to tell a compelling story about your library through the medium of infographics?

Visual representation of information has existed for hundreds of years in various forms and formats. Infographics (information graphics) represent the latest visual form to gain popularity. Telling an effective story through infographics requires accurate data, compelling design, and visualization tools.

During this one-hour webinar, we will discuss and demonstrate:

· blogs and infographic search resources to find examples and track trends

· differences between infographics, poster art, and data visualization

· common data sources used in infographics (big data and local sources)

· suggest library-specific data and statistics appropriate for visual presentation

· visualization tools for experimentation

This webinar will be of interest to library staff at all levels and in all types of libraries who need to present information to customers, stakeholders, and management. Senior staff and directors responsible for board reporting are especially encouraged to attend. If you are unable to attend the live event, you can access the archived version the day following the webinar. Check our archive listing at: http://infopeople.org/training/view/webinar/archived.

 VRA Travel Award:

VRA Travel Awards are available for attendance at the 2013 VRA conference “Capitalizing on Creativity” in Providence, Rhode Island April 3-6. The deadline for receipt of applications will be Monday, November 26, 10 am EST. The list of recipients will be announced on the VRA listserv the third week of December.

A preliminary conference schedule with a listing of workshops and sessions has already been posted at: http://vra2013annualconference.sched.org and information about costs is posted here:http://www.vraweb.org/conferences/vra31/?page_id=8 and here: http://www.vraweb.org/conferences/vra31/?page_id=11

Before you apply, PLEASE READ “Travel Award Rules and Guidelines”, “Tips for VRA Travel Awards Applicants”, and “Types of Travel Awards”, all linked here as PDFs: http://www.vraweb.org/about/awards/index.html#travel

HERE’S THE LINK TO THE APPLICATION:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dEM1Zkdsdlo2dGZ1TEJRN3hGQWxjR2c6MQ#gid=0

The form is also linked from the What’s New on the VRA homepage.

You do not need to be a member of the VRA to apply for a travel award, but please note that upon winning an award an applicant who is not a member of VRA must purchase a membership, with the option to use funding from the travel award to do this. This year by removing the membership requirement for all applicants, we hope to draw more interest and expand membership.

In order to allow funding to go further, Tansey awards will be distributed according to financial need i.e. full awards (up to $850) may be given to some, whilst lower amounts may be awarded to others with partial institutional/ other support.

For 2013, we are fortunate to have generous financial support from sponsors and funds provided by the membership:

* The Kathe Hicks Albrecht award of $850 for a first-time conference attendee

* Two New Horizons awards of $850 each. These awards are aimed at members in the following categories: solo VR professionals, part-time VR professionals, geographically isolated VR professionals, VR professionals in smaller institutions, and/or first-time attendees

* The Joseph C. Taormina Memorial award of $250 for an applicant with partial funding

* A New Horizons student award of $300, for a full-time student enrolled in an accredited degree program and considering a career in visual resources

* $4800 in Tansey fund awards ranging from $250 to $850 each

More awards may become available and will be announced on this listserv. Also, stay tuned and watch VRA-L and the VRA website for further details about the conference. Please email if you have any questions not answered by the documents noted above.

So don’t delay – apply today!

We look forward to receiving your applications,

Heidi Eyestone & Vicky Brown

Co-Chairs, VRA Travel Awards Committee

Heidi Eyestone

Visual Resources Collection

Art and Art History

Carleton College

One North College Street

Northfield, MN 55057

507 222-5399

507 222-7042 fax

Vicky Brown, Visual Resources Curator

History of Art Department, University of Oxford

Suite 9, Littlegate House

St Ebbes

Oxford OX1 1PT

UK

+44 (0)1865 286839

victoria.brown@hoa.ox.ac.uk

 

CFP:

Call for Book Chapters: Collecting the Contemporary (Book to be published by MuseumsEtc in 2013)

URL: http://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0062/7112/files/CFP_CollectingTheContemporary.pdf?5

COLLECTING THE CONTEMPORARY

Edited by Owain Rhys and Zelda Baveystock

We invite international submissions to be included in this forthcoming book, to be published by MuseumsEtc in 2013.

The book will be edited by Owain Rhys, Curator of Contemporary Life at St Fagans: National History Museum, Wales and Zelda Baveystock, Lecturer in Arts Management and Museum Studies at Manchester University.

Why and how should social history museums engage with contemporary collecting? To fill gaps in the collection? To record modern urban life? To engage with minority communities? To link past and present? There are many possible responses… And many museums collect contemporary objects, stories, images and sounds – consciously or unconsciously. But reasoned policies and procedures are very often lacking. And – given the uniquely detailed record of contemporary life recorded by ubiquitous media – how best are museums to record and present contemporary life in their collections?

 

An overview of contemporary collecting in a social historical context is well overdue. Original source material, ideas, developments and research has never before been brought together in a single volume. This book will bring together practitioners from around the world to provide a contemporary and convenient reader which aims to lay the foundations for future initiatives.

We welcome submissions – of between 3000 and 5000 words – on the practice, theory and history of contemporary collecting in social history museums, based on – but not confined to – the following issues and themes. We are particularly interested in new and pioneering initiatives and innovative thinking in this field.

Practice

Projects (including community outreach, externally funded collection programmes, projects with specific goals)

Exhibitions (including popular culture, contemporary political issues, under-represented groups

Networks – including SAMDOK and other initiatives

Fieldwork and contemporary collecting

Adopting a scientific approach to contemporary collecting

Audio-visual recording

The influence of the internet, how to collect, and associated museological issues

Contemporary collecting and contemporary issues

Access, storage and conservation issues

Theory

What to collect?

How to collect?

Who should collect?

Community involvement – advantages and disadvantages

Contemporary collecting – key priority or passing fad?

Definitions of contemporary collecting

Should contemporary collecting be object or people based?

Alternatives to the accepted norms

The case for nationally or regionally co-ordinated policies

The impact of social and digital media for the future of contemporary collecting

History

Origins and development of contemporary collecting

Differences between institutions and countries (e.g. Sweden’s ethnological approach v. Britain’s social history approach)

The editors

Owain Rhys has recently published Contemporary Collecting: Theory and Practice with MuseumsEtc. This book gathered together disparate strands of contemporary collecting theory and history, and provided an insight into current practices at St Fagans: National History Museum. Owain is interested in formalising definitions and procedures, and in strengthening the bonds between those museums involved in contemporary collecting. Zelda Baveystock has a longstanding interest in contemporary collecting. As the first Keeper of Contemporary Collecting at Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums, she established a subject specialist network of urban history museums actively involved in the field in 2004. She has lectured and taught on the subject in the UK, and in Sweden.

Submissions

If you are interested in being considered as a contributor, please send an abstract (up to 250 words) and a short biography to both the editors and the publishers at the following addresses: owain.rhys@museumwales.ac.uk,zelda.baveystock@manchester.ac.uk and books@museumsetc.com by 10 December 2012. Enquiries should also be sent to these addresses. Contributors will receive a complimentary copy of the publication and a discount on more.

