Job Posting: Exhibit Coordinator (Temporary), Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, NY, NY

https://jobs.columbia.edu/applicants/jsp/shared/frameset/Frameset.jsp?time=1436286383093

The Columbia University Libraries seeks a creative, motivated and organized Exhibit Coordinator to provide coordination and operational support for the successful completion of the New York Nexus: Sheffield Farms Interpretive Exhibit in the Manhattanville campus. Reporting to the Director of the Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library, the Exhibit Coordinator will work with various stakeholders across the University to bring the exhibit to completion. This is a temporary 12-month position with possibility of extension.

Responsibilities include:
– Researching and assisting in establishing a creative direction for the exhibit, documentary, web and print collateral components.
– Developing and implementing an overall completion schedule for all project components.
– Working with lenders on logistics of loans, reprography orders, and rights/permissions of use requests.
– Coordinating the development of RFIs and RFPs for outsourcing, the selection of vendors, and the drafting of vendor contracts; monitors vendor performance; monitors outsourcing budgets and vendor invoices.
– Monitoring and coordinating workflow of all participating units and acting as point of contact for all sub-contractors; providing onsite supervision of installation and other parts of the project as needed.
– Compiling and communicating information related to the exhibition and serving as primary liaison among all project stakeholders.
– Performing other duties as assigned.
New York Nexus: Sheffield Farms Interpretive Exhibit will include a physical exhibit and documentary film describing the history of the Manhattanville dairy industry in the first decades of the twentieth century. The exhibit will focus on how technological improvements in the production of milk positively impacted public health and the economy of the region and the city.

The Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library is one of the most comprehensive architecture and fine arts library collections in the world. Avery collects a full range of primary and secondary sources for the advanced study of architecture, historic preservation, art history, decorative arts, city planning, real estate, and archaeology.

As one of the world’s leading research universities, Columbia University in the City of New York provides outstanding opportunities to work and grow in a dynamic, multicultural, intellectual community. The Columbia University Libraries comprises a diverse and engaged staff committed to furthering the University’s teaching and research mission through innovation, collaboration and a commitment to excellence.

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Library Science at Artspace, New Haven

Over at … might be good right now there is a post by Claire Ruud, who interviewed Rachel Gugelberger, curator of Library Science at Artspace, New Haven.

When the library of the Brooklyn Museum invited Bunn to do a project with its recently discarded card catalogue, he arrived to find that the replacement online catalogue (Voyager) had crashed and the electronic backup had been erased. Bunn’s No Voyager Record (2008), included in Library Science, projects the physical cards marked with the librarians’ annotations to restore the lost and missing entries. The work captures the digital’s continued reliance on the analogue, despite rapidly advancing technology.

The mission of the show is to “investigate how our physical, intellectual and personal relationships with the library and its materials are changing as libraries adapt to the digital world.”

Has  anyone visited this show or other installations that deal with libraries?  What were your impressions?


Book As Sculpture Exhibition at Dodd Research Center

A cool exhibition at the Dodd Research Center highlights works created by students in a first year studio foundation art class.  Here’s the word from the Dodd’s blog:

Given as an assignment to a first year studio foundation art class, students were challenged to consider the function of the book and encouraged to rethink its form as sculptural object. Additionally, the students were inspired by viewing some of the diverse forms of one-of-a- kind and limited edition artists’ books housed at the Dodd Research Center…

Through a series of transformative gestures and repetitive actions such as folding, cutting, scoring, curling, punching, incising and shredding, the function of book as object of information is transformed into structure, sculpture. These repetitive acts, to the point of exaggeration, have created new and startling physical shapes that we take notice of first. For some of the creators, the book’s title helped prompt an action informing us of the book’s potential content.  For others, a singular process took shape without considering the book’s original intention. Irony, wit, poetic reference, and obsessive gesture push the book’s singular recognizable form into a new physical shape. Some of the pages turn, but the text is not the text of legibility. Others offer the viewer a window into the process of alteration.

Book As Sculpture Exhibition
Through April 30, 2011,
Monday-Friday 10-4
Dodd Research Center
John P. McDonald Reading Room
University of Connecticut
405 Babbidge Road, Unit 1205
Storrs, CT 06269-1205

(h/t: Fresh Pickin’s)


Adey at the Athenaeum

Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YmlvGwUX-4U#t=1m40s

David Adey discusses his work at the Athenaeum Music & Arts Library (@ 1 min. 40 sec.–deep linking doesn’t work for embedded youtube videos on WP). Other San Diego Fine Art Society 2010 Art Awards winners also discuss their work.


ARLIS/NA Lunchtime Chat Friday 10/1: “Breaking Out of the Glass Case: Collaborative Exhibitions in Library Spaces”

Join us for the first Lunchtime Chat of the 2010-11 season, tomorrow, Friday October 1. Chats are free and open to all; to view and participate in upcoming events, visit the ARLIS/NA Lunchtime Chats webpage at http://www.arlisna.org/chats/index.html . Scroll down for instructions and to enter the Meebo chat room. On behalf of the Professional Development/ Education Subcommittee, I hope to see you there!

—  Heather K

Breaking Out of the Glass Case: Collaborative Exhibitions in Library Spaces

October 1, 11am Pacific – 12pm Mountain – 1pm Central – 2pm Eastern

Libraries can be powerful sites for collaboration with artists and art institutions. A wide range of visitors pass though our spaces every day, providing ample opportunities to connect people, art, and information. Our guest moderators – an artist/curator and a librarian – will discuss the ways in which they have created such interactions within their respective communities. Looking at case studies from public and academic libraries, this chat will offer ideas and insights to all who are interested in bringing art into the library.

Discussion Leaders: Lorna Brown, artist and independent curator; Laura Graveline, Visual Arts Librarian, Dartmouth College
ARLIS/NA Education Subcommittee contacts: Heather Koopmans (hkoopman@scad.edu) & Adrienne Lai (adrienne_lai@ncsu.edu)

Related links:


Thinking about How We Label Images

As an image cataloger I don’t often have the opportunity to write such long descriptions of art work as these, but I do assign many short or one-word labels to images. In response to the question below, I’m often the one who gets to decide. For example, many painting titles refer to rape scenes as abductions (or vice versa), yet both are listed in the Library of Congress Subject Authority. Either would probably help people find images, but the implications are quite different, in my opinion. Have any of you encountered this particular issue of labeling images? How do you approach it?

From the Jane Addams Hull House Museum:

Alternative Labeling Project

Was Mary Rozet Smith Jane Addams’s companion, lesbian lover, or life-long partner?  Why should we care?  What is at stake in how we describe their relationship? Who gets to decide?

Please take a few minutes to participate in our civic engagement and reflection project. Choose one of three labels that you think best describes the portrait of Mary Rozet Smith.

To comment, visit the Hull-House Response Board inside Jane Addams Hull-House museum or participate in our weblog HERE.

http://www.uic.edu/jaddams/hull/newdesign/labelingproject.html


Frame That Spam!

A unique multimedia presentation of the intersection of art and information from Wired:

Data-Crunching Artists Transform the World of Information

http://www.wired.com/special_multimedia/2008/ff_dataart_1603