The book will be published in print and digital editions by MuseumsEtc in 2013.

Deadlines

ABSTRACTS: 10 DECEMBER 2012

CONTRIBUTORS NOTIFIED: 11 JANUARY 2013

COMPLETED PAPERS: 2 APRIL 2013

 


Upcoming professional development opportunities

As always, you can also see what’s coming up through the Educational Opportunities Calendar. Keep reading for details about all the great webinars, CFPs, and more opportunities below!

 

Adventures in International Librarianship: Living and Working Outside of the United States

Are you interested in finding a job in library and information science outside of North America? Are you curious about what it’s like to live and work in a different culture? If so, please join us for a ELIME-hosted online panel discussion on Tuesday 6 November! Our panelists represent an incredible variety of experiences, and have worked all over the world from Switzerland to Azerbaijan to Japan.

You have two opportunities to attend. The first session will take place at 9am EST, and the second at noon EST. Note that the panelists are different for each session, so you could even attend both for a wider perspective. For more information:http://elime.web.unc.edu/interlib/

 

Call for Proposals: ACRL Image Resources Interest Group ALA Mid-Winter Meeting (held online)

The Association of College and Research Libraries Image Resources Interest Group is accepting proposals for our Mid-Winter meeting, to be held online (using Adobe Connect) on Thurs. Feb. 14, 2013, at 1:30 p.m. CST.

We are seeking proposals for presentations, of about 30 minutes in length, to be followed by questions/answers. Suggested topics include:

Image metadata

Project planning with images

Geolocation metadata

Image collections across systems and platforms

Collaboration with academic departments/community outreach

Visual literacy standards implementation

Digital capture

We are interested in all aspects of image resources and look forward to varied presentations and creative projects.

Please submit proposals or questions to robin.leech@okstate.edu. Proposal deadline is Nov. 30, 2012. Proposals need to include:

Name

Institution

Address

City/State/Zip

Phone

Email

Proposal Title

Brief proposal description (150 words or less)

Expected outcomes

Submitters will be notified by the week of Dec. 10th, 2012.

Please visit https://sites.google.com/site/acrlirig/ for additional information.

 

The ACRL Arts Section is seeking contributors for the Seattle ArtsGuide for the upcoming 2013 ALA Midwinter Conference! The ArtsGuide is a semi-annual guide and customized Google Map developed by theACRL Arts Section’s Publications & Research Committee to help ALA conference attendees find arts-related venues and events in and around host cities. You do not have to be a member to be a contributor, but it’s a great opportunity to get involved with the ACRL Arts Section. It’s also a fun way to contribute your knowledge of the area to enhance everyone’s conference experience! You can see previous ArtsGuides here:

http://www.ala.org/acrl/aboutacrl/directoryofleadership/sections/arts/artswebsite/artsguide/artsguides

Please let me know which section you’re interested in contributing to:

Visual Arts & Museums

Galleries

Architecture

Dance

Music

Theater

Submissions would be due by December 3, 2012. If you’re interested please contact me as soon as possible.

Yvette Cortes

Chair, ACRL Arts Section’s Publications & Research Committee

ycortes@skidmore.edu

 

“Introduction to Spatial Literacy and Online Mapping”

You may use tools like Google Maps in your personal life all the time for locating restaurants and local businesses, driving directions or planning trips via public transportation, but have you considered how this same technology could be used at your library to improve library services? RUSA’s online course “Introduction to Spatial Literacy and Online Mapping” is the perfect opportunity for librarians and library staff from public and academic libraries to gain a basic understanding of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology and learn about specific technologies they may be exposed to at the library. Registration for this course, which runs Nov. 5-25, ends on Thursday, Nov. 1.

REGISTER ONLINE NOW: http://www.ala.org/Template.cfm?Section=oloc&Template=/Conference/ConferenceList.cfm&ConferenceTypeCode=L

If you’ve already taken this introductory course or have a good working knowledge of GIS and want to go further, consider enrolling in “Spatial Literacy II: Incorporation of Maps and GIS”, which shows you how to harness these technologies for reference work, library projects, library administration, collection delivery, instruction, outreach and library promotion. The next session of this course begins Dec. 3.

Wouldn’t it be awesome if several of your staff could take this course and your library could reap the benefits in improved library services? Group discounts are available! Rates for two or more registrants from the same library, library network or library system start at $110 per person.

Learn more about all of our courses and webinars at the RUSA online learning page: http://www.ala.org/rusa/development/onlinece

Register online now for this and other upcoming RUSA courses:

http://www.ala.org/Template.cfm?Section=oloc&Template=/Conference/ConferenceList.cfm&ConferenceTypeCode=L

Questions about registration? Contact registration@ala.org or (800) 545-2433, option 5.

 

 


CFP, Reviewer, & Webinars

As always, you can also see what’s coming up through the Educational Opportunities Calendar. Keep reading for details about all the great webinars, CFPs, internships and more opportunities below!

CFP:

Libraries, Archives, and Museums Area – Popular Culture Association and American Culture Association

The Popular Culture Association and the American Culture Association annual conference will be held March 27 – March 30, 2013 at the Wardman Park Marriott in Washington, DC. Scholars from a wide variety of disciplines will meet to share their Popular Culture research and interests. The Libraries, Archives, Museums, and Popular Culture area is soliciting papers dealing with any aspect of Popular Culture as it pertains to libraries, archives, museums, or research. Possible topics include descriptions of research collections or exhibits, studies of popular images of libraries or librarians, relevant analyses of social networking or web resources, Popular Culture in library education, the future of libraries and librarians, or reports on developments in technical services for collecting/preserving Popular Culture materials. Papers from graduate students are welcome. Prospective presenters should enter their proposals in the PCA/ACA 2013 Event Management database at http://ncp.pcaaca.org. The deadline is November 30, 2012. Please direct any queries to the Libraries, Archives, Museums, and Popular Culture area chair:

Allen Ellis

Professor of Library Services

W. Frank Steely Library

Northern Kentucky University

Highland Heights, KY 41099-6101

USA

859-572-5527

ellisa[at]nku[dot]edu

For more information see the associations’ website at: http://pcaaca.org/national-conference-2/

Call for  Reviewers:

The coeditors for ARLIS/NA Reviews (http://www.arlisna.org/pubs/reviews/index.html) are seeking reviewers for the January/February 2013 edition.

You must notify one of the coeditors by no later than Friday, October 12 of your interest in reviewing one of the titles listed below. Please note in your response if your subject background or expertise matches the subject matter of the book. Also, you must be able to meet a December 7, 2012 deadline with a 450 word review. Please do not volunteer to review if you doubt you will be able to meet the deadline.

The Ancient Middle Classes: Urban Life and Aesthetics in the Roman Empire 100 BCE – 250 CE, by Emanuel Mayer

The Art of Modern China, by Julia F. Andrews and Kuiyi Shen

The Breathless Zoo: Taxidermy and the Cultures of Longing, by Rachel Poliquin

British Aviation Posters: Art, Design and Flight, by Scott Anthony and Oliver Green

Exchanging Clothes: Habits of Being 2, by Cristina Giorcelli and Paula Rabinowitz, eds.

Manifestations: New Native Art Criticism, Nancy Mithlo, ed.

Oh, Canada: Contemporary Art from North North America, by Denise Markonish, ed.

On the Animation of the Inorganic: Art, Architecture, and the Extension of Life, by Spyros Papapetros

Pop! Design, Culture, Fashion 1956-1976, by Geoffrey Rayner, Richard Chamberlain, and Annamarie Stapleton

Publishing the Fine and Applied Arts 1500-2000, by Robin Myers, Michael Harris, and Giles Madelbrote, eds.

We are also looking for volunteers who are willing to write a dual review of the books below. Both books would be included in a single 600 word review, also due by December 7, 2012.

Mexican Muralism: A Critical History, by Alejandro Anreus, Robin Adele Greeley, and Leonard Folgarait AND

How a Revolutionary Art Became Official Culture: Murals, Museums, and the Mexican State, by Mary K. Coffey

Landscape in Photographs, by Karen Hellman and Brett Abbott AND

Sense of Place: European Landscape Photography, by Liz Wells, ed.

Doug Litts & Terrie Wilson

littsd[at]si[dot]edu / wilso398[at]mail[dot]lib[dot]msu[dot]edu

ARLIS/NA Reviews Co-Editors

Webinars:

1. Title: Personal Gadgets and the Library

Presenter: Jason Griffey

Format: Webinar

Date: Tuesday, October 9, 2012

Start Time:

12 Noon Pacific

1PM Mountain

2PM Central

3PM Eastern

This webinar will last approximately one hour. Webinars are free of charge. Please note: we have changed hosting services fromWebEx to Adobe Connect, so we advise you to test your browser before the webinar: http://intesolv.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm

For more webinar tips, see: http://infopeople.org/webinar/tips

For more information and to participate in the Tuesday, October 9, 2012 webinar, go to http://infopeople.org/training/personal-gadgets-and-library

Personal electronics such as tablet computers, ebook readers, MP3 players, and more are now a common part of our information interactions in the library world. Customers are checking gadgets out from us, asking us for content that can be loaded on them, and at times just wishing that we could help them use them more effectively.

This webinar will give a broad overview of personal electronics in libraries, focusing on iOS and Android based devices and their management, from both a user and staff perspective.

At the end of this one-hour webinar, participants will:

•Understand abilities and limitations of both iOS (Apple) and Android systems

•Have a set of tools to explore in management of both

•Know where to go for help with personal electronics

This webinar will be of interest to anyone that provides services in or around libraries, to either users of the library or to the staff of the library.

If you are unable to attend the live event, you can access the archived version the day following the webinar. Check our archive listing at: http://infopeople.org/training/view/webinar/archived

 

2. Title: Telling Your Story: Five Secrets for Successful Career Growth and Advancement

Webinar Series: Expanding Your Career Potential

Presenters: Deb Hunt and David Grossman

Format: Webinar

Date: Wednesday, October 10, 2012

Start Time:

12 Noon Pacific

1PM Mountain

2PM Central

3PM Eastern

This webinar will last approximately one hour. Webinars are free of charge. Please note: we have changed hosting services fromWebEx to Adobe Connect, so we advise you to test your browser before the webinar: http://intesolv.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm

For more webinar tips, see: http://infopeople.org/webinar/tips

For more information and to participate in the Wednesday, October 10, 2012

webinar, go to http://infopeople.org/training/telling-your-story

How can librarians and information professionals:

Learn the secrets to the type of successful interactions that will lead to career growth and advancement?

Develop talking points to effectively convey their story to maximize their potential for career growth and advancement?

Learn how to take advantage of every opportunity, no matter how brief, to tell an encapsulated version of their story?

Maximize their chances of always getting to “yes”?

Become aware and gain access to the wide variety of job opportunities that take them beyond the limitations of the “L” word.

In today’s complex, fast changing world, having the right skills is not enough for those seeking career growth and advancement. Librarians and information professionals also need to communicate well and effectively tell their story. This webinar helps librarians and information professionals develop the necessary “talking points” to help them communicate their most important message and formulate an encapsulated version of their talking points to be able to take advantage of every window of opportunity, regardless of how brief it might be. Librarians and information professionals often miss some of the best career opportunities because they are stuck on the “L” word. This webinar will help attendees locate and identify many career opportunities that are outside the “L” word and help them prepare to take advantage of those opportunities.

At the end of this one-hour webinar, participants will:

Understand the importance of successful interactions for career growth and advancement

Learn the five secrets of successful interactions with colleagues, management and gatekeepers in their organizations

Know how to develop convincing talking points, including an “elevator pitch,” that will assure their success in any situation

Learn how to use their talking points to get buy-in and get to “yes” as quickly and often as possible

Know how to prepare themselves for one of the numerous alternative career opportunities readily available to librarians and information professionals

This webinar will be of interest to library staff contemplating the next job opportunity or career change and those seeking to identify their current skills and acquire new skills.

Webinars are free of charge, you can pre-register by clicking on the Join Webinar button now or go directly to the webinar by clicking on Join Webinar on the day of the event on the Adobe Connect server. If you pre-registered you can use your email address and password you created to speed up entry to the webinar. If you did not preregister and you login within 30 minutes of the event you can enter as a guest without a password.

If you are unable to attend the live event, you can access the archived version the day following the webinar. Check our archive listing at: http://infopeople.org/training/view/webinar/archived


Educational Opportunities!

There are A LOT of educational opportunities in this post so read carefully! As always, you can also see what’s coming up through the Educational Opportunities Calendar. Keep reading for details about all the great webinars, CFPs, internships and more opportunities below!

Webinars/Online Chats

  1. Mark your calendar now for Sept 13th chat: Tips for a successful job interview. Open to all! http://connect.ala.org/node/186969. The interview stage of a job search can be riddled with emotions; excitement, nervousness, and stress to name a few. This chat will explore some of the ways you can be better prepared for your big day. Topics to guide our discussion include but are not limited to what activities your interview day may include, how you should prepare, how should you dress, what questions you might expect to get from the search committee, and what to expect after your interview is complete. While we will focus on academic libraries, many of the topics cross-over to other types of libraries. Please come with your questions and be prepared for a fun and informative chat! Deana Groves, ALCTS New Members Interest Group (ANMIG) Webmaster, will be your host along with the assistance of Liz Siler, ALCTS ANMIG Chair. The chat will be on September 13th from 2:00 – 3:00pm EST and is open to ALA members of all types. To join the chat: connect.ala.org/node/186576
  2. Title:  Successful Librarians Share Their Stories of Career Growth and Advancement
    Presenters:  Deb Hunt and David Grossman
    Format:  Webinar
    Date:  Thursday, September 6, 2012 Start Time:       12 Noon Pacific 1PM Mountain 2PM Central 3PM Eastern. This webinar will last approximately one hour. Webinars are free of charge.  Please note: we have changed hosting services fromWebEx to Adobe Connect, so we advise you to test your browser before the webinar: http://intesolv.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm For more webinar tips, see: http://infopeople.org/webinar/tips. For more information and to participate in the Thursday, September 6, 2012 webinar, go to http://infopeople.org/training/librarians-share-their-stories. How are some librarians finding practical ways to cope, successfully navigate, and even thrive in the face of a lingering recession? How can you recognize and avoid the most common mistakes that can determine the difference between success and failure in any career situation? How can you to reinvent yourself and prepare for success in a new career in a very different or less traditional role? What secrets can be learned from successful individuals who have become leaders in the library/information profession? What new career opportunities are possible for you and how can you plan a strategy to pursue something new? This webinar will assist library staff, both professional and paraprofessional, in understanding the wide range of career opportunities available to them and how to visualize a path to success. A number of successful and unsuccessful stories will be discussed. Attendees will review and analyze successful and unsuccessful case studies to help them chart a path to career advancement, such as moving into a less traditional library role or making a lateral move into a very different career.  They will also learn how to identify, select and acquire the most relevant “front runner” or leadership “personas” that contribute to professional success in the current climate. At the end of this one-hour webinar, participants will: Be able to envision their path to advancement through the analysis of the accomplishments of other librarians and information professionals who have successfully climbed the organizational ladder, transitioned into a new career, or become a “front runner” or leader in our profession. Learn how to continually reinvent themselves to overcome adversity and achieve success in any work environment. Gain insight into some exciting career opportunities often overlooked by librarians and information professionals. Know how to prepare themselves for one of the numerous alternative career opportunities readily available to librarians and information professionals. This webinar will be of interest to professional and paraprofessional library staff contemplating the next job opportunity or career change and those seeking to identify their current skills and acquire new ones. This is the third in a series of four webinars presented by Deb Hunt and David Grossman. You can view their previous webinars at http://infopeople.org/training/identifying-and-acquiring-new-skills. If you are unable to attend the live event, you can access the archived version the day following the webinar.  Check our archive listing at:  http://infopeople.org/training/view/webinar/archived

Internships

  1. Call for applications: 2013 ARLIS/NA Internship Award. Please share with current students and recent graduates of graduate programs in library science, art history, architectural history, architecture, studio art or museum studies. The Art Libraries Society of North America is now accepting applications for its annual Internship Award for 2013.

    The ARLIS/NA Internship Award provides financial support for students preparing for a career in art librarianship or visual resources curatorship. The award grants $2,500.00 to the selected recipient to support a period of internship in an art library or visual resources collection.
    The deadline for applications is October 15, 2012.
    For detailed information about the award and application instructions please see the ARLIS/NA website: http://www.arlisna.org/about/awards/internship_info.html

  2. WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART LIBRARY FALL INTERN PROGRAM 2012 — Library and Archives. The Whitney Museum of American Art Library is seeking applicants for internships to begin this fall 2012.  Under the supervision of professional library staff, interns will gain first-hand museum library experience by participating in regular departmental activities that range from research to routine administrative and clerical tasks.  Each intern will also focus on one individual project.  Participants must be willing to commit to at least 120 hours during the semester and may arrange to receive college credit.

    QUALIFICATIONS AND APPLICATION PROCEDURE: Preferred candidates are students already enrolled in a certified graduate library degree program with an interest in American art and/or museum work, have internship or experience working in a library and excellent administrative skills.  If interested, please submit, via e-mail, your cover letter, current resume and references to library[at]whitney[dot]org .  Please include dates you will be available for an interview with Library staff.

CFPS

  1. ACRL 2013 Conference Call for Poster Proposals
    Got an innovative library-based project, best practices to solve a problem, or unique research findings? Consider sharing them in a poster session! Posters should be an eye-catching visual representation of a topic, including graphics, tables, charts, text, and images. Presenters can communicate additional details via online handouts. Presenters share their ideas with colleagues as attendees circulate during one hour time blocks in the poster session area, located in the exhibits hall. Since space is limited at a poster session, a maximum of two presenters per poster at any one time is recommended. The Poster Session Committee looks for topics that will engage attendees during repeated presentations.
    Potential topics can be seen in the program tags that are included on the proposal instructions page (link below). Poster topics from underrepresented categories are of particular interest.  Here are some examples:
    cataloging & technical services
    collections projects
    preservation projects
    digitization
    data management and services
    Use the application form to sell your idea in a short, dynamic summary and provide a more complete discussion of the contents for the reviewers.  Please plan to submit an electronic version of your poster so that it can be posted online with conference handouts. Submissions are due by November 9, 2012.
    Program Proposal Instructions https://s4.goeshow.com/acrl/national/2013/abstract_instruct.cfm
    Proposal Submission Form  https://s4.goeshow.com/acrl/national/2013/abstract_submission.cfm
    Questions should be directed to Margot Conahan at mconahan[at]ala[dot]org or call (312) 280-2522.
  2. Marginalized Bodies:  Studies in Deformities and Disabilities in Early Modern Art
    Deformities and disabilities have been depicted in art since antiquity, and yet a comprehensive text on the subject as it pertains to art of the Early Modern era has yet to be written. Barry Wind glosses over the topic in A Foul and Pestilent Congregation, dealing primarily with dwarfism and gibbosity as they pertain only to the themes of “the world upside down” and the Commedia dell’ Arte.  These tropes of entertainment or curiosity are also discussed in monographs, mainly on artists like Velazquez and Callot, again limiting the discussions to depictions of dwarves at court and the comical aspects of deformity.  Deformities and disabilities also figure in texts on teratology and the kunstkammer, for example, Datson and Park’sWonders and the Order of Nature. The richness of the social, cultural, religious, political, and philosophical aspects of deformity and disability in the Early Modern era have yet to be revealed.  We wish to address this lacuna in Early Modern art scholarship by producing an anthology that integrates all aspects of deformity and disabilities as depicted in Early Modern art, utilizing an all-inclusive perspective.  We seek papers that offer particular case studies on Early Modern depictions of deformities and disabilities that address the subject from this broader outlook.
    Topics might include the apotropaic qualities of deformity and disabilities, deformities and disabilities as a means to exercising charity—the Catholic and Protestant approaches, deformed and disabled beggars, deformed and disabled saints, demonizing/idealizing deformities and disabilities, deformities and disabilities caused by disease, deformities and disabilities as reflections of sin, deformity and disability in mythology, deformed and disabled artists, aging and disability in artists and patrons, considerations of deformities and disabilities in architecture, the theoretical aspects of depicting the hideous in art, the treatment  of deformity and disability in portraiture, concealment/disclosure of deformities and disabilities, and scapegoating the deformed and disabled at times of catastrophic  events.
    To be considered for the project, kindly submit a 500 word abstract to Sandra Cheng (schengnyc[at]gmail[dot]com), Kimberlee A. Cloutier-Blazzard (kac9b[at]mindspring[dot]com), and Lilian H. Zirpolo (lilianzirpolo[at]gmail[dot]com), along with a short CV, by September 15, 2012.

Conferences & Continuing Education

  1. We are looking for additional peer reviewers for Art Documentation, the journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America.  We welcome reviewers in all areas of interest and expertise, but in particular we are seeking those with the knowledge and background to be able to review articles about cataloging/metadata, digital collections, museum libraries, and new media/new technology.
    Reviewers are needed for the Spring 2013 issue.  You would receive the article by September 15 and have 3 weeks to prepare your comments and recommendations.  We’d like to expand the pool of reviewers for future issues as well, so even if you are not available at this time but are interested in reviewing, I would like to hear from you.
    Please follow this link to take the short Survey Monkey survey to indicate your interest in reviewing, your availability, and your areas of expertise:
    https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/BZL3QPR
  2. Archiving the Arts:
    addressing preservation in the creative process
    Saturday, October 13, 2012
    9:00 AM–5:00 PM
    Michelson Theater
    NYU Tisch School of the Arts
    Department of Cinema Studies
    721 Broadway, 6th Floor
    New York, NY 10003
    Presented by:
    Association of Moving Image Archivists Student Chapter at New York University
    and Independent Media Arts Preservation (IMAP)
    Archiving the Arts unlocks dialogue concerning preventive preservation, the creative process, and where the two concepts intersect.
    Unlike corporate or policy-based content, independent media art evolves and is often born from fleeting processes, creative approaches, and undocumented methods. Its unique development deserves to be addressed by both its makers and those who fight for its welfare after creation.
    Our primary goal is to straddle an antiquated divide. Instead of finite responsibilities dictated by title, archivists and artists must learn to work collaboratively in the complex independent media environment. Join us on October 13 as we bridge the gap!
    Registration Fee: $15.00
    Students with valid ID: $9.00
    Seating is extremely limited
    Register at:
    http://www.imappreserve.org/join/membership.html
    Questions:
    Kathryn Gronsbell via NYU.AMIA@gmail.com
    Jeff Martin via imap@imappreserve.org
    Archiving the Arts is part of New York Archives Week, which is organized by the Archivists Round Table of Metropolitan New York. www.nycarchivists.org.
  3. ALCTS web course: Fundamentals of Collection Development and Management
    Session: October 1-October 26,  2012
    This four-week online course addresses the basic components of collection development and management (CDM) in libraries. The course was developed by Peggy Johnson, University of Minnesota. Complete definition of collection development and collection management
    – Collections policies and budgets as part of library planning
    – Collection development (selecting for and building collections)
    – Collection management (evaluating and making decisions about existing collections, including decisions about withdrawal, transfer, preservation)
    – Collection analysis-why and how to do it
    – Outreach, liaison, and marketing
    – Trends and some suggestions about the future for collection development and management
    Outcomes: At the end of this course, you will be able to:
    – Describe the range of CDM responsibilities and the required skills and competencies
    – List the elements in a collection development policy
    – Write a collection development policy
    – Explain the importance of collection analysis
    – Perform one or more types of analysis
    – Explain outreach and liaison responsibilities and be able to develop a plan to increase your activities in these areas
    Who Should Attend: This is a fundamentals course that will appeal to anyone interested in the topic with no previous experience.
    Credits: This course is one-third of the Collection Management elective course approved by the Library Support Staff Certification Program (LSSCP)<http://www.ala.org/alcts/confevents/upcoming/webcourse/lsscp>
    Registration Fees:  $109 ALCTS Member and  $129 Non-member
    For additional details including registration links and contact information
    see: http://www.ala.org/alcts/confevents/upcoming/webcourse/fcdm/ol_templ
    For questions about registration, contact ALA Registration by calling
    1-800-545-2433 and press 5 or email registration[at]ala[dot]org. For all other questions or comments related to this web courses, contact Julie Reese, ALCTS Events Manager at 1-800-545-2433, ext. 5034 or alctsce@ala.org.

Educational opportunities- free webinar & more!

Remember, for ongoing opportunities and deadlines please visit the Educational Opportunities Calendar.

Free Webinar: Developing Your Plan for Successful Career Growth and Advancement

Presenters: Deb Hunt and David Grossman

Format: Webinar

Date: Tuesday, August 14, 2012

Start Time: 12 Noon Pacific
1PM Mountain
2PM Central
3PM Eastern

This webinar will last approximately one hour. Webinars are free of charge. Registration is ONLY done on the day of the event on the WebEx server starting 30 minutes before the start of the webinar. No Passwords are required. For Tips and Registration Information, please go to http://infopeople.org/training/webcasts/tips.html

For more information and to participate in the Tuesday, August 14, 2012 webinar, go to http://infopeople.org/training/developing-your-plan

The first webinar in this series focused broadly on skills that are needed in the contemporary library environment, and where to find training in those skills. This webinar will focus on your individual skills and skill gaps. Determining the specific combination of skills you need to acquire in order to advance your career or take it in a different direction can be a daunting challenge.

How can you:
Determine which skills are essential for pursuing your chosen career path?
Craft a plan to acquire the critical skills that may be lacking or increase your level of competency for skills you already possess?
Acquire the new skills necessary for career advancement if you are unable to attain those them within the confines of your current job?
Successfully break through these barriers and smooth the way to career growth and expansion?
Design and create a resume that will rise to the top of the pile and maximize you chances of landing your dream job?
In this one-hour webinar, participants will learn a number of proven strategies to acquire new skills and be shown how to formulate a plan to attain those new skills or bolster the skills they already possess. They also learn how to successfully overcome some of the greatest barriers to career growth. Finally, they learn how to redesign their resumes to garner maximum impact.
At the end of this one-hour webinar, participants will:
Be able to generate a customized list of the skills they need and levels of expertise they must attain in order to move their careers forward and meet their career objectives.
Be able to conceptualize and prioritize their skill acquisition strategies to meet their career objectives.
Be able to create a customized plan for the acquisition of new skills or improvement of existing skills to meet their career objectives.
Learn how to overcome the five biggest obstacles for career advancement
Know how to rewrite their resume to stand out from the crowd and maximize their chances of success.
This webinar will be of interest to Library staff contemplating the next job opportunity or career change and those seeking to identify their current skills and acquiring new ones.
This is part of a series of four webinars. The other presentations can found at:
Webinar 1: Identifying and Acquiring New Skills: The Key to Career Growth and Advancement July 10, 2012
Webinar 2: Developing Your Plan for Successful Career Growth and Advancement August 14, 2012
Webinar 3: Successful Librarians Share Their Stories of Career Growth and Advancement Coming in September 2012
Webinar 4: Telling Your Story: Five Secrets for Successful Career Growth and Advancement Coming in October 2012
If you are unable to attend the live event, you can access the archived version the day following the webinar. Check our archive listing at: http://infopeople.org/training/view/webinar/archived

Submit reports for “E-Resources Round Up” column 

If you attended ALA Annual or other professional conferences this summer, you are invited to submit reports for programs dealing with electronic resources in libraries to the “E-Resources Round Up” column for volume 24, number 4 of the Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship (JERL).

The “E-Resource Round Up” column is dedicated to helping JERL readers better understand topics related to the ever-changing world of electronic resources and their roles in libraries. It covers developments in the areas of new and emerging technologies and systems related to electronic resources and the digital environment; reports from professional discussion groups, meetings, presentations, and conferences; news and trends related to electronic resource librarianship; tips and suggestions on various aspects of working with electronic resources; opinion pieces; vendor activities; and upcoming events of potential interest to JERL readers.

Your contribution to the column does not have to be lengthy, and could be on any of the topics listed above. This could be an ideal opportunity for you to report on sessions you attended that may benefit others in our profession. If you are interested in submitting a program report, please check with the presenters first to make sure they are not planning to write their own version for publication.

The editors would like to receive contributions to the column by Friday, August 17, 2012.

If you have a submission or questions, please contact the column editors:

Bob Wolverton
Mississippi State University Libraries
(662) 325-4618
bwolverton[at]library[dot]msstate[dot]edu

Karen Davidson
Mississippi State University Libraries
(662) 325-3018
kdavidson[at]library[dot]msstate[dot]edu

ALCTS Web Course: Fundamentals of Preservation
Session: September 10 – October 5, 2012

Four-week online course that introduces participants to the principles, policies and practices of preservation in libraries and archives. It is designed to inform all staff, across divisions and departments and at all levels of responsibility. Provides tools to begin extending the useful life of library collections.

Course components:
Preservation as a formal library function, and how it reflects and supports the institutional mission
The primary role of preventive care, including good storage conditions, emergency planning, and careful handling of collections
The history and manufacture of physical formats and how this impacts on preservation options
Standard methods of care and repair, as well as reformatting options
Challenges in preserving digital content and what the implications are for the future of scholarship
This course is one-third of the Collection Management Elective course approved by the Library Support Staff Certification Program (LSSCP).

Registration Fees: $109 ALCTS Member and $129 Non-member

For additional details, registration, and contact information please see: http://www.ala.org/alcts/conf! events/upcoming/webcourse/fpres/ol_templ

For questions about registration, contact ALA Registration by calling 1-800-545-2433 and press 5 or email registration[at]ala[dot]org. For all other questions or comments related to the web courses, cont! act Julie Reese, ALCTS Events Manager at 1-800-545-2433, ext.! 5034 or alctsce[at]ala[dot]org.
To view this Event in Connect, go to http://connect.ala.org/node/184047

CALL FOR PARTICIPATION: Remaking Research: Emerging Research Practices in Art and Design

Remaking Research: Emerging Research Practices in Art and Design invites artists, designers and educators to submit proposals for Featured Research Projects to be presented at the symposium.
Remaking Research is an AICAD ‘working symposium’ centred on the discourse, pragmatics and possibilities of creative practice as research, both within art and design institutions and in the context of interdisciplinary, inter-institutional, and partnered relations taking place at Emily Carr University of Art + Design in Vancouver, Canada from November 1-3, 2012.

We are currently accepting proposals to present research projects that address the Remaking Research Symposium themes:
The Production of Knowledge in Art and Design
The Political Economies of Art and Design Research
Networked and Partnered Research Practice
The ten-minute Featured Research Projects presentations are an opportunity to share a project or collaboration.
To submit a proposal to present a Featured Research Project, please send the following information to remaking[at]ecuad[dot]ca:
your name and institution
a short description of your project (300- 500 words)
no more than 5 images (jpeg or pdf)
an indication of the theme to which your project responds
DEADLINE: Thursday, September 20, 2012
SUBMIT TO: remaking[at]ecuad[dot]ca
PLEASE NOTE: Remaking Research is not able to support travel or conference fees for those presenting Featured Research Projects. We are happy, however, to support your participation by providing a letter confirming your contribution.


Grant, webinar, and other professional development opportunities!

See educational opportunities, such as CFP, workshops, events, webinars, etc.? Please email Braegan Abernethy (bcabernethy[at]gmail[dot]com) or Emilee Mathews (mathewse[at]indiana[dot]edu) to get them posted here.

For ongoing opportunities and deadlines, please visit the new Educational Opportunities Calendar.

REMINDER: The final deadline for Papers, Sessions, and Workshops Proposals for the ARLIS/NA 2013 Annual Conference Crafting Our Future is this Friday, June 29.

Call for Contributors
A new website devoted to art, thought, and surprise inspired by the content found in freely available digital archives, Each Moment a Mountain is seeking contributions and collaborations with writers, archivists, teaching librarians, and other educators.
www.eachmomentamountain.org
Contributions
Each Moment a Mountain is looking for contributors in the following categories: blessays (see http://www.dancohen.org/2012/05/24/the-blessay/), fiction, poetry, music, visual/multimedia art, and interviews of artists and scholars working with the concept of memory. More information on submissions can be found at the following URL:
http://www.eachmomentamountain.org/submissions/
Collaborations
Each Moment a Mountain is also looking for history educators, teaching librarians, archivists, and others interested in using the site as a pedagogical tool. The editors are open to your ideas, but provide the following as examples of the collaborations we’re looking for:
-The design and execution of information literacy sessions, student assignments, or classroom activities around the use of Each Moment a Mountain in your classroom (including both responses to the site and student contributions).
-The nomination of archives to be featured on the site.
-The development of curricular tools and documentation that illustrate use of Each Moment a Mountain to meet curricular standards like The Common Core, VALUE rubrics, and others.
-Sustained partnerships and titled positions for the right collaborators.
Potential contributors and collaborators can get in touch with the editors at eachmomentamountain@gmail.com. All are welcome to follow Each Moment a Mountain on Twitter for content updates and more: @eachmomenta

Nancy Pearl Presents Book Lust Rediscoveries
Tuesday, July 10, 2pm Eastern
Join esteemed Seattle librarian Nancy Pearl in conversation with two authors from her new book series, Book Lust Rediscoveries, a publishing program devoted to reintroducing some of the best (and now out of print) novels originally published between 1960-2000. Each new edition is personally selected by Nancy Pearl and includes an introduction by her, discussion questions for book groups, and a list of recommended further reading. She will be joined by Rhian Ellis, author of After Life, and Frederick G. Dillen, author of Fool, to discuss the series, as well as their own favorite moments of discovering a wonderful book. The discussion will be moderated by the series’ editor, Alan Turkus, and hosted by Booklist Adult Books senior editor Donna Seaman.
https://alapublishing.webex.com/mw0307l/mywebex/default.do?nomenu=true&siteurl=alapublishing&service=6&rnd=0.6519851798076816&main_url=https%3A%2F%2Falapublishing.webex.com%2Fec0606l%2Feventcenter%2Fevent%2FeventAction.do%3FtheAction%3Ddetail%26confViewID%3D1002700739%26%26%26%26siteurl%3Dalapublishing

 
The Visual Resources Association’s 31st Annual Conference will be held in Providence, Rhode Island, from Wednesday, April 3 through Saturday, April 6, 2013, in the Providence Biltmore, a cherished architectural treasure.
Proposals are now being solicited for the 2013 program sessions, workshops, papers, special interest/user groups, and case studies.  All proposals are welcome, especially those related to the 2013 VRA Conference theme, “Capitalizing on Creativity”.   Click here to go to the conference proposal form, which can also be accessed through the Visual Resources Association page.
A session is a 90 minute moderated session with 3 to 4 speakers at 20 minutes each followed by a facilitated brief question and answer period.
A workshop is a 3 to 4 hour workshop to develop skills and experience in the field of Visual Resources, preferably with hands-on activities.
A paper is an individual idea submission, which will be reviewed for possible grouping into a session.
A special interest group is a 60 to 90-minute informal facilitated group discussion on topics related to a specific community within VRA.
A case study is detailed information about an individual, small group, or project, generally including the accounts of subjects themselves.  Moderators are encouraged to submit proposals.  Individual case study proposals will be reviewed for possible groupings similar to the session format.
The quality of conference content depends upon YOUR ideas and contributions, so get those creative juices flowing.  Use the “Capitalizing on Creativity” conference theme, suggested topics from VRA members (see below), and your imagination to propose ideas which expand our outlooks beyond that which is familiar.  If there is an area of concern or interest that you feel has not been adequately addressed in previous programs, do consider participating in this process by submitting a proposal.  Moderators may put out calls for speakers within a proposed topic before submission of completed topics.  The VRA Executive Board will be looking for complete, concise and articulate submissions with lists of presenters, when applicable. Specificity regarding audio-visual needs including live internet connectivity is recommended.
To stimulate the creative process, here are some excellent suggestions for proposal themes and topics selected from the post-conference survey responses, listed in no particular order:

  • VRC physical space issues
  • Cross-disciplinary outreach
  • Multidisciplinary cataloging
  • African art cataloging
  • Project and time management
  • Copyright sharing
  • Open access
  • Budget cut impacts
  • Digital content archiving and preservation
  • Digital asset management
  • Digital Humanities initiatives
  • VRC/Library collaboration
  • Fate of VR analog collections
  • VR curators/teachers (dual roles)
  • eBook and eJournal image content
  • Crisis management
  • Image tagging
  • Digitizing and access of student work

Questions about the proposal process and the various presentation formats included in the VRA Conference program can be directed to me at .
The proposal deadline is July 27, 2012.  I look forward to receiving your proposals!

Visual Resources Association Foundation Professional Development Grant
Purpose:
The purpose of the VRAF Professional Development grant is to support professional development in the field of visual resources and image management. The grant will support attendance at an educational event of the grantee’s choosing (such as an association conference, symposium or workshop), or engagement in relevant research activities (such as publications and/or fieldwork). In recognition of the differing professional development needs for an emerging professional and an established career professional, two awards will be funded. One grant will be awarded to a student or new professional who has up to five years of experience in the field, and the other grant will be designated for a career professional with six or more years of experience. At the discretion of the VRAF Board and with approval of the applicant, an application may be moved to a different category that better fits the experience criteria or the applicant can choose to withdraw the application
Although the specific criteria for the grant may change from year to year in order to provide support for a range of experiences and community members, with the 2012-2013 awards we encourage the VR community to consider opportunities at any visual resources-related professional development venue.
The VRAF Professional Development Grant is part of the Foundation’s mission to advance awareness of critical issues for effective digital information management (including intellectual property and copyright); to encourage the application of professional standards, innovative technology, and metadata cataloging protocols; and to facilitate workplace training. The VRA Foundation supports a range of educational offerings to help ensure that such information reaches a diverse, global audience.
Award Amount:
Each of the two 2012-2013 awards will provide a grant of $850. The grant is for use between September 1, 2012 and August 31, 2013.
Eligibility:
The grant is open to all visual resource professionals, including retirees and those currently unemployed. The Foundation also encourages students seeking educational, training, and research opportunities in support of broad access to cultural information, to apply. Membership in the Visual Resources Association is not required. Each applicant’s financial statement of need will be considered, together with other applications for funding for the same event or project, which must be disclosed by the applicant.
Grant monies may be used for:

  • transportation
  • registration/tuition
  • accommodations
  • meals
  • research
  • expenses

Application Deadline and Decision Announcement:
Applications for the 2012-2013 grants due: Friday, July 20, 2012
Award decision public announcement: August 31, 2012
Guidelines and Application Form: http://vrafoundation.org.s119319.gridserver.com/index.php/grants/professional_development_grant/
Application Form:
http://vrafoundation.org/downloads/VRAF_PDGrantCall_for_Applic2012.doc
http://vrafoundation.org/downloads/VRAF_PDGrantCall_for_Applic2012.pdf
Completed applications, as well as any preliminary questions, should be sent via e-mail to:
Alix Reiskind, VRA Foundation Board Director areiskind@gsd.harvard.edu

Infopeople’s webinar “Hack Your Career: Dream Job FTW!”
Title:  Hack Your Career: Dream Job FTW!
Presenters: Nicole Pasini and Jesse Lanz
Format:  Webinar
Date:  Wednesday, July 18, 2012
Start Time: 12 Noon Pacific
            1PM Mountain
            2PM Central
            3PM Eastern
This webinar will last approximately one hour. Webinars are free of charge.  Registration is ONLY done on the day of the event on the WebEx server starting 30 minutes before the start of the webinar. No Passwords are required.  For Tips and Registration Information, please go to http://infopeople.org/training/webcasts/tips.html
For more information and to participate in the Wednesday, July 18, 2012 webinar, go tohttp://infopeople.org/training/hack-your-career

  • Do you know what your dream job is, but don’t quite know how to get it?
  • Are you an ideal job candidate with less-than-ideal interview skills?
  • Are you stymied by the civil service process?

There is no denying that the job market is tough these days, but there are steps you can take to ensure that your next interviewer sees you as the best candidate for the job.  And for those of you who are employed, there are steps you can take to ensure that the work that you do today could help land your dream job someday.  
In this one-hour webinar you will:

  • Learn to approach the job search and interview process from the perspective of the person doing the hiring.  
  • Gain insight into how to think strategically about your current job, as well asabout how to prepare to get the next one.
  • Discover tips for navigating the often baffling world of the civil service application and interview.  
  • Learn the things that hiring managers wish every job candidate knew.  

Though we can’t promise a recovery of the job market, we’re certain that in this webinar you’ll learn ways to Hack Your Career—Dream Job, For the Win!
At the end of this one-hour webinar, participants will:

  • Identify the three questions they need to answer before beginning the job search process.
  • Understand the three major ways that civil service hiring processes differ from hiring processes in the private and nonprofit sectors.
  • Identify ten steps that go into successful resumes, applications and interviews, from the perspective of hiring managers.

This webinar will be of interest to public library staff (though there will be plenty of useful information for staffs of all types of libraries), library school students, job seekers, or any people who are thinking about the next stage of their careers.  
If you are unable to attend the live event, you can access the archived version the day following the webinar.  Check our archive listing at:  http://infopeople.org/training/view/webinar/archived


Conference, CFP, and Webinar

See educational opportunities, such as CFP, workshops, events, webinars, etc.? Please email Braegan Abernethy (bcabernethy[at]gmail[dot]com) or Emilee Mathews (mathewse[at]indiana[dot]edu) to get them posted here.

For ongoing opportunities and deadlines, please visit the new Educational Opportunities Calendar.

2012 Digital Library Federation (DLF) Forum

The 2012 Digital Library Federation (DLF) Forum is seeking proposals for presentations, panel discussions, workshops, research updates, and hands-on, problem-solving sessions. The Forum is a working meeting where DLF members come together to discover better methods of working through sharing and collaboration. Participation is open to all those interested in contributing to and playing an active part in the successful future of digital libraries, museums and archives services and collections.
Managing the digital content lifecycle is a complex challenge, requiring creative and collaborative approaches. In that spirit, and to maximize the Forum’s benefit and better facilitate the community’s work, the Forum’s schedule will provide many opportunities to actively engage and network.
For the 2012 DLF Forum, the Program Planning Committee is requesting proposals within the broad framework of digital collections and their effect on libraries, museums and archives services, infrastructure, resources, and organizational priorities. Proposals should strive to contribute to the following topics:

  • Digital technology design
  • Management and assessment
  • Data
  • Collaboration

We welcome proposals on these and other areas from current community members and non-members who are interested in joining the DLF community. For more detailed examples, please see the 2011 DLF Forum schedule: http://www.diglib.org/forums/2011forum/schedule/.

Session genres include:
Presentations and Panels: Traditional lecture format with question-and-answer sessions. Speakers are requested to use only half of the allocated time for the presentation, including how they wish to engage the DLF community in their work. The second half of the session should focus on conversations about next steps, engagement with the community, and clarification of points raised during the presentation.
Workshops: In-depth, hands-on training about a tool, technique, workflow, etc. You can recommend a topic or trainer, or you can volunteer to share your own expertise.
Research Updates: An opportunity for those working in digital collections research to present their preliminary findings for community feedback and discussion.

Working Sessions: Creative problem solvers, including project managers, developers, and/or administrators, gather to address a specific problem. This does not have to be a computational problem. The approach can be applied to workflow issues, metadata transformations, or other complex problems that would benefit from a collective, dynamic solution approach.
Community Showcase: A modified poster session. Presenters will have the opportunity to interact with Forum participants to discuss their current research projects, and/or demonstrate tools or services they have developed or are using in their digital library environment. Demos must include a poster element.
Proposal Submission Guidelines and Evaluation Procedures
Complete proposals should be submitted using the online submission form(http://www.diglib.org/forums/2012forum/2012-dlf-forum-proposal-submission-form/) by 11:59 PM on July 1, 2012. Proposals must include a title, session leader, session genre, proposal description (maximum 300 words), and proposal abstract (maximum 100 words).
After an initial review by the Program Planning Committee, all proposals will be posted on the DLF website for community polling. The community vote will be taken into consideration, and the Program Planning Committee will make the final decisions. Those submitting complete proposals will be notified of their status by August 10, 2012. Presenters will be guaranteed a registration place.

Archives and Activism

Call for Papers

“The rebellion of the archivist against his normal role is not, as so many scholars fear, the politicizing of a neutral craft, but the humanizing of an inevitably political craft.”
— Howard Zinn “Secrecy, Archives, and the Public Interest,” Vol. II, No. 2 (1977) of Midwestern Archivist.

The boundaries between “archivist” and “activist” have become increasingly porous, rendering ready distinctions between archivists (traditionally restricted to the preservation of records, maintaining accountability, and making critical information available to the communities they serve) and activists (who, with greater frequency, look to archives or adopt elements of archival practice as a means of documenting their struggles) virtually unsustainable. In the past year, archivists and citizen activists collaborated to document the Occupy Wall Street movement, and archivists committed to open government worked with the New York City Council to advocate for keeping the Municipal Archives as an independent city agency. While the apparent convergence of archival and activist worlds may appear a timely and relevant topic, these distinct communities often deliberate their roles separately with little dialogue.

The Archivists Round Table of Metropolitan New York and the New School Archives and Special Collections are sponsoring a symposium to bring together a diverse group of archivists, activists, students, and theorists with the aim of facilitating discussion of their respective concerns.  Among its proposed topics, the symposium will address potential roles that archivists may engage in as activists, as well as how archivists can assume a greater role in documenting and contributing toward social and political change.

Possible areas of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

-Archivists documenting the work of activists and activist movements
-Activists confronting traditional archival practice
-Possible models for an emergent “activist archives”
-Methodologies for more comprehensively documenting activism
-Archivist and activist collaborations -Community-led archives and repositories operating outside of the archivalestablishment
-Archives as sites of knowledge (re)production and in(ter)vention -Relational paradigms for mapping the interplay of power, justice, and archives
-Critical pedagogy in the reference encounter
-Interrogating preconceptions and misunderstandings that obscure common goals

Date: Friday, October 12, 2012

Location: Theresa Lang Community and Student Center, The New School

All individual presentations will be 20 minutes long (10 page paper).
Submissions must include a title, name of author and institutional affiliation (if applicable), abstract (250 words max), and indication of technological requirements.
Individual papers or entire panel proposals accepted.

Deadline for Proposals: Proposals should be emailed to admin@nycarchivists.org by August 1, 2012.

Embedded Librarians: What, Why, & How

Date/ Time: Tuesday, June 26, 2012

10:00 am – 12:00 noon EDT

Location: Online – Your desk or conference room.
Registration: $10 SCRLC members; $15 non-members; $25 Groups
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for all librarians and staff, especially those who work with distance learning students and remote library users. Academic and school library staff are encouraged to attend.
Tech Support: You will need –

• An Internet-connected computer

• Computer speakers or phone for sound

• Computer projector if a group is ‘attending’

Funding: This training is funded in part by Federal Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) funds, awarded to the New York State Library by the Federal Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS).

Embedded librarianship is a great way to reach distance and remote patrons and bring services and resources to them wherever they are.  But the term embedded librarian does not mean just one thing: it is an umbrella term that includes a number of service models and levels of activity.  What, exactly, are the service models, and how can a library choose and implement the best model to fit their needs?  This session will examine best practices for embedded librarianship by looking at several successful models and considering goals, design, and assessment of an embedded librarian program.

Presenter:
Laura Saunders received her PhD from Simmons College Graduate School of Library and Information Science in May 2010.  She was a reference librarian and branch manager of the Career Resource Library for Simmons College, where she provided reference and instruction services, as well as participated in collection development, Web page maintenance, and marketing of library services.  While completing her PhD, she worked as an adjunct faculty member.  Currently, she is an Assistant Professor at Simmons College, teaching in the areas of reference, evaluation of information services, information literacy, and academic libraries. Her first book, Information Literacy as a Student Learning Outcome:  The Perspective of Institutional Accreditation comes out in June 2011. Her research interests include information literacy, assessment, accreditation, reference services, and the place of libraries in higher education.  She has had articles published in The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Library & Information Science Research, College & Research Libraries, and portal: Libraries and the Academy